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A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Links to pages with Photos of Groups   Frequently Asked Questions

  Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Links to Dumbiedykes pages  Link to Granton pages  Link to Leith pages   Link to Newhaven pages   Links to Portobello pages   Link to My Recent Talks

 

Recollections

Granton, Boswall, Royston

   Postcard by an unidentified publisher  -  Looking to the east along Lower Granton Road ©

since the

1940s

1.

Hugh Hainley
Midlothian, Scotland

Thanks

Granton Square

Fizzy Drinks and Chocolate

Granton Quarry

Military Vehicles

"Highland Laddie"

2.

Alastair Berry
Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Middle Pier

3.

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

with replies from

Douglas Beath
Tasmania, Australia

Elizabeth Baillie (née Martin)
near Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England

Bob Sinclair
Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)
Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Rev. Deborah Cornish
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

Food and Drink

Martin's Shipyard

Granton School

19 Bus

Granton Beach

Middle Pier

Granton Square

The Embassy

Granton Methodist Church

4.

Donald Campbell Veale
South-east Kent, England

The Embassy

Granton School

5.

Monica Shaw
Boswall, Edinburgh

Old homes

New home

6.

Ann Watson
Edinburgh

Granton Crescent

Granton School

Around Granton Harbour

Trains and Buses

7.

Duncan Shedden
Shetland, Scotland

The Embassy

8.

John Ross  - known as Ian Ross
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

Concerts

Toffee for 1d

Hay & Co, High St and Granton

9

Sandra Newlands
Orkney Islands, Scotland

Granton School Photo

10

Alex Dow
Fife, Scotland

Granton Station

Northern Lighthouse Board

U-Boat

RAF High-Speed Launches

Coal for the Trawlers

Granton Ice Factory

Esparto Grass

11

Dave Woolard
Edinburgh

Granton Ferries

The Square Centre Youth Club

Snow Sliding

12

Bob Grant
Queensferry, Edinburgh

 with reply from

Steven Oliver
Duns, Borders, Scotland

Royston

Shops

The Embassy

13

Hughie Grey
Australia

E & M Ferry

Middle Pier

Shells

Granton Square

Mum and Dad

Move to Australia

14

John Clark
Canada

Parties

Breakwater

Bakery

Mussels and Buckies

Granton Square

15

Graham Simpson
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Lower Granton Road  Roll Shop

16

Jockey Sturgeon
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

with replies from

John Stevenson  Answer 1
Trinity, Edinburgh

and

Eddie Collie  Answer 2
Ontario, Canada

and

Terry Russell  Answer 3
Sandwich, Kent

and

Mike Chirnside  Answer 4
Sandwich, Kent

Lower Granton Road  Roll Shop

17

Bill Golder
East Wemyss, Fife, Scotland

Riots

Collecting Coal

Memories

18

Archie Foley
Joppa, Edinburgh

Shops

Milk Deliveries

Delivery Vans

19

John Clark
Canada

Warshiops

Hens

Rolls

20

Florence Towell (née Birnie)

Family and Schools

Bowling

Sports

Concerts

Magic Lantern

21

Stuart McCann

Granton Trawlers

22

Stuart McCann

Granton Trawlers

Australia and New Zealand

Leather Whip

23

Stuart McCann

Skipper 'Janders'

Accident

Leather Whip

24

Bob Grant
Queensferry, Edinburgh

Skipper 'Janders'

Accident

Leather Whip

25

Tom Orme
Lincolnshire, England

Philip Anderson & Co - Question

26

Norrie Stanton
Boswall, Edinburgh

Eddie Skeene as Roy Rogers

27

Bob Grant
Queensferry, Edinburgh

Request for Photos

28

John Clark
Canada

Buckies

29

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

Royston Internment Camp

United Wire Works

30

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

Fish Suppers

31

Catherine Meakes
(
née Mackenzie)

Berkshire, England

and reply from

David Welsh
East Lothian, Scotland

Ship Yard Worker
  -  Philip Mackenzie

32

Avril Finlayson Smith
(née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Martin's Shipyard

Schools

19 Buses

The Embassy

33

Jennifer Gare (née Hamilton)
Broomhouse, Edinburgh

Ainsley Park School

34

James Murno
SW France

1946-49

-  Granton Beach

-  West Harbour Road

35

Frank Ferri
Newhaven, Edinburgh

The Shoreline

Esparto Grass

35

Harry Flannigan
New Zealand

Gypsy Brae

Andrew Boath

37

James Murno
Le Tonkin, SW France

Embassy Cinema

Films

38

Iain C Purves
Waterdown, Ontario, Canada

Granton Trawlers

Trawler Radio Band

39

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar)
Waterdown, Ontario, Canada

Shops at Crewe Road North

40

Avril Finlayson Smith
(née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Shops at Crewe Road North

41

Carole Manson

Methodist Church

West Granton Road

Please scroll down to read more or click one of the links above.

 

Recollections

1.

Hugh Hainley

Midlothian, Scotland

Thank you to Duncan Shedden who was born in Lochinvar Camp, Wardie, in 1946 and now lives in Shetland.

Duncan wrote: 

Thanks

Many thanks, for bringing back so many boyhood memories of Old Granton. I started School at St David's West Granton Rd about 1942.

Granton Square

The square was a hive  of activity. Granton Harbour was the HQ of the Northern Minesweepers.

Just outside the Harbour was a row of Wood built shops.  One shop was a Café where you could get a hot pie and gravy with mashed tatties.

Further along if you could evade the Military Sentries were Yards full of cordite and all sorts of ammo and military stores.

Fizzy Drinks and Chocolate

I remember when the road opened after the war.  There was a hut called Grannie Smiths where you could buy Fizzy Drinks.

There was also a Tar Factory and a Chocolate Works although chocolate was still on ration

Granton Quarry

Just up the road a bit was Granton Quarry.  It had a very high cliff with a small ridge running along the top. About half way round was a set of Gates which were the back gates to Caroline House.

For a dare I would often climb this cliff and then over the gates into the house.

Military Vehicles

In the park there was hundreds of military vehicles.  I think this was for the D Day Landings.

We used to have great fun dodging the soldiers who were on guard.  I was caught a few times and was caned.  I held the School Record for the most caned boy in one day. This was the only thing I ever achieved at school.

"Highland Laddie"

One last wee story. It would be the summer of 1943, Morning Playtime.  I was looking through the railings of St David's school playground  at the bottom West Granton Road. This squad of soldiers came marching down West Granton Road turned left into the Square halted and stood at ease.

I escaped from the playground and ran behind the soldiers.  One of them gave me a bar of bitter black chocolate.

They were then stood down for a ten minute smoking break and this soldier began to sing 'Highland Laddie' I was hooked from that moment on, all I ever wanted to be was a soldier"

P.S. -  Yes I did become a soldier, for 25 years  -  and yes I got a belting for leaving the school playground."

Hugh Hainey, Loanhead, Midlothian, Scotland:  March 2005

 

Recollections

2.

Alastair Berry

Vancouver Island, British Columbia

Thank you to Alastair Berry for the recollections below:

Middle Pier

"After the War, around 1947-48, there used to be a boatman "OLD MAC" who  provided a well appreciated  service, in the days  before  out board  motors  became available.

He rowed the Royal Forth Yacht Club members out to their boats and generally 'keep an eye on them' during the week.

He used the slip on Middle Pier, and as I remember it he was rewarded for his endeavours with slugs of Whisky so that by late on a Saturday evening  his rowing became  rather erratic"

Alastair Berry, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Recollections

3.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for the recollections below, in response to comments by Hugh Hainley (above):

Food and Drink

"I also remember Granny Smith's hut. It was a bit dark inside and a bit of an Aladdin's cave for anybody after a few sweets or a drink."

Douglas Beath adds:

"I remember Granny Smith's cabin on the shore road near Caroline Park. The sign lettering was done with lemonade bottle caps nailed up."

Douglas Beath,  Tasmania adds:

"I have an idea that there was a sign for (Dunbar's?) lemonade factory not far from the middle pier.

Another couple of  places frequented by the workers down that way was the local watering hole "The Anchor Inn", and Demarcos where you could get a lovely ice cream. 

Demarco himself was a very good snooker player and had a number of tables at the back of the shop."

Martin's Shipyard

"Also going the other way towards Leith, there was a small shipyard James Martin & Son, who I believe were commandeered to build small naval craft during the second world war.

I knew Jimmy Martin's son Graham** who lived just up the road from me as did the Joiner foreman, a Mr Fleming.  We all lived in Pilton Avenue."

**   Reply 1

Elizabeth Baillie (née Martin) wrote:

Martin's Shipyard

"In the paragraph above, Bob Sinclair (who I used to know him as Robert, when he was a boy) mentions my father's business, James Martin & Son, Granton.

In fact, my brother's name was James, not Graham."

Elizabeth Baillie (née Martin), nr Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England:  December 24, 2012

Reply 2

     Bob Sinclair replied:

Martin's Shipyard

"Thank you, Elizabeth.  Of course, you are right about James' name.  I was getting confused with Graham Harvey who lived at the other side of the school entrance, downstairs."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  December 25, 2012

Reply 3

     Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young) replied:

Elizabeth

"I was just reading this snippet where James Martin & Son's was mentioned, and got such a lovely surprise to see a reply from the daughter of James Martin (Elizabeth Baillie, now).  I just couldn't believe my eyes after all those years.

I lived opposite the Martins and Elizabeth was one of my friends, when we were little, she and Eileen Rose and I often played together, sometimes I think Doreen Granton did too

At some point she lived next door to Elizabeth. I am hoping Elizabeth you might read this and would really love to hear from you again. Often wondered where you were and how life worked out for you. I believe Elizabeth also knew my husband, Tom Smith, at some time!

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young):  Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia:
Message posted in Edinphoto Guestbook, December 26, 2012

I've sent an email to Avril today, giving her Elizabeth's email address.
Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh, December 26, 2012

 

Granton School

"I had to go to Granton School one day - I think it was for an injection.

The distance from the main entrance on Boswall Parkway to the school entrance must have been one of the longest in any school. I was tired by the time I got to the school.

Adjoining the school was Granton Library where you could silently look for exciting books on Schoolboy adventures. Usually they were all out and there was a waiting list."

Granton school is still in use, with library round the back. The school is now looking smart with newly painted signs and a wooden boat, wooden train and tables and chairs in the area in front of the school.

   -  Peter Stubbs

19 Bus

"I remember going up the flights of steps from Granton Square to get the 19 bus which left from the top of the steps. I am sure that in the early days the 19 Bus drivers saw you coming and took off when you had about fifty yards to go. It can't have been sheer co-incidence each time."

Granton Beach

"Going on to Granton beach was a work of art in the summertime. If you were in your "baries" you had to watch where you put them or there was tar to scrape off your feet."

Middle Pier

"Some of the boys used to go to the Middle pier when the boats came in and the sailors occasionally unloaded fish.

If they were not in a generous mood we used to take our piece of cane and nail-attach a part of winkle and try to catch a fish.

I think we ever only caught one and threw it back out of pity for its size."

Granton Square

"It was fascinating sitting down at the square with a bag of sweets we bought between us watching the various trams coming and going.

Granton Square

    Trams at Granton Square  ©

There was also a single decker No.17 bus (it had a smell all it's own) which ran form the square to near the West End  and stopped outside McVities.

West End

    Tram at the West End of Princes Street ©

It was a bit of a boon to many who worked in the Wire Works."

The Embassy

"Then there was the local Flea Pit as we lovingly called it - the Bassy or the Embassy Picture House.

I once got to go Upstairs, because my mother who worked in Mackies as a waitress, was given a couple of complimentary tickets by a customer.

Later on when I had a little bit more guile I joined the band of a few kids who could only afford to in downstairs. At the end of the cartoons and supporting feature us kids made at rush at the upstairs doors and if lucky stayed there until the big picture was finished.

Some of us made it each time. Those who were lucky got out before the National Anthem was played - it was a real downer especially after a serial on a Saturday morning.

I know there was a sweet shop either side and I think one was McColls but I can't remember the name of the other. 

The real fun was when the Air Raid Siren went off. Was it located on top of the Police box just across from the Bassy?"

Granton Methodist Church

"As it happens I was married in Granton Methodist church which I believe no longer exists - such is life!"

Reply

After reading the comment above concerning Granton Methodist Church, Rev. Deborah Cornish  e-mailed to tell me that the church does still in fact exist.

Deborah wrote:

Granton Methodist Church

In September 2004 I was appointed by the Methodist Church to be the minister in charge at Granton Methodist Church.

However, in August 2004 it formally become a combined church, when it formed a partnership with Granton United Reform Church (previously the Congregational Church).

It is still alive and well, and looking forward to the future.

Rev. Deborah Cornish:  Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.  8 June 2005

 

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia  -  27 April 2005

 

Recollections

4.

Donald Campbell Veale

South-East Kent, England

Thank you to Donald Campbell Veale for the following:

The Embassy

What memories!  I have a lump in the throat: the Embassy where I ran on to the stage to belt the Wizard of Oz.

Granton School

Granton school got a mention  still going strong with a great bunch of Teachers.

Not open for play  in the evening as it used to be.  Playing with the guns from the amo trucks was great fun.

Donald Campbell Veale, South-East Kent, England

 

Recollections

5.

Monica Shaw

Boswall, Edinburgh

Thank you to Monica Shaw for the message left in the EdinPhoto Guest Book, including the following:

Old Homes

I was first brought home as a baby to 32 Boswall Quadrent , then at 5 years moved to 19 Boswall Terrace till I was 24.

The poshness !!  talked of from very early on to get into Boswall was still very much around.

No-one talked of houses being council, or the struggle to survive and to 'keep up with the Jones ' inside those homes.

The struggle and the 'feeling of being home' has never left me.

New Home

I am, in 2 weeks time I will be returning to Boswall, moving into my new home with my daughter at 4 Boswall Grove.

'home'   'Boswall'  !!

I will be looking on to 10 Boswall grove were my mother was brought, Josephine Mulhern and sisters Maureen Mulhern and little June also brother Andrew Mulhern.

Monica Shaw, Boswall, Edinburgh

 

Recollections

6.

Ann Begbie (née Watson)

Edinburgh

Thank you to Ann Begbie (née Watson) for the following message.  Ann lived at Carnegie Street, then moved to Granton Medway in 1938, then to 37 Granton Crescent.

Granton Crescent

"I lived at 37 Granton Crescent.  The house had a marvellous view of the harbour but the view has been lost now." 

This is the result of new housing being built around Granton which is on the edge of the Edinburgh Waterfront development.

Granton School

"My brothers and I went to Granton school.  The schools were closed at some time during the war, and Miss Birrel would come to the house to give out homework and collect it

Around Granton Harbour

"I remember the hut, and Flemings ink works and the red water.

I remember the businesses in Lower Granton Road:

-  Lewis's electricians was where my father worked during the war.

-   Mrs Lindsay's sweet shop was where people used to hand in sweet coupons if they never used them.

We used to go there for our rations and we had to wait till the shop was empty before we collected ours as she gave us extra from the handed-in coupons.

Trains and buses

Does anyone remember:

- a train that caught fire it had chocolate in it,  most of which melted before the fire was put out?

-  the bus drivers on the 19 buses would start the engines, then after you had run for the bus would switch the engine off when you stepped on the platform.

-  a conductress called Sadie?
If you were in her good books she never charged the proper fare.

Ann Begbie (née Watson), Edinburgh:  22 November 2005

 

Recollections

7.

Duncan Shedden

Shetland, Scotland

Thank you to Duncan Shedden, who was born in Lochinvar Camp, Granton, and now lives in Shetland for the following

The Embassy

I knew the old Embassy Picture House quite well. If I remember there was an R S McCall's sweet shop at one side and a paper shop at the other.

Oh for the days of the old 'ABC Minors' on a Saturday morning!

Duncan Shedden, Shetland, Scotland: December 10 + 13, 2005

 

Recollections

8.

John Ross

Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

  John Ross and his Grandparents ©

Thank you to John Ross (also known as Ian Ross), now living in Peterborough, England for the following.

Ian lived at 55 Pilton Crescent and attended Granton Primary School from the early 1940s, then David Kilpatrick School at Leith.

John wrote: 

Concerts

"I recall concerts in Granton School playground and in Pilton Park by some type of theatre group.

I remember a grumpy old park keeper who looked after Pilton park and used to try to keep us in order ."

Toffee for 1d

"There  was a lady living in ground floor of tenement house, I think by the name of Moriarty,  who used to make toffee in cake paper cups and we used to buy them from open window, one penny each.  These were such a treat as we did not have many sweets. This was near School and we went to her at playtime."

Hay & Co

High Street and Granton

"My father managed a grocer shop named Hay &  Co in High St, Edinburgh,  opposite John Knox House.

©

His friend managed the  branch in Granton.  I recall going there on Saturdays to collect our weekly rations.  My father was in the army then."

John (Ian) Ross, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England: June 21-30, 2006

John adds:

"It is wonderful to bring back all these memories.  It makes you feel real emotional."

John wrote again, telling me:

"This photo was taken about 1920.  My father is on the left."

John (Ian) Ross, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England: July 28, 2009

 

Recollections

9.

Sandra Newlands

Orkney, Scotland

Thank you to Sandra Newlands for sending me this old photograph of a class at Granton School.  Please click on the image below  to enlarge the picture.

Sandra writes:

Granton School

   A school class at Granton School in the 1940s or early 1950s. ©

"Here is a photograph of a class from Granton School, probably taken in the 1940s or early 1950s.  The teacher in this photo is now aged 86.  Do you recognise the teacher?"

If you recognise the teacher,  can you please e-mail me Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs

 

Recollections

10.

Alex Dow

Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Alex Dow, for the following recollections of Granton, and for his recollections of Granton in the 1930s and 1950s.

Alex wrote: 

Granton Station

"Around 1940, we may have travelled to Granton by special boat train, as the Harbour Station had been closed to normal traffic for several years.

 The station had served the Granton-Burntisland Train Ferry, which operated from quite early in the railway era until some time after the Forth Bridge opened in 1890.

As the ferry carried freight wagons only, the passengers had to walk from the station to board the ferry at the railway slip-way."

Northern Lighthouse Board

"My second early memory of Granton is of being aboard one of the Northern Lighthouse Board's tenders, possibly the Pharos; and seeing the mixed nature of its work.

The cabins for the lighthouse crews could be on board for up to three weeks as the vessel worked its way around the Scottish coast and the Isle of Man, plus the holds for the provisions, spares etc.  -  very graceful vessels."

U-Boat

"That was followed by visiting a German U-boat, U776, about June 1945."

"This submarine was captured late in the war; and was re-commissioned in the Royal Navy, sailing up and around Britain, calling at various ports, to let the general public see what a Type 7 U-boat was like - very cramped even for a nine-year-old. Some photos of it have appeared in books in recent years."

RAF High-Speed Launches

"Like another contributor, I recollect MTBs and RAF high-speed launches being worked on at the small shipyard in the corner by the East Breakwater."

Coal for the Trawlers

"In that period, Granton was still a major fishing port and most of the boats were steam driven, using coal. Towards the outer end of the Middle Pier was the Coal Hoist, with loaded and unloaded tracks serving it.

Several trucks would be pushed to the landward side of the hoist on the loaded track. The shunting locomotive would move back to the main sidings to carry on with other works.

The shunters would first unhook all the trucks, connect a cable from an electric windlass to the furthest away truck, then slowly wind the cable in intermittently, to place the leading loaded truck in the coal hoist, rather like moving it on to a weighbridge, which it also was.

That truck would be lifted up the hoist and tipped over sideways at the top, discharging the coal into the hoist's hopper, from which an adjustable conveyor belt carried the coal out over a fishing boat tied up on the west side of the pier."

'Black Stoor'

"The coal was dropped down flexible metal tubes to the boat's bunkers, rather like the plastic tubes seen on some demolition sites today.  Black stoor everywhere!

The hoist returned the emptied wagon to ground level, the shunter re-engaged the windlass to draw the remaining loaded trucks forward, pushing the emptied truck out on the seaward side.

Here the track dipped abruptly, to accelerate the emptied truck downwards then up over a set of trailing points to the buffered stub set a short distance above normal ground level.

The wagon rebounded of the buffers, down the stub; but at the points, it would move on to the other, unloaded track, to be caught by a slow-moving chain conveyor with large teeth protruding at intervals.

These teeth would engage with one or other of the wagon's axles, slowing it down but continuing to propel it to buffer up to the trucks unloaded earlier, which would be pushed forwards/inland by one truck's length as the newly-arrived truck came to a halt at the end of the chain.

Once all the trucks had been unloaded etc, the shunter would re-couple them, the loco would return and remove those unloaded trucks to the sidings further inland."

Granton Ice Factory

"About mid-way along the Middle Pier was the Granton Ice Factory. This produced ice which was also delivered by conveyer belt to the fishing boats,

I'm not sure whether this was before or after coaling, probably before as the coal hoist was nearer the harbour mouth."

Esparto Grass

"The West Pier saw many boats in from North Africa with Esparto Grass for high-quality paper-making, taken by train out to the mills strung out along the Water of Leith from Slateford to Balerno.

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the rail yard along the foreshore between the Middle and West Piers was a mass of condemned wagons."

Alex Dow:  September 10, 2006

 

Recollections

11.

Dave Woolard

Edinburgh

Thank you to Dave Woolard who recalls Granton in the late-1940s and early-1950s.

Dave wrote:

Granton Ferries

"I remember before we flitted from Arthur Street in Edinburgh to Granton. 

We used to get on a  No 8 tram with my Mum and Dad and brother's, going to Granton Square, then walk along the pier and get on the Willie Muir.  I also remember the other ferry, Thane o Fife."

The Square Centre Youth Club

"I remember going to the Square Centre Youth Club on Thursday nights.  It was a wooden hut just up from Granton Square.  We had some great times.

I'm not too sure, but I think the hut is still there. After we came out we would go round to the bakers on Lower Granton Road and buy hot rolls. Happy times"

Snow Sliding

"Another memory is of the winters in the snow; sliding down the hill between Granton  Crescent and St David's school on the curved bits of the Anderson Shelters. 

There were one or two mishaps crashing into the railings at the bottom."

Dave Woolard:  Edinburgh, November 4+7, 2006.

Referring to the  internet and web sites, Dave says:

"I think this IT is the best thing since sliced bread"

 

Recollections

12.

Bob Grant

Queensferry, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Grant for sending me his memories of Royston in the 1940s and 1950s.

Bob wrote:

Royston

"I was born at 19 Royston Mains Road, opposite Royston School, 'roond the corner' from the Embassy cinema, where my mother was a cleaner for many years when Mr Arnolds was the 'janny'.

I started Royston School in 1948, and lived in Royston all my teenage years, phew!! the nostalgia"

Shops

"I remember the newspaper shop was called Grants, no relation to me  -  pity!  My wee brother john and I would have welcomed free gobstoppers for the pictures."

The Embassy

"Oor mother would give us one shilling & sixpence  (1/6d) each to get into the Embassy.  Sometimes we could get an adult to take us in for half price.  If we were lucky, we could even end up in the balcony, whit a bonus!   - and with extra money to spend.

It was down to the Jubilee for 4d worth o' chips with plenty salt & sauce.  -  ahh, memories."

Bob Grant, Queensferry, Edinburgh: January 13, 2007

The Embassy

Thank you to Steven Oliver, Duns, Borders, Scotland for his more recent memories of the Embassy.

Steven wrote:

"My grandparents lived in an upper flat in a corner block with their front room facing towards the site of the old Embassy picture house – the hall window faced out on to Granton Congregational Church and Granton Primary School.

 Steven added:

"Alas, by the time I appeared, the Embassy was awaiting the wrecking ball, but I do remember the succession of supermarkets that occupied the site – Laws, Wm Low’s, Shoprite and finally Kwik Save.  A block of flats now, in turn, occupies its site! 

Steven Oliver, Duns, Borders, Scotland:  January 16, 2007

 

 

Recollections

13.

Hughie Grey

Australia

Thank you to Hughie Gray, Australia,  who used to live at 31 Granton Medway for sending his memories of Granton.

 E & M Ferry

  Edinburgh Waterfront  -  E & M Ferries Ltd hut at the entrance to Granton Harbour  -  4 August 2002 ©

This 'E & M Ferry hut can still be found on the left hand side of the road when entering Granton Harbour from Granton Square.

Ed Thomson, Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotland had previously told me that the hut was owned by Eddie and Maurice Ferry, haulage contractors.

Now, Hughie Gray, Australia, has written to tell me:

"Yes  Edward Ferry was  a good  bloke.  I was only a kid  and helped out on the trucks:

-  some days, it was carting the esparto grass

-  other times, it was  doing   the delivery  of Youngers'  beer."

Hughie also recalls other buildings nearby:

Middle Pier

"Just  behind  E & M Ferry's  offices  is where the  old torpedo boats  used to tie up  after the  war.  The stone  building  used to be Dinwoodie's,   ships' chandler.  I used to love the smell of the ropes.

  Alongside,  there was a  long white  hut.   I see it has gone  now. That's  where old ??? had his  office.  I think he may have been employed  by  Harbour Board,  I know he used to run the  launch to take people out to their boats,  and I made lots of pocket money  rowing them out on gala days.

 The paper shop  was at the entrance to the Pier, and futher along  was the  ship  breakers."

Shells

"I do worry about the  landfill that went into  the west  of  paper shop  as  I   saw  sulphur  and   shells  going in.  We kids got chased for safety  ha  ha.   But  we used  to  go back,  of course, make our own wee bombs.    I know now how stupid  but  we were kids."

Granton Square

"On Granton Square  there used to be the Post Office,  good for  sweeties.  We used to buy cinnamon sticks to smoke.  Yikes!

 I wonder if the old police box is still there.  I've  been in it  a couple of time   I even remember the  Policeman's  name.  It was 'Big Archie'  and he had a big  'back hand'.

We  were always getting caught   in the  railway yards  jumping on the wagons.   I lived in  Granton Medway   top stair   we had  great fun as kids.

Oor Wullie   couldnae  dae better,  eh."

Mum and Dad

"I just  found out, the  other day,  that my Mum who died in 1953  climbed up on the roof of the church hall  in  Granton Road , just  50 yards from the Square  when   Germans dropped a  flare on the roof  and set  fire to it during the  war.  She was in Civil  Defence.

Dad was the First Aid guy for Granton, Bill Gray.  He worked at the gasworks."

Move to Australia

"I live in Australia  now, in the Tropics.  I've  not had a pair of long trouser on in over a year and  I like it  warm.  But I still owe my roots  Granton.

When I think of all the  stuff I got up to  I should have  been locked up  must have had ADHD before they came up with that fancy name."

Hughie Gray, Australia,  March 5, 2007

 

Recollections

14.

John Clark

Canada

Thank you to John Clark, Canada, for sending these recollections of Granton.

John wrote:

 Parties

"Oh boy, this was all happy memories. My Auntie Jennie and Uncle Bob lived at 58 Granton Crescent, and did they like to party!"

Breakwater

"I made two very close friends on the landing above us, Ralph and Johnny Ross. We would go down to the breakwater and the pier, and catch partons with a length of string, a hook, and a mussel for bait, and these partons were enormous.

We would go to the end of the pier during a wild stormy night and take so many ridiculous chances. Ralph fell in a few times."

Bakery

"I remember the bakery along Lower Granton Road.  They didn't have a shop, but you could go to the small counter and buy hot rolls."

Mussels and Buckies

"We would go along the shore and collect more mussels and buckies than we could carry, but we would manage, then get home and cook them.  Oh, what a treat!"

Granton Square

"We were just up the hill and along from Granton Square, where there always seemed to be a great deal of Naval stuff going on in that big dark building.

I remember the barrage balloons, and the ack-ack guns down at the shore.  Oh boy, the sweet memories."

John Clark, Canada,  April 1, 2007

 

Recollections

15.

Graham Simpson

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Thank you to Graham Simpson for sending these recollections of Granton.

Graham wrote:

The Roll Shop

Lower Granton Road

"I remember the bakery on lower Granton Road well . As a  lad of perhaps nine to fourteen (1944-49) I or one of  my brothers, would be sent down to what we called 'the roll shop'.  It was on  Lower Granton Road, not far along from Granton Square and near Devlin's  office.  My dad was a chief  engineer  on several of Devlin's trawlers.

Postcard by an unidentified publisher  -  Looking to the east along Lower Granton Road ©

It was a fair hike from Pilton Place just south of  the Embassy Cinema on Boswall Parkway (now gone).

We bought the rolls mostly  on Sunday mornings but also on other occasions.

I remember very well  the delicious 'Aberdeen Butteries' that were made in this bakery and I have never tasted anything like them since.

The shop was a sort  of 'Hernando's Hideaway' since there was no visible signs of activity  or identity outside on the street and you went through a dark close  to a little hatch within a doorway (also without any identity) sometimes closed and sometimes open, and knocked or yelled for service.  Almost like a speakeasy!

Graham Simpson, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada:  September 7, 2007

 

Recollections

16.

Edwards' Bakery

Question

Jockey Sturgeon, Granton, Edinburgh also wrote about Edwards' Bakery.

Jockey asked:

"I was wondering if you knew anything about Mr Edwards and his bakery on Lower Granton Road.

It is no longer a bakery as it was used only for a post office when he retired.  It is now only a house.

I am looking for photos and more information from when it was a bakery.  I visited the bakery when I was just a lad and I was born in 1970.

Jockey Sturgeon  January 7, 2007

If you remember anything about the bakery, or have any photos of it, please e-mail me and I will pass on the information to Jockey.

Thank you.  -  Peter Stubbs

Answer 1

Thank you to John Stevenson, Trinity, Edinburgh, who answered:

"Ernest Edward ran the "Baker and Grocer" business at the shop (which later became a Post Office ) from around 1946.  From memory he lived in Portobello.

A relative (not sure of the relationship), James Edward,  operated a garage east of the Wardie Hotel ( - there is still one there now ) in the 1930's.

The business was best known for its "rolls". In the late '40's and '50's  people used  to go to there around midnight and buy rolls direct from the doorway of the bakery which was  behind the shop - I was one of their best customers at the weekends !!

They had a large "wholesale" trade in rolls , with at least two vans delivering around the town.

 If you think how well known "Mason's Pies" were a few years ago then "Edward's Rolls" were in the same category."

John D Stevenson, Trinity, Edinburgh:  January 9, 2007.

Answer 2

Thank you to Eddie Collie, Ontario, Canada who added:

"I just came across your article regarding Edwards Bakery in Granton and I may be able to add a few bits of information for you ."

The 'Works House'

"First. I was born in 1932 and actually lived in the 'works house' at TD Devlin's.  My father ,Charlie Collie, was the lorry driver for Devlin's and this is why we lived in the house."

Air Raids

"I have many memories of Edwards during the war as when there was an air raid all the people in the street were allowed to use Devlin's air raid shelter which was next to the bakery.

I should add that in these times as a kid we did not object to having air raids as it meant we could stay up late and did not have to go to school the next day until 10am.

The men would stand outside  together and the women would have a good gossip inside

The air raids lasted a reasonable time as it was usually the German planes going over to bomb Glasgow  so we had to wait till they made their return trip home."

Edwards' Bakery

"Where Edwards Bakery came in was that as kids we would get money from our mothers and run over to the actual (back shop) bakery and buy the rolls that were being made for the next day.  Did they taste good, wow!

I remember that my cousin from Canada was in Bomber Command and when the crew went on leave they would spend it with us. From what I heard at the dinner table my father had taken them in to Edwards one (could have been more) night and the family made the crew most welcome. I'm sure they had a few "nippy sweeties".  Unfortunately the crew were later killed over Germany.

Eddie Collie, North Bay, Ontario, Canada, September 9, 2007.

Answer 3

Thank you to Terry Russell, Sandwich, Kent who read Jockey Sturgeon's comments above, and replied to Jockey:

Growing up in Granton

"I was born in Edinburgh in 1959 and lived in Granton until I left for England 1973.  I can remember when I was a lad living in Granton, at Wardieburn Place South.  My playground was Granton Beach.

Edwards' Bakery

"I can remember walking past the roll shop and the smell was 'out of this world'.  Like you, I was sent there quite often to get half a dozen rolls, and I remember eating mine before I even got home."

Boxing

"I also can recall that there was a boxing training club along the road called the Bacloo club, I think (- spelling not good)."

Terry Russell, Sandwich, Kent:  September 2, 2008

 Terry added:

Granton Primary School

"I've just got back from Edinburgh, where I visited my old school,  Granton Primary.  Deputy head, Mrs Aldridge gave me and my brother, Paul, a guided tour.  It was fantastic.  The school has not changed a bit. It made my return home a very happy one."

Terry Russell, Sandwich, Kent:  September 11, 2008.

Answer 4

Thank you to Mike Chirnside who also read Jockey Sturgeon's comments above, and replied.

Mike wrote:

Growing up in Edinburgh

"I was born in the Elsie Inglis Memorial Maternity Hospital, Edinburgh, in 1956 and lived in Marchmont until 1961, when we moved to Blackhall."

Edwards' Bakery

"Whilst living at Blackhall, my Dad (an architect) used to work in Leith and discovered Edwards' Bakery - quite how, I know not!

He used to bring hot rolls home from the bakery on a regular basis, and especially went out to fetch them of a Sunday morning.  When I was old enough, I was often taken with him, sometimes at silly hours, just to try to hit the bakery as the hot rolls were coming out of the oven.

Sadly, the timings became more and more unreliable and we eventually gave up.  I still remember, however, the flour-covered floor, the tiles, the stone oven and the machinery for mixing dough and for pressing pies. I’m sure that the bakery was under the management of a George Edwards.

For years, we used to continue to buy rolls when in the area. Indeed, I joined HMS CLAVERHOUSE at Granton Square, near Edwards' Bakery, in 1973.  I bought rolls from the shop, though my visits to the bakery itself had, by then, become a thing of the past.

Edwards' Bakery lives on in my memory as producing, quite simply, the BEST rolls I have ever tasted - bar none!"

Mike Chirnside:  February 17, 2015

 

Recollections

17.

Bill Golder

East Wemyss, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Bill Golder for sending these recollections of Granton.

Bill wrote:

"I used to live in Granton Crescent,  I moved there from Arthur Street in 1939 just before the war started."

Riots

"I was only 4 at the time but I can still remember the riots when the war broke out, when certain people attacked the the fish and chip shop and the ice cream shop which belonged to the Demarco's when war broke out.

I remember the mounted police chasing the people along Granton Crescent and  chasing them right up into the stair and back out again.  It was very exciting for me as I could just see over the window sill."

Collecting Coal

"I remember the railway wagons parked outside Granton Harbour.  I used to have to collect bits of coal dropped off the trains when they were shunting.

I once got knocked down by one of the wagons being shunted, as it came up on me silently.  It hit me in the back, but being young I managed to scramble free before it ran over me."

Memories

Besides many other accidents throughout my life I am glad I am still here to read the many fascinating and nostalgic memories of Granton, where I was brought up.

I was able to identify with 90% of the memories of your previous correspondents.   I also remember the building in Granton Square which one of your previous people mentioned in connection with the Navy!   That was HMS Claverhouse which housed a Sea Cadet Company of which I was a member for quite a while. I could write a book with all my memories of Granton ,but I guess that is your job."

Bill Golder, East Wemyss, Fife, Scotland:  September 18, 2007

 

Recollections

18.

Archie Foley

Joppa, Edinburgh

Thank you to Archie Foley for sending these recollections of Granton.

Archie wrote:

"We moved to Granton Place in 1940 and I lived there until 1958 apart from two years away on National Service.

Shops

"Some contributors have mentioned the shops in Wardieburn Drive and Boswall Parkway; the barber was not Smeaton in my time although the name escapes me but Hardie was the grocer next door. ***

Williamson the fruiterers came next.  He also served fizzy Vantas drinks at a penny a time in cups and glasses that were anything but clean.

A branch of the Edinburgh and Dumfriesshire Dairy came between Williamson and the sweety shop, which then was Maxwells.

I always thought Richardson the drapers on the corner was a very superior establishment and that was where we bought my tie, belt and badge for Granton school.

The name of the chemist was  Brechin, but I can't remember who the drysalter was, between it and Black's the newsagent.

After the war Mr Black ran, what seemed to us,  a very swish cream coloured Sunbeam Talbot car that had presumably been garaged for the duration.

There was a Dentist, of whom I have painful memories, in a flat above these shops."

***  Thank you to James Munro who wrote:

"The name of the hairdresser was McLuskey."

James Munro, SW France: May 31, 2011

Milk Deliveries

 "I too delivered milk for the Leith Provident, and hard work it was pushing the heavy barrow round streets in Wardieburn in all weathers. In those days we were instructed that we had to get the empty bottles back when we delivered the milk even if it meant knocking at doors.

You can imagine the reaction we got from some folk who might be having a lie-in. Mind you, there were others who were very nice and apologized for their forgetfulness.

I gave up the milk job when the Sunday morning delivery was replaced by one on a Saturday afternoon as doing this would have meant I couldn't go to Easter Road to see Hibs"

Delivery Vans

"There were lots of grocery, bakers and other vans came round the streets then, plus the Ingin Johnnies on their bikes, of course.

Perhaps the most colourful were the fishwives and sellers of buckies and mussels but I also remember old Mr Gaff with his horse and cart selling fruit and vegetables. I think he lived in a caravan at West Granton on the site of Granton Castle. Eventually his son took over with a lorry."

Archie Foley, Joppa, Edinburgh:  September 22, 2007

 

Recollections

19.

John Clark

Canada

Thank you to John Clark, Canada, for sending more recollections of Granton.

John wrote:

Warships

"I spent a lot of my early youth at Granton Crescent  with my Aunty Jenny and Uncle Bob.  From their scullery window you could see all the warships in the Forth and the barrage balloons too."

Hens

"My Uncle Bob kept hens in the backgreen in home-made wooden cages."

Rolls

"When I was an older teenager, we would walk from the Palais on Fountainbridge after the dancing, all the way to the roll shop on Lower Granton Road.  It was a very long walk, but well worth it for these delicious rolls."

John Clark, Canada:  October 13, 2007

 

Recollections

20.

Florence Towell (née Birnie)

Thank you to Florence Towell, for sending more recollections of Granton.

Florence wrote:

Family and Schools

"I, too, grew up in Granton.  My family lived in Wardieburn Street West from the mid-'forties until my Mother died about 8 years ago.  Our name was Birnie, and I had two brothers, John and Charlie, and two sisters May and Lottie. 

We all went to Granton School, then on to Ainslie Park, Leith Academy and Broughton and The Royal High."

Bowling

"Before an untimely early death, my Father worked at the Gasworks.  I remember so well him playing lawn bowling in Granton.

Sports

"Kick-the-can and rounders were our main "sports" then -  also listening to the wireless and, of course, lots of books from Granton library.  I remember thinking I must have read every single book they had then.

Concerts

"My sister, May, had dancing classes and we used to have backgreen concerts;  my Mother would make Fairy cakes and toffee cups and we would charge 2d admission."

Magic Lantern

"The Magic Lantern in Granton Square was where we used to go, one evening a week.  The movies they showed were so gory I don't know how we could watch them.   But, it was entertainment.

My Mother used to give us pennies for our collection, but we always saved one penny to buy a hot roll from the baker in Granton Square.  That was the highlight of the evening."

Florence Towell (née Birnie):  October 29, 2007

Florence:  Since receiving your e-mail with your recollections of Granton (above) I've tried, 3 times, to send you e-mails thanking you, but all have been rejected  -  so if you are reading this message, I'll say now "Thank you for your contribution to the web site."

 

Recollections

21.

Stuart McCann

Swifts Creek, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Stuart McCann for sending me his recollections of Granton.

Stuart wrote:

Granton Trawlers

   Granton Steam Trawler, Daily Chronicle, operated byT L Devlin Ltd, Granton ©

"I've just read the recollections of Graham Simpson (15 above) about Granton and TL Devlin's trawlers.

Graham said that his dad was an engineer on some of Devlin's boats. I'm just wondering if his dad would have been Billie Simpson, with whom I sailed a couple of times.

If so, then one of my best pals from fishing days, James Simpson (son of Jimmy Simpson), would have been Graham's cousin.  We both went trawling out of Granton.

Australia and New Zealand

"I left the sea in Jan 1951, and joined the Australian Army in London. No way was I going to pay £10 to emigrate!  So I was paid every fortnight on the ship coming to Australia.

James also left the sea to go to New Zealand.  We caught up again when we were both home for a visit at the same time.  Sadly, James passed away in Auckland NZ, some years ago now, but Graham's recollections started old memories again.

Leather Whip

If I'm right in my assumptions, I recall vividly Graham's Aunt Aggie, Jimmie's wife taking a leather whip from South Africa to James and me after one of our schoolboy capers.

Thankfully, she never could quite catch us as we fled down the stairs and over the railway wall nearby, but I'm here to say, she was one of the fastest housewives on two legs!"

Stuart McCann, Swift' Creek, Victoria, Australia:  January 8, 2008

 

Recollections

22.

Stuart McCann

Swifts Creek, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Stuart McCann for writing again.  Stuart wrote:

Granton Trawlers

"Reading Walter Lyle Hume's story of his first trip aboard a trawler he refers to the "parcel" of fish he was given to take ashore at the end of the trip.

That was the "pochle" that we were all allowed to take home."

Stuart McCann, Swift' Creek, Victoria, Australia:  January 9, 2008

 

Recollections

23.

Stuart McCann

Swifts Creek, Victoria, Australia

Stuart McCann added

Skipper 'Janders'

"In 1949, I signed on the trawler 'Princess Mary'  out of Granton, a TL Devlin boat, with a skipper who I will refer to, by his 'bye name' as many trawlermen were in those days.

Well,  Janders was a bit of a wild man, but a good skipper so I was lucky to get a berth with him.  He had a terrible tongue on him and the BBC had warned him several times for swearing on the wireless.

Rough and ready he would not hesitate to put a boot up the backside of any lad who was a bit slow on deck.  He certainly sharpened my footwork up a few times."

Accident

"Round in the Minch  on the west coast we were hauling up the cod end on the winch when the strop broke, and the large steel hook swung down  on me and split my head open. The damage wasn't too severe as I must have flung myself back as it came down.  However, Janders, with much cursing, decided to take us into Tobermory on Mull to have my head stitched up since it wasn't too far away.

When he and I arrived at the doctor's they both had a close look. After much headshaking  and muttering they agreed that several stitches were required, and that a dram before starting might be a good idea.

This cheered me up somewhat, until I realised that the drams were for the skipper and the doctor! I was definitely not included!  'It wouldna be guid fur me!'."

Later, in Australia

"The sequel to this wee yarn and others, caused me some embarrassment some years later in Australia.

My wife had met a young housewife like herself, who came from Scotland some years earlier.  Her mother was out visiting, and since she was about my age we decided we would all have dinner together.

After a few drams I was regaling the company with stories of fishing days.  I told them a few yarns about Janders. The mother asked me what Janders' name was.  I was hard put to remember. She then told me her older brother was a skipper out of Granton and his name was -------- .  Well, of course then I remembered Janders' real name!  Your right!  She was Janders little sister! Talk about embarrassed! But she was laughing so much it was easy to be forgiven.

I'm sure Janders will have found a safe berth by now, but wherever he is  I'm grateful  for what I learned at, and from, his feet."

Stuart McCann, Swift' Creek, Victoria, Australia:  January 10, 2008

 

Recollections

24.

Bob Grant

Queensferry, Edinburgh

Bob Grant wrote:

Esparto Grass Ships

"I sailed three times to North Africa from Granton on the esparto grass ships. These were the coal burning ships:

ss Uskmouth' and

ss Esk Mouth'.

(ss means steam ship)

I lasted 21 years at sea, and they were great times."

Bob Grant:  Queensferry, Edinburgh:  March 8, 2009

 

Recollections

25.

Tom Orme
Lincolnshire, England

Tom Orme wrote:

Question

Philip Anderson & Co

"I am searching for information relating to Phillips Anderson & Co Ltd of Granton.  Do you have any recollection of this company?  They were boat builders in the 1940s.

I am currently restoring one of 24 identical boats built for the admiralty between 1943 and 1946.  10 of them were built by Phillips Anderson in Granton, the other 14 by Groves and Guttridge of Cowes on the Isle of White.

My boat was built by G&G. I've managed to find some information about the G&G boats but sadly nothing about the boats built in Granton.  Despite extensive searching on the Internet I can find only one reference to the company and boats built by the company.

If you have any information or photos relating to Phillips Anderson & Co Ltd or can put me in contact with someone who may be able to help I would appreciate it."

Tom Orme:  March 17, 2009

 

Recollections

26.

Norrie Stanton
Boswall, Edinburgh

Thank you to Norrie Stanton for adding this reply to a message in the EdinPhoto guest book.

Norrie wrote:

Philip Anderson & Co

"I am Ian's wee bruvr from Boswall Ave.  (Ian Stanton was born in 1940).

I knew an Eddie Skeene Williamson McKenzie who lived in Boswall Terrace.  He was a tall blond guy who always had a Roy Rogers outfit and a silver cap pistol.   He went around with my brother, Ian."

Norrie Stanton, Boswall, Edinburgh:  April 17, 2009, replying to a message from Robert E Williamson (Eddie) posted in the EdinPhoto guest book on April 6, 2009

 

Recollections

27.

Bob Grant

Queensferry, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Grant who used to lived at Royston Mains Road for writing again.

Bob wrote:

Request for Photos

"I would be very happy if someone could send more pics of Royston and Granton.

There must be a lot out there;:

the back green concerts

-  bonfires

-  mussel woman who used be in every street

rag men with trumpets

-  Mr Kelly, the Royston chimney sweep.

-  Royston Mains Road:  the back greens there were full of hen runs.

 Please send your pictures."

Bob Grant:  Queensferry, Edinburgh:  August 4, 2009

Hi Bob:

Fewer poeple had cameras in the 1940s and 1950s than now, but let's hope that somebody finds a few old photos of the Royston / Granton area and is able to scan them and email them to me for the EdinPhoto web site.

Peter Stubbs:  August 4, 2009

 

 Recollections

28.

John Clark

Canada

Thank you to John Clark, Canada, who wrote:

Buckies

"I just had to comment on the  message from GM Rigg.

 When I was living with my Aunty Jenny at 58 Granton Crescent, my pals who lived above us were Johnnie and Ralphie Ross. We would go down to the harbour with two large buckets each, and gather as many buckies and mussels as we could carry.  What a treat!

 I have lived in Canada now for 47 years, and we sometimes go to a nice restaurant called the Mandarin, where you can eat all the mussels you want and crab legs and lobster and a myriad of sea food.  It still doesn't compare with good old Granton. God bless Granton and all my beautiful memories."

John Clark, Canada,  April 1, 2007

 

This is the message that John refers to.

 GM Rigg wrote:

Buckies

"The fish monger at the top of Broughton Street sold hot fresh buckies by the bag when I was a kid - you either love them or hate them.

The other place you could by them hot & fresh was at Portobello beach.  For some reason, they always came with vinegar at the beach.

All the shellfish are delicacies now but were considered poor folks food then & you never admitted to eating them."

Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book: September 5, 2009

 

Recollections

29.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for sending more memories from the time that he lived near Granton and Royston

Bob wrote:

Royston Internment Camp

"As you went northwards from the end of Crewe Road North there was a cottage and then a dirt track road that led down to the sea. Royston House was down that way and so was the Internment Camp which housed German Prisoners of War

A man called Bill Douglas stayed with us as a lodger.  He had named his  daughters  Gail and Shelia because he didn't want to forget their names.  (He came from Galashiels!)  He was sent to teach the Germans some trade or other.

He had a car!  Nobody else in the avenue had one and Pilton Avenue was a long avenue.  Bill told us that he learnt more from the POW's than he ever taught them.  They made wooden toys for the poor of the district, and I think they were employed in stitching mailbags."

United Wire Works

"If you caught the No.17 single decker bus from Granton Square, you would get a seat, because it was one stop before where the wire workers got on.  Once they had got on the bus on, it was a fight if you wanted to get off as they were 'packed like herring in a barrel'."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  December 8, 2009

Recollections

30.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for writing again.

Bob wrote:

Fish Suppers

"I remember fish suppers from the fish shop at the bottom of Crewe Road North, not all that far from the Gas Works and the Wire Works.

The name, fish suppers, suggests that these delicacies were designed to be consumed in the latter part of the evening.  But our local Fish and Chipperies opened at lunch time - possibly because there were large works in the near vicinity.  People used to come in and order a fish supper about 12.30pm. 

A 'fish supper'  The name did eventually change to 'fish and chips', though it took a while.

You always insisted that the fish supper be wrapped in news-paper because that's how real men ate it, and you could read a bit of the paper once you were finished the meal.  But the newspaper wrappings disappeared, with the advent of butchers paper wrapping, which was nowhere near as interesting."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  February 5, 2010

Recollections

31.

Catherine Meakes
(
née Mackenzie)

Berkshire, England

Ship Yard Worker

Philip Mackenzie

Catherine Meakes wrote

Granton

"I was born in Granton in 1945, and had two brothers and a baby sister

I wonder if anybody can help me find more information about my father.  He was Phillip  Mackenzie.  My mother was Alice Mackenzie.

 My father worked in the ship yards and my Birth Certificate says he was a boiler scaler.  He died of cancer aged 32 yrs, I think in Jan 1952.

I'd love to know what he was like because I don't know if what I remember (which is very little) is real or a fantasy.

I remember he used to play football with his work mates.  He would carry me on his shoulders down to the fieldI used to run around.  (I know he adored me.)  That's about all I remember, apart from him dying .

Please, if anyone can help me I would be very grateful."

Catherine Meakes (née Mackenzie), Berkshire, England:  February 16, 2010

Catherine emailed me again,  giving a little more information.  She wrote:

Tollcross and Sighthill

"I remember that my mother took us all to a hovel in Tollcross, Edinburgh.  A place called Sighthill, Edinburgh, also comes to mind.  I think I may have been there for a year or so.  Then my mother put my brothers, sisters and myself into care and I was sent to Aberdeen.

Catherine Meakes, (née Mackenzie), Berkshire, England:  March 10, 2010

Reply to Catherine Meakes?

If you remember Philip Mackenzie, or know anything about  him, and would like to send a reply to Catherine, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to her.

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  March 10, 2010

Reply to

Recollections

31.

David Welsh

East Lothian, Scotland

Ship Yard Worker

Philip Mackenzie

David Welsh replied:

Website

"I  lost parents very early and found a fantastic helpful free website and forum called www.rootschat.com

Perhaps the people there may be able to assist Catherine."

David Welsh, East Lothian, Scotland:  March 10, 2010

 Thank you David.   I've now passed on your message to Catherine.)

Recollections

32.

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young) for leaving this message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Avril wrote:

Martin's Shipyard

"I was interested to read the recollections of Bob Sinclair and Douglas Beath

Douglas mentions Martin's Shipyards. I visited there a few times and was at a couple of launchings too.  Back then, I lived opposite Martins and was a good friend of their daughter, Elizabeth.  Hence my visiting the Shipyard."

Schools

"What eventually became Ainsley Park School?  For most of my time, it was what we called 'The Foundies'.  I wonder if others remember the place.

I lived at the top of Crewe Place and went to Royston School in 1941, then on to Bellevue.  I've been trying to make contact with old school friends from Royston

The headmaster at Royston was Mr. Walker and my last teacher there was Mr. Henderson.  I'd love to hear from anyone who remembers that time."

19 Buses

"Ann Watson mentioned about the '19 buses'.  Does anyone remember Sadie?  How could you forget her if you travelled on that busI'm sure many stories could be told about the times on the 19 buses and the many characters, conductors and drivers.

Embassy Cinema

"It was very sad to see what happened to the Embassy cinema,  I used to go there twice a week with my Mum, sometimes going into McCall's too."

"So many very happy memories of my time living in that area."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, March 22, 2010

Reply to Avril

If you'd like to send a reply to Avril, please

EITHER: add a reply her under the message that she left in the guestbook on March 22, 2010

        OR:   email me, then I'll pass on your message to Avril.

Thank you.    Peter Stubbs:  March 27, 2010

Recollections

33.

Jennifer Gare (née Hamilton)

Broomhouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Jennifer Gare (née Hamilton) for leaving this message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Jennifer wrote:

Ainsley Park School

"I went to Ainsley Park School form 1960 to1963.

l walked to school, every day, from my home in Wester Drylaw Drive.   I remember some of the teachers there:

Miss Hay who was a maths teacher

-  Miss Blyth who was the girls gym teacher."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, March 22, 2010

I don't have an email address for Avril, but you should be able to leave a reply
for her under the message that she left in the guestbook on March 22, 2010.

Recollections

34.

James Munro

SW France

Thank you to James Munro for sending me the recollections below.  James tells me that he used to live at Granton Grove (very upmarket!) but has not been back to Edinburgh for about 30 years.

James wrote:

1946-49

Granton Beach

"We used to spend a lot of happy hours on the rocks at Granton Beach, catching crabs of a pretty insignificant size.   There was also a railway embankment running from Newhaven to Granton Harbour with  a large sewage outlet  -  if you sat quietly there appeared enormous rats. 

There was the Wardie Hotel and next to that, a little bakery that, just at the foot of Wardie Steps, a little bakery that sold magnificent rolls at 7pm."

West Harbour Road

"On the road to West Granton Pier, just after the war, there was a surplus war material dump where you could pick up floats, and once a large military revolver with the hammer removed.

You could visit the esparto grass boats and see tarantula spiders in the off-loaded bales.   All very nostalgic but now seems trivial."

James Munro, SW France: August 15+16, 2010

Today

Thanks for the comments, James.  If you returned to the Granton and Leith 'Waterfront' now you'd notice a few changes.

-  Granton beach has probably not changed much since you last saw it.

-  The old railway embankment was taken down a few years ago and has become a footpath (McKelvie Parade).

-  The old sewage pipe has gone and a small sewage pumping station has been built at McKelvie Parade, at the junction of Lower Granton Road and Trinity Road.

-   Wardie Steps are probably as you remember them, but the bakery has gone.

-   Wardie Hotel has been renovated and converted to housing.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  August 16, 2010

Recollections

35.

Frank Ferri

Newhaven, Edinburgh

Thank you to Frank Ferri who added:

The Shoreline

"The shoreline from Granton to Newhaven has certainly changed.  Granton, in the old days, had a large fishing fleet of trawlers.

The pumping station built a few years ago by East of Scotland Water at McKelvie Parade, as the western sewage interceptor, taking sewage to the works at Seafield, has cleaned up the area greatly.  The water at Wardie Bay is now a safer place to paddle.

Up to the 1960s, fishing boats were able to land their catch on the east side of Newhaven fishmarket before the land was reclaimed and used for the offshore oil pipe-coating plant of Bredero Price.  The land is now occupied by housing and an Asda supermarket."

Esparto Grass

"I remember the esparto grass boats at Granton very well, having sailed on one in the early 1950s.  It was the 'Peldale'.  The cargo came from Arzew in Algeria North Africa.

In fact, on one trip we had more than a cargo of grass.  In Arzew, there was a Foreign Legion Fort.  Three Legionnaires, trying to desert,  were found by their officers hiding among our deck cargo of grass.  Poor devils I dread to think what happened to them."

Frank Ferri, Newhaven, Edinburgh:  August 17, 2010

Recollections

36.

Harry Flannigan

New Zealand

Thank you to Harry Flannigan who wrote:

Gypsy Brae

"It takes me back to when we used to  help ourselves to coal down Gipsy Brae to keep the home fires burning.  That was not far from the Granton Gas works near Flemings the dye works at the Royston beach shoreline."

Andrew Boath

"I hope my old mate Andrew Boath is still active with his Bruce Peebles trips, I served my time there."

Harry Flannigan, New Zealand:  February 13, 2011

Harry:

You mentioned Andrew Boath.  He is still living at Granton and is now very active with the Granton History Group.  The group is collecting information on the Granton area and holds a programme of talks on the area.  Andrew is President of the group.  I've passed your message on to him.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 13, 2011

Recollections

37.

James Munro

Le Tonkin, SW France

Thank you to James Munro for writing again.

James wrote:

Embassy Cinema

"I lived in no. 6 Granton Grove. 

Saturday afternoons were strictly reserved for a matinee at the Embassy.  It was 5p in the stalls and 9p on the balcony (from where you could hurl your ice cream carton on to those unfortunates in the stalls).

To get in to the cinema, one would pay, then when the lights dimmed he (or she) would attempt to open the emergency doors to admit their friends.

Films

Sometimes, when a rather upmarket serious film was scheduled, the manager would take the stage and ask all the youngsters to be quiet during the showing  -  a complete waste of time!

The sought-after films were those with Gene Autry, Charles Starrett (The Durango Kid), Hopalong Cassidy, etc.    Boy, were we innocent.

I remember the perfume they used to spray around.

At one of the Edinburgh Festivals, Yehudi Menuhin offered to do a concert at the Embassy 'for the ordinary people'.  The cinema was totally filled with the usual suspects.

James Munro, Le Tonkin, SW France, 2011

Recollections

38.

Iain C Purves

Waterdown, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to C Purves who wrote:

Granton Trawlers

"Alex Dow (10 above) spoke of the trawlers in Granton Harbour.

My uncle 'Big Geordie' Main, was a trawler skipper.  He sailed for:

-  Thomas Liston

Carnie and Gibb

Walter Paton

Devlin's

 to name but a few."

Trawler Radio Band

'Big Geordie' Main

"The photo on one of the pages of Annfield and the tenements of Hawthorne Vale brought back even more memories.

Newhaven Streets  -  Annfield Promenade  - A Valentine Postcard ©

George Main lived in No.8 the Vale, in a top-flat house with a terrific view all the way to Granton Harbour.

Our family had table radios with a 'Trawler Band'.  We used to listen for 'Big Geordie' as he came up the Forth.  I was sent to meet the boat and bring home the 'pauchel', usually a decent sized cod.

The family moved from Hawthorne Vale to No.6 Annfield, where I helped out by scraping the 6 coats of wallpaper off the house walls.

In this photo, a few doors along from No.6 is Gibbie Hare's pub where my Dad, Jackie Purves, worked evenings as a barman."

Iain C Purves, Waterdown, Ontario, Canada:  October 3, 2011

 

Recollections

39.

Dorothy Finlay

Queensland, Australia

Dorothy Finlay wrote in the EdinPhoto guestbook:

Shops at Crewe Road North

"Someone  wrote of the row of shops on the corner of Crewe Road North and Boswall Parkway.  I went to school with Eleanor, one of the girls from Irvin's.  She married the footballer, Billy Stevenson.

They had the drysalter's shop.  I think there were 5 girls.

I lived in Crewe Road West.  I'd love to hear from anyone who remembers me from Ainsley Park School."

Dorothy Finlay, Queensland, Australia:  October 2, 2011

Recollections

40.

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Avril Finlayson Smith replied to Dorothy's message in 39 above:

Shops at Crewe Road North

"Hi Dorothy.  I lived at the top of Crewe Place.  My brother went to Ainslie Park school, but I went to Bellevue after Royston.

I think I might well have been the person that wrote about the shops on the corner of Crewe Road North and Boswall Parkway."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, October 17,, 2010

 

Recollections

Granton, Boswall, Royston

   Postcard by an unidentified publisher  -  Looking to the east along Lower Granton Road ©

since the

1940s

1.

Hugh Hainley
Midlothian, Scotland

Thanks

Granton Square

Fizzy Drinks and Chocolate

Granton Quarry

Military Vehicles

"Highland Laddie"

2.

Alastair Berry
Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Middle Pier

3.

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

with replies from

Douglas Beath
Tasmania, Australia

Elizabeth Baillie (née Martin)
near Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England

Bob Sinclair
Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)
Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Rev. Deborah Cornish
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

Food and Drink

Martin's Shipyard

Granton School

19 Bus

Granton Beach

Middle Pier

Granton Square

The Embassy

Granton Methodist Church

4.

Donald Campbell Veale
South-east Kent, England

The Embassy

Granton School

5.

Monica Shaw
Boswall, Edinburgh

Old homes

New home

6.

Ann Watson
Edinburgh

Granton Crescent

Granton School

Around Granton Harbour

Trains and Buses

7.

Duncan Shedden
Shetland, Scotland

The Embassy

8.

John Ross  - known as Ian Ross
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

Concerts

Toffee for 1d

Hay & Co, High St and Granton

9

Sandra Newlands
Orkney Islands, Scotland

Granton School Photo

10

Alex Dow
Fife, Scotland

Granton Station

Northern Lighthouse Board

U-Boat

RAF High-Speed Launches

Coal for the Trawlers

Granton Ice Factory

Esparto Grass

11

Dave Woolard
Edinburgh

Granton Ferries

The Square Centre Youth Club

Snow Sliding

12

Bob Grant
Queensferry, Edinburgh

 with reply from

Steven Oliver
Duns, Borders, Scotland

Royston

Shops

The Embassy

13

Hughie Grey
Australia

E & M Ferry

Middle Pier

Shells

Granton Square

Mum and Dad

Move to Australia

14

John Clark
Canada

Parties

Breakwater

Bakery

Mussels and Buckies

Granton Square

15

Graham Simpson
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Lower Granton Road  Roll Shop

16

Jockey Sturgeon
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

with replies from

John Stevenson  Answer 1
Trinity, Edinburgh

and

Eddie Collie  Answer 2
Ontario, Canada

and

Terry Russell  Answer 3
Sandwich, Kent

Lower Granton Road  Roll Shop

17

Bill Golder
East Wemyss, Fife, Scotland

Riots

Collecting Coal

Memories

18

Archie Foley
Joppa, Edinburgh

Shops

Milk Deliveries

Delivery Vans

19

John Clark
Canada

Warshiops

Hens

Rolls

20

Florence Towell (née Birnie)

Family and Schools

Bowling

Sports

Concerts

Magic Lantern

21

Stuart McCann

Granton Trawlers

22

Stuart McCann

Granton Trawlers

Australia and New Zealand

Leather Whip

23

Stuart McCann

Skipper 'Janders'

Accident

Leather Whip

24

Bob Grant
Queensferry, Edinburgh

Skipper 'Janders'

Accident

Leather Whip

25

Tom Orme
Lincolnshire, England

Philip Anderson & Co - Question

26

Norrie Stanton
Boswall, Edinburgh

Eddie Skeene as Roy Rogers

27

Bob Grant
Queensferry, Edinburgh

Request for Photos

28

John Clark
Canada

Buckies

29

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

Royston Internment Camp

United Wire Works

30

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

Fish Suppers

31

Catherine Meakes
(
née Mackenzie)

Berkshire, England

and reply from

David Welsh
East Lothian, Scotland

Ship Yard Worker
  -  Philip Mackenzie

32

Avril Finlayson Smith
(née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Martin's Shipyard

Schools

19 Buses

The Embassy

33

Jennifer Gare (née Hamilton)
Broomhouse, Edinburgh

Ainsley Park School

34

James Murno
SW France

1946-49

-  Granton Beach

-  West Harbour Road

35

Frank Ferri
Newhaven, Edinburgh

The Shoreline

Esparto Grass

35

Harry Flannigan
New Zealand

Gypsy Brae

Andrew Boath

37

James Murno
Le Tonkin, SW France

Embassy Cinema

Films

38

Iain C Purves
Waterdown, Ontario, Canada

Granton Trawlers

Trawler Radio Band

39

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar)
Waterdown, Ontario, Canada

Shops at Crewe Road North

40

Avril Finlayson Smith
(née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Shops at Crewe Road North

Please scroll down to read more or click one of the links above.

 

Recollections

1.

Hugh Hainley

Midlothian, Scotland

Thank you to Duncan Shedden who was born in Lochinvar Camp, Wardie, in 1946 and now lives in Shetland.

Duncan wrote: 

Thanks

Many thanks, for bringing back so many boyhood memories of Old Granton. I started School at St David's West Granton Rd about 1942.

Granton Square

The square was a hive  of activity. Granton Harbour was the HQ of the Northern Minesweepers.

Just outside the Harbour was a row of Wood built shops.  One shop was a Café where you could get a hot pie and gravy with mashed tatties.

Further along if you could evade the Military Sentries were Yards full of cordite and all sorts of ammo and military stores.

Fizzy Drinks and Chocolate

I remember when the road opened after the war.  There was a hut called Grannie Smiths where you could buy Fizzy Drinks.

There was also a Tar Factory and a Chocolate Works although chocolate was still on ration

Granton Quarry

Just up the road a bit was Granton Quarry.  It had a very high cliff with a small ridge running along the top. About half way round was a set of Gates which were the back gates to Caroline House.

For a dare I would often climb this cliff and then over the gates into the house.

Military Vehicles

In the park there was hundreds of military vehicles.  I think this was for the D Day Landings.

We used to have great fun dodging the soldiers who were on guard.  I was caught a few times and was caned.  I held the School Record for the most caned boy in one day. This was the only thing I ever achieved at school.

"Highland Laddie"

One last wee story. It would be the summer of 1943, Morning Playtime.  I was looking through the railings of St David's school playground  at the bottom West Granton Road. This squad of soldiers came marching down West Granton Road turned left into the Square halted and stood at ease.

I escaped from the playground and ran behind the soldiers.  One of them gave me a bar of bitter black chocolate.

They were then stood down for a ten minute smoking break and this soldier began to sing 'Highland Laddie' I was hooked from that moment on, all I ever wanted to be was a soldier"

P.S. -  Yes I did become a soldier, for 25 years  -  and yes I got a belting for leaving the school playground."

Hugh Hainey, Loanhead, Midlothian, Scotland:  March 2005

 

Recollections

2.

Alastair Berry

Vancouver Island, British Columbia

Thank you to Alastair Berry for the recollections below:

Middle Pier

"After the War, around 1947-48, there used to be a boatman "OLD MAC" who  provided a well appreciated  service, in the days  before  out board  motors  became available.

He rowed the Royal Forth Yacht Club members out to their boats and generally 'keep an eye on them' during the week.

He used the slip on Middle Pier, and as I remember it he was rewarded for his endeavours with slugs of Whisky so that by late on a Saturday evening  his rowing became  rather erratic"

Alastair Berry, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Recollections

3.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for the recollections below, in response to comments by Hugh Hainley (above):

Food and Drink

"I also remember Granny Smith's hut. It was a bit dark inside and a bit of an Aladdin's cave for anybody after a few sweets or a drink."

Douglas Beath adds:

"I remember Granny Smith's cabin on the shore road near Caroline Park. The sign lettering was done with lemonade bottle caps nailed up."

Douglas Beath,  Tasmania adds:

"I have an idea that there was a sign for (Dunbar's?) lemonade factory not far from the middle pier.

Another couple of  places frequented by the workers down that way was the local watering hole "The Anchor Inn", and Demarcos where you could get a lovely ice cream. 

Demarco himself was a very good snooker player and had a number of tables at the back of the shop."

Martin's Shipyard

"Also going the other way towards Leith, there was a small shipyard James Martin & Son, who I believe were commandeered to build small naval craft during the second world war.

I knew Jimmy Martin's son Graham** who lived just up the road from me as did the Joiner foreman, a Mr Fleming.  We all lived in Pilton Avenue."

**   Reply 1

Elizabeth Baillie (née Martin) wrote:

Martin's Shipyard

"In the paragraph above, Bob Sinclair (who I used to know him as Robert, when he was a boy) mentions my father's business, James Martin & Son, Granton.

In fact, my brother's name was James, not Graham."

Elizabeth Baillie (née Martin), nr Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England:  December 24, 2012

Reply 2

     Bob Sinclair replied:

Martin's Shipyard

"Thank you, Elizabeth.  Of course, you are right about James' name.  I was getting confused with Graham Harvey who lived at the other side of the school entrance, downstairs."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  December 25, 2012

Reply 3

     Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young) replied:

Elizabeth

"I was just reading this snippet where James Martin & Son's was mentioned, and got such a lovely surprise to see a reply from the daughter of James Martin (Elizabeth Baillie, now).  I just couldn't believe my eyes after all those years.

I lived opposite the Martins and Elizabeth was one of my friends, when we were little, she and Eileen Rose and I often played together, sometimes I think Doreen Granton did too

At some point she lived next door to Elizabeth. I am hoping Elizabeth you might read this and would really love to hear from you again. Often wondered where you were and how life worked out for you. I believe Elizabeth also knew my husband, Tom Smith, at some time!

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young):  Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia:
Message posted in Edinphoto Guestbook, December 26, 2012

I've sent an email to Avril today, giving her Elizabeth's email address.
Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh, December 26, 2012

 

Granton School

"I had to go to Granton School one day - I think it was for an injection.

The distance from the main entrance on Boswall Parkway to the school entrance must have been one of the longest in any school. I was tired by the time I got to the school.

Adjoining the school was Granton Library where you could silently look for exciting books on Schoolboy adventures. Usually they were all out and there was a waiting list."

Granton school is still in use, with library round the back. The school is now looking smart with newly painted signs and a wooden boat, wooden train and tables and chairs in the area in front of the school.

   -  Peter Stubbs

19 Bus

"I remember going up the flights of steps from Granton Square to get the 19 bus which left from the top of the steps. I am sure that in the early days the 19 Bus drivers saw you coming and took off when you had about fifty yards to go. It can't have been sheer co-incidence each time."

Granton Beach

"Going on to Granton beach was a work of art in the summertime. If you were in your "baries" you had to watch where you put them or there was tar to scrape off your feet."

Middle Pier

"Some of the boys used to go to the Middle pier when the boats came in and the sailors occasionally unloaded fish.

If they were not in a generous mood we used to take our piece of cane and nail-attach a part of winkle and try to catch a fish.

I think we ever only caught one and threw it back out of pity for its size."

Granton Square

"It was fascinating sitting down at the square with a bag of sweets we bought between us watching the various trams coming and going.

Granton Square

    Trams at Granton Square  ©

There was also a single decker No.17 bus (it had a smell all it's own) which ran form the square to near the West End  and stopped outside McVities.

West End

    Tram at the West End of Princes Street ©

It was a bit of a boon to many who worked in the Wire Works."

The Embassy

"Then there was the local Flea Pit as we lovingly called it - the Bassy or the Embassy Picture House.

I once got to go Upstairs, because my mother who worked in Mackies as a waitress, was given a couple of complimentary tickets by a customer.

Later on when I had a little bit more guile I joined the band of a few kids who could only afford to in downstairs. At the end of the cartoons and supporting feature us kids made at rush at the upstairs doors and if lucky stayed there until the big picture was finished.

Some of us made it each time. Those who were lucky got out before the National Anthem was played - it was a real downer especially after a serial on a Saturday morning.

I know there was a sweet shop either side and I think one was McColls but I can't remember the name of the other. 

The real fun was when the Air Raid Siren went off. Was it located on top of the Police box just across from the Bassy?"

Granton Methodist Church

"As it happens I was married in Granton Methodist church which I believe no longer exists - such is life!"

Reply

After reading the comment above concerning Granton Methodist Church, Rev. Deborah Cornish  e-mailed to tell me that the church does still in fact exist.

Deborah wrote:

Granton Methodist Church

In September 2004 I was appointed by the Methodist Church to be the minister in charge at Granton Methodist Church.

However, in August 2004 it formally become a combined church, when it formed a partnership with Granton United Reform Church (previously the Congregational Church).

It is still alive and well, and looking forward to the future.

Rev. Deborah Cornish:  Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.  8 June 2005

 

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia  -  27 April 2005

 

Recollections

4.

Donald Campbell Veale

South-East Kent, England

Thank you to Donald Campbell Veale for the following:

The Embassy

What memories!  I have a lump in the throat: the Embassy where I ran on to the stage to belt the Wizard of Oz.

Granton School

Granton school got a mention  still going strong with a great bunch of Teachers.

Not open for play  in the evening as it used to be.  Playing with the guns from the amo trucks was great fun.

Donald Campbell Veale, South-East Kent, England

 

Recollections

5.

Monica Shaw

Boswall, Edinburgh

Thank you to Monica Shaw for the message left in the EdinPhoto Guest Book, including the following:

Old Homes

I was first brought home as a baby to 32 Boswall Quadrent , then at 5 years moved to 19 Boswall Terrace till I was 24.

The poshness !!  talked of from very early on to get into Boswall was still very much around.

No-one talked of houses being council, or the struggle to survive and to 'keep up with the Jones ' inside those homes.

The struggle and the 'feeling of being home' has never left me.

New Home

I am, in 2 weeks time I will be returning to Boswall, moving into my new home with my daughter at 4 Boswall Grove.

'home'   'Boswall'  !!

I will be looking on to 10 Boswall grove were my mother was brought, Josephine Mulhern and sisters Maureen Mulhern and little June also brother Andrew Mulhern.

Monica Shaw, Boswall, Edinburgh

 

Recollections

6.

Ann Begbie (née Watson)

Edinburgh

Thank you to Ann Begbie (née Watson) for the following message.  Ann lived at Carnegie Street, then moved to Granton Medway in 1938, then to 37 Granton Crescent.

Granton Crescent

"I lived at 37 Granton Crescent.  The house had a marvellous view of the harbour but the view has been lost now." 

This is the result of new housing being built around Granton which is on the edge of the Edinburgh Waterfront development.

Granton School

"My brothers and I went to Granton school.  The schools were closed at some time during the war, and Miss Birrel would come to the house to give out homework and collect it

Around Granton Harbour

"I remember the hut, and Flemings ink works and the red water.

I remember the businesses in Lower Granton Road:

-  Lewis's electricians was where my father worked during the war.

-   Mrs Lindsay's sweet shop was where people used to hand in sweet coupons if they never used them.

We used to go there for our rations and we had to wait till the shop was empty before we collected ours as she gave us extra from the handed-in coupons.

Trains and buses

Does anyone remember:

- a train that caught fire it had chocolate in it,  most of which melted before the fire was put out?

-  the bus drivers on the 19 buses would start the engines, then after you had run for the bus would switch the engine off when you stepped on the platform.

-  a conductress called Sadie?
If you were in her good books she never charged the proper fare.

Ann Begbie (née Watson), Edinburgh:  22 November 2005

 

Recollections

7.

Duncan Shedden

Shetland, Scotland

Thank you to Duncan Shedden, who was born in Lochinvar Camp, Granton, and now lives in Shetland for the following

The Embassy

I knew the old Embassy Picture House quite well. If I remember there was an R S McCall's sweet shop at one side and a paper shop at the other.

Oh for the days of the old 'ABC Minors' on a Saturday morning!

Duncan Shedden, Shetland, Scotland: December 10 + 13, 2005

 

Recollections

8.

John Ross

Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

  John Ross and his Grandparents ©

Thank you to John Ross (also known as Ian Ross), now living in Peterborough, England for the following.

Ian lived at 55 Pilton Crescent and attended Granton Primary School from the early 1940s, then David Kilpatrick School at Leith.

John wrote: 

Concerts

"I recall concerts in Granton School playground and in Pilton Park by some type of theatre group.

I remember a grumpy old park keeper who looked after Pilton park and used to try to keep us in order ."

Toffee for 1d

"There  was a lady living in ground floor of tenement house, I think by the name of Moriarty,  who used to make toffee in cake paper cups and we used to buy them from open window, one penny each.  These were such a treat as we did not have many sweets. This was near School and we went to her at playtime."

Hay & Co

High Street and Granton

"My father managed a grocer shop named Hay &  Co in High St, Edinburgh,  opposite John Knox House.

©

His friend managed the  branch in Granton.  I recall going there on Saturdays to collect our weekly rations.  My father was in the army then."

John (Ian) Ross, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England: June 21-30, 2006

John adds:

"It is wonderful to bring back all these memories.  It makes you feel real emotional."

John wrote again, telling me:

"This photo was taken about 1920.  My father is on the left."

John (Ian) Ross, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England: July 28, 2009

 

Recollections

9.

Sandra Newlands

Orkney, Scotland

Thank you to Sandra Newlands for sending me this old photograph of a class at Granton School.  Please click on the image below  to enlarge the picture.

Sandra writes:

Granton School

   A school class at Granton School in the 1940s or early 1950s. ©

"Here is a photograph of a class from Granton School, probably taken in the 1940s or early 1950s.  The teacher in this photo is now aged 86.  Do you recognise the teacher?"

If you recognise the teacher,  can you please e-mail me Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs

 

Recollections

10.

Alex Dow

Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Alex Dow, for the following recollections of Granton, and for his recollections of Granton in the 1930s and 1950s.

Alex wrote: 

Granton Station

"Around 1940, we may have travelled to Granton by special boat train, as the Harbour Station had been closed to normal traffic for several years.

 The station had served the Granton-Burntisland Train Ferry, which operated from quite early in the railway era until some time after the Forth Bridge opened in 1890.

As the ferry carried freight wagons only, the passengers had to walk from the station to board the ferry at the railway slip-way."

Northern Lighthouse Board

"My second early memory of Granton is of being aboard one of the Northern Lighthouse Board's tenders, possibly the Pharos; and seeing the mixed nature of its work.

The cabins for the lighthouse crews could be on board for up to three weeks as the vessel worked its way around the Scottish coast and the Isle of Man, plus the holds for the provisions, spares etc.  -  very graceful vessels."

U-Boat

"That was followed by visiting a German U-boat, U776, about June 1945."

"This submarine was captured late in the war; and was re-commissioned in the Royal Navy, sailing up and around Britain, calling at various ports, to let the general public see what a Type 7 U-boat was like - very cramped even for a nine-year-old. Some photos of it have appeared in books in recent years."

RAF High-Speed Launches

"Like another contributor, I recollect MTBs and RAF high-speed launches being worked on at the small shipyard in the corner by the East Breakwater."

Coal for the Trawlers

"In that period, Granton was still a major fishing port and most of the boats were steam driven, using coal. Towards the outer end of the Middle Pier was the Coal Hoist, with loaded and unloaded tracks serving it.

Several trucks would be pushed to the landward side of the hoist on the loaded track. The shunting locomotive would move back to the main sidings to carry on with other works.

The shunters would first unhook all the trucks, connect a cable from an electric windlass to the furthest away truck, then slowly wind the cable in intermittently, to place the leading loaded truck in the coal hoist, rather like moving it on to a weighbridge, which it also was.

That truck would be lifted up the hoist and tipped over sideways at the top, discharging the coal into the hoist's hopper, from which an adjustable conveyor belt carried the coal out over a fishing boat tied up on the west side of the pier."

'Black Stoor'

"The coal was dropped down flexible metal tubes to the boat's bunkers, rather like the plastic tubes seen on some demolition sites today.  Black stoor everywhere!

The hoist returned the emptied wagon to ground level, the shunter re-engaged the windlass to draw the remaining loaded trucks forward, pushing the emptied truck out on the seaward side.

Here the track dipped abruptly, to accelerate the emptied truck downwards then up over a set of trailing points to the buffered stub set a short distance above normal ground level.

The wagon rebounded of the buffers, down the stub; but at the points, it would move on to the other, unloaded track, to be caught by a slow-moving chain conveyor with large teeth protruding at intervals.

These teeth would engage with one or other of the wagon's axles, slowing it down but continuing to propel it to buffer up to the trucks unloaded earlier, which would be pushed forwards/inland by one truck's length as the newly-arrived truck came to a halt at the end of the chain.

Once all the trucks had been unloaded etc, the shunter would re-couple them, the loco would return and remove those unloaded trucks to the sidings further inland."

Granton Ice Factory

"About mid-way along the Middle Pier was the Granton Ice Factory. This produced ice which was also delivered by conveyer belt to the fishing boats,

I'm not sure whether this was before or after coaling, probably before as the coal hoist was nearer the harbour mouth."

Esparto Grass

"The West Pier saw many boats in from North Africa with Esparto Grass for high-quality paper-making, taken by train out to the mills strung out along the Water of Leith from Slateford to Balerno.

In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the rail yard along the foreshore between the Middle and West Piers was a mass of condemned wagons."

Alex Dow:  September 10, 2006

 

Recollections

11.

Dave Woolard

Edinburgh

Thank you to Dave Woolard who recalls Granton in the late-1940s and early-1950s.

Dave wrote:

Granton Ferries

"I remember before we flitted from Arthur Street in Edinburgh to Granton. 

We used to get on a  No 8 tram with my Mum and Dad and brother's, going to Granton Square, then walk along the pier and get on the Willie Muir.  I also remember the other ferry, Thane o Fife."

The Square Centre Youth Club

"I remember going to the Square Centre Youth Club on Thursday nights.  It was a wooden hut just up from Granton Square.  We had some great times.

I'm not too sure, but I think the hut is still there. After we came out we would go round to the bakers on Lower Granton Road and buy hot rolls. Happy times"

Snow Sliding

"Another memory is of the winters in the snow; sliding down the hill between Granton  Crescent and St David's school on the curved bits of the Anderson Shelters. 

There were one or two mishaps crashing into the railings at the bottom."

Dave Woolard:  Edinburgh, November 4+7, 2006.

Referring to the  internet and web sites, Dave says:

"I think this IT is the best thing since sliced bread"

 

Recollections

12.

Bob Grant

Queensferry, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Grant for sending me his memories of Royston in the 1940s and 1950s.

Bob wrote:

Royston

"I was born at 19 Royston Mains Road, opposite Royston School, 'roond the corner' from the Embassy cinema, where my mother was a cleaner for many years when Mr Arnolds was the 'janny'.

I started Royston School in 1948, and lived in Royston all my teenage years, phew!! the nostalgia"

Shops

"I remember the newspaper shop was called Grants, no relation to me  -  pity!  My wee brother john and I would have welcomed free gobstoppers for the pictures."

The Embassy

"Oor mother would give us one shilling & sixpence  (1/6d) each to get into the Embassy.  Sometimes we could get an adult to take us in for half price.  If we were lucky, we could even end up in the balcony, whit a bonus!   - and with extra money to spend.

It was down to the Jubilee for 4d worth o' chips with plenty salt & sauce.  -  ahh, memories."

Bob Grant, Queensferry, Edinburgh: January 13, 2007

The Embassy

Thank you to Steven Oliver, Duns, Borders, Scotland for his more recent memories of the Embassy.

Steven wrote:

"My grandparents lived in an upper flat in a corner block with their front room facing towards the site of the old Embassy picture house – the hall window faced out on to Granton Congregational Church and Granton Primary School.

 Steven added:

"Alas, by the time I appeared, the Embassy was awaiting the wrecking ball, but I do remember the succession of supermarkets that occupied the site – Laws, Wm Low’s, Shoprite and finally Kwik Save.  A block of flats now, in turn, occupies its site! 

Steven Oliver, Duns, Borders, Scotland:  January 16, 2007

 

 

Recollections

13.

Hughie Grey

Australia

Thank you to Hughie Gray, Australia,  who used to live at 31 Granton Medway for sending his memories of Granton.

 E & M Ferry

  Edinburgh Waterfront  -  E & M Ferries Ltd hut at the entrance to Granton Harbour  -  4 August 2002 ©

This 'E & M Ferry hut can still be found on the left hand side of the road when entering Granton Harbour from Granton Square.

Ed Thomson, Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotland had previously told me that the hut was owned by Eddie and Maurice Ferry, haulage contractors.

Now, Hughie Gray, Australia, has written to tell me:

"Yes  Edward Ferry was  a good  bloke.  I was only a kid  and helped out on the trucks:

-  some days, it was carting the esparto grass

-  other times, it was  doing   the delivery  of Youngers'  beer."

Hughie also recalls other buildings nearby:

Middle Pier

"Just  behind  E & M Ferry's  offices  is where the  old torpedo boats  used to tie up  after the  war.  The stone  building  used to be Dinwoodie's,   ships' chandler.  I used to love the smell of the ropes.

  Alongside,  there was a  long white  hut.   I see it has gone  now. That's  where old ??? had his  office.  I think he may have been employed  by  Harbour Board,  I know he used to run the  launch to take people out to their boats,  and I made lots of pocket money  rowing them out on gala days.

 The paper shop  was at the entrance to the Pier, and futher along  was the  ship  breakers."

Shells

"I do worry about the  landfill that went into  the west  of  paper shop  as  I   saw  sulphur  and   shells  going in.  We kids got chased for safety  ha  ha.   But  we used  to  go back,  of course, make our own wee bombs.    I know now how stupid  but  we were kids."

Granton Square

"On Granton Square  there used to be the Post Office,  good for  sweeties.  We used to buy cinnamon sticks to smoke.  Yikes!

 I wonder if the old police box is still there.  I've  been in it  a couple of time   I even remember the  Policeman's  name.  It was 'Big Archie'  and he had a big  'back hand'.

We  were always getting caught   in the  railway yards  jumping on the wagons.   I lived in  Granton Medway   top stair   we had  great fun as kids.

Oor Wullie   couldnae  dae better,  eh."

Mum and Dad

"I just  found out, the  other day,  that my Mum who died in 1953  climbed up on the roof of the church hall  in  Granton Road , just  50 yards from the Square  when   Germans dropped a  flare on the roof  and set  fire to it during the  war.  She was in Civil  Defence.

Dad was the First Aid guy for Granton, Bill Gray.  He worked at the gasworks."

Move to Australia

"I live in Australia  now, in the Tropics.  I've  not had a pair of long trouser on in over a year and  I like it  warm.  But I still owe my roots  Granton.

When I think of all the  stuff I got up to  I should have  been locked up  must have had ADHD before they came up with that fancy name."

Hughie Gray, Australia,  March 5, 2007

 

Recollections

14.

John Clark

Canada

Thank you to John Clark, Canada, for sending these recollections of Granton.

John wrote:

 Parties

"Oh boy, this was all happy memories. My Auntie Jennie and Uncle Bob lived at 58 Granton Crescent, and did they like to party!"

Breakwater

"I made two very close friends on the landing above us, Ralph and Johnny Ross. We would go down to the breakwater and the pier, and catch partons with a length of string, a hook, and a mussel for bait, and these partons were enormous.

We would go to the end of the pier during a wild stormy night and take so many ridiculous chances. Ralph fell in a few times."

Bakery

"I remember the bakery along Lower Granton Road.  They didn't have a shop, but you could go to the small counter and buy hot rolls."

Mussels and Buckies

"We would go along the shore and collect more mussels and buckies than we could carry, but we would manage, then get home and cook them.  Oh, what a treat!"

Granton Square

"We were just up the hill and along from Granton Square, where there always seemed to be a great deal of Naval stuff going on in that big dark building.

I remember the barrage balloons, and the ack-ack guns down at the shore.  Oh boy, the sweet memories."

John Clark, Canada,  April 1, 2007

 

Recollections

15.

Graham Simpson

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Thank you to Graham Simpson for sending these recollections of Granton.

Graham wrote:

The Roll Shop

Lower Granton Road

"I remember the bakery on lower Granton Road well . As a  lad of perhaps nine to fourteen (1944-49) I or one of  my brothers, would be sent down to what we called 'the roll shop'.  It was on  Lower Granton Road, not far along from Granton Square and near Devlin's  office.  My dad was a chief  engineer  on several of Devlin's trawlers.

Postcard by an unidentified publisher  -  Looking to the east along Lower Granton Road ©

It was a fair hike from Pilton Place just south of  the Embassy Cinema on Boswall Parkway (now gone).

We bought the rolls mostly  on Sunday mornings but also on other occasions.

I remember very well  the delicious 'Aberdeen Butteries' that were made in this bakery and I have never tasted anything like them since.

The shop was a sort  of 'Hernando's Hideaway' since there was no visible signs of activity  or identity outside on the street and you went through a dark close  to a little hatch within a doorway (also without any identity) sometimes closed and sometimes open, and knocked or yelled for service.  Almost like a speakeasy!

Graham Simpson, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada:  September 7, 2007

 

Recollections

16.

Edwards' Bakery

Question

Jockey Sturgeon, Granton, Edinburgh also wrote about Edwards' Bakery.

Jockey asked:

"I was wondering if you knew anything about Mr Edwards and his bakery on Lower Granton Road.

It is no longer a bakery as it was used only for a post office when he retired.  It is now only a house.

I am looking for photos and more information from when it was a bakery.  I visited the bakery when I was just a lad and I was born in 1970.

Jockey Sturgeon  January 7, 2007

If you remember anything about the bakery, or have any photos of it, please e-mail me and I will pass on the information to Jockey.

Thank you.  -  Peter Stubbs

Answer 1

Thank you to John Stevenson, Trinity, Edinburgh, who answered:

"Ernest Edward ran the "Baker and Grocer" business at the shop (which later became a Post Office ) from around 1946.  From memory he lived in Portobello.

A relative (not sure of the relationship), James Edward,  operated a garage east of the Wardie Hotel ( - there is still one there now ) in the 1930's.

The business was best known for its "rolls". In the late '40's and '50's  people used  to go to there around midnight and buy rolls direct from the doorway of the bakery which was  behind the shop - I was one of their best customers at the weekends !!

They had a large "wholesale" trade in rolls , with at least two vans delivering around the town.

 If you think how well known "Mason's Pies" were a few years ago then "Edward's Rolls" were in the same category."

John D Stevenson, Trinity, Edinburgh:  January 9, 2007.

Answer 2

Thank you to Eddie Collie, Ontario, Canada who added:

"I just came across your article regarding Edwards Bakery in Granton and I may be able to add a few bits of information for you ."

The 'Works House'

"First. I was born in 1932 and actually lived in the 'works house' at TD Devlin's.  My father ,Charlie Collie, was the lorry driver for Devlin's and this is why we lived in the house."

Air Raids

"I have many memories of Edwards during the war as when there was an air raid all the people in the street were allowed to use Devlin's air raid shelter which was next to the bakery.

I should add that in these times as a kid we did not object to having air raids as it meant we could stay up late and did not have to go to school the next day until 10am.

The men would stand outside  together and the women would have a good gossip inside

The air raids lasted a reasonable time as it was usually the German planes going over to bomb Glasgow  so we had to wait till they made their return trip home."

Edwards' Bakery

"Where Edwards Bakery came in was that as kids we would get money from our mothers and run over to the actual (back shop) bakery and buy the rolls that were being made for the next day.  Did they taste good, wow!

I remember that my cousin from Canada was in Bomber Command and when the crew went on leave they would spend it with us. From what I heard at the dinner table my father had taken them in to Edwards one (could have been more) night and the family made the crew most welcome. I'm sure they had a few "nippy sweeties".  Unfortunately the crew were later killed over Germany.

Eddie Collie, North Bay, Ontario, Canada, September 9, 2007.

Answer 3

Thank you to Terry Russell, Sandwich, Kent who read Jockey Sturgeon's comments above, and replied to Jockey:

Growing up in Granton

"I was born in Edinburgh in 1959 and lived in Granton until I left for England 1973.  I can remember when I was a lad living in Granton, at Wardieburn Place South.  My playground was Granton Beach.

Edwards' Bakery

"I can remember walking past the roll shop and the smell was 'out of this world'.  Like you, I was sent there quite often to get half a dozen rolls, and I remember eating mine before I even got home."

Boxing

"I also can recall that there was a boxing training club along the road called the Bacloo club, I think (- spelling not good)."

Terry Russell, Sandwich, Kent:  September 2, 2008

 Terry added:

Granton Primary School

"I've just got back from Edinburgh, where I visited my old school,  Granton Primary.  Deputy head, Mrs Aldridge gave me and my brother, Paul, a guided tour.  It was fantastic.  The school has not changed a bit. It made my return home a very happy one."

Terry Russell, Sandwich, Kent:  September 11, 2008.

 

Recollections

17.

Bill Golder

East Wemyss, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Bill Golder for sending these recollections of Granton.

Bill wrote:

"I used to live in Granton Crescent,  I moved there from Arthur Street in 1939 just before the war started."

Riots

"I was only 4 at the time but I can still remember the riots when the war broke out, when certain people attacked the the fish and chip shop and the ice cream shop which belonged to the Demarco's when war broke out.

I remember the mounted police chasing the people along Granton Crescent and  chasing them right up into the stair and back out again.  It was very exciting for me as I could just see over the window sill."

Collecting Coal

"I remember the railway wagons parked outside Granton Harbour.  I used to have to collect bits of coal dropped off the trains when they were shunting.

I once got knocked down by one of the wagons being shunted, as it came up on me silently.  It hit me in the back, but being young I managed to scramble free before it ran over me."

Memories

Besides many other accidents throughout my life I am glad I am still here to read the many fascinating and nostalgic memories of Granton, where I was brought up.

I was able to identify with 90% of the memories of your previous correspondents.   I also remember the building in Granton Square which one of your previous people mentioned in connection with the Navy!   That was HMS Claverhouse which housed a Sea Cadet Company of which I was a member for quite a while. I could write a book with all my memories of Granton ,but I guess that is your job."

Bill Golder, East Wemyss, Fife, Scotland:  September 18, 2007

 

Recollections

18.

Archie Foley

Joppa, Edinburgh

Thank you to Archie Foley for sending these recollections of Granton.

Archie wrote:

"We moved to Granton Place in 1940 and I lived there until 1958 apart from two years away on National Service.

Shops

"Some contributors have mentioned the shops in Wardieburn Drive and Boswall Parkway; the barber was not Smeaton in my time although the name escapes me but Hardie was the grocer next door. ***

Williamson the fruiterers came next.  He also served fizzy Vantas drinks at a penny a time in cups and glasses that were anything but clean.

A branch of the Edinburgh and Dumfriesshire Dairy came between Williamson and the sweety shop, which then was Maxwells.

I always thought Richardson the drapers on the corner was a very superior establishment and that was where we bought my tie, belt and badge for Granton school.

The name of the chemist was  Brechin, but I can't remember who the drysalter was, between it and Black's the newsagent.

After the war Mr Black ran, what seemed to us,  a very swish cream coloured Sunbeam Talbot car that had presumably been garaged for the duration.

There was a Dentist, of whom I have painful memories, in a flat above these shops."

***  Thank you to James Munro who wrote:

"The name of the hairdresser was McLuskey."

James Munro, SW France: May 31, 2011

Milk Deliveries

 "I too delivered milk for the Leith Provident, and hard work it was pushing the heavy barrow round streets in Wardieburn in all weathers. In those days we were instructed that we had to get the empty bottles back when we delivered the milk even if it meant knocking at doors.

You can imagine the reaction we got from some folk who might be having a lie-in. Mind you, there were others who were very nice and apologized for their forgetfulness.

I gave up the milk job when the Sunday morning delivery was replaced by one on a Saturday afternoon as doing this would have meant I couldn't go to Easter Road to see Hibs"

Delivery Vans

"There were lots of grocery, bakers and other vans came round the streets then, plus the Ingin Johnnies on their bikes, of course.

Perhaps the most colourful were the fishwives and sellers of buckies and mussels but I also remember old Mr Gaff with his horse and cart selling fruit and vegetables. I think he lived in a caravan at West Granton on the site of Granton Castle. Eventually his son took over with a lorry."

Archie Foley, Joppa, Edinburgh:  September 22, 2007

 

Recollections

19.

John Clark

Canada

Thank you to John Clark, Canada, for sending more recollections of Granton.

John wrote:

Warships

"I spent a lot of my early youth at Granton Crescent  with my Aunty Jenny and Uncle Bob.  From their scullery window you could see all the warships in the Forth and the barrage balloons too."

Hens

"My Uncle Bob kept hens in the backgreen in home-made wooden cages."

Rolls

"When I was an older teenager, we would walk from the Palais on Fountainbridge after the dancing, all the way to the roll shop on Lower Granton Road.  It was a very long walk, but well worth it for these delicious rolls."

John Clark, Canada:  October 13, 2007

 

Recollections

20.

Florence Towell (née Birnie)

Thank you to Florence Towell, for sending more recollections of Granton.

Florence wrote:

Family and Schools

"I, too, grew up in Granton.  My family lived in Wardieburn Street West from the mid-'forties until my Mother died about 8 years ago.  Our name was Birnie, and I had two brothers, John and Charlie, and two sisters May and Lottie. 

We all went to Granton School, then on to Ainslie Park, Leith Academy and Broughton and The Royal High."

Bowling

"Before an untimely early death, my Father worked at the Gasworks.  I remember so well him playing lawn bowling in Granton.

Sports

"Kick-the-can and rounders were our main "sports" then -  also listening to the wireless and, of course, lots of books from Granton library.  I remember thinking I must have read every single book they had then.

Concerts

"My sister, May, had dancing classes and we used to have backgreen concerts;  my Mother would make Fairy cakes and toffee cups and we would charge 2d admission."

Magic Lantern

"The Magic Lantern in Granton Square was where we used to go, one evening a week.  The movies they showed were so gory I don't know how we could watch them.   But, it was entertainment.

My Mother used to give us pennies for our collection, but we always saved one penny to buy a hot roll from the baker in Granton Square.  That was the highlight of the evening."

Florence Towell (née Birnie):  October 29, 2007

Florence:  Since receiving your e-mail with your recollections of Granton (above) I've tried, 3 times, to send you e-mails thanking you, but all have been rejected  -  so if you are reading this message, I'll say now "Thank you for your contribution to the web site."

 

Recollections

21.

Stuart McCann

Swifts Creek, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Stuart McCann for sending me his recollections of Granton.

Stuart wrote:

Granton Trawlers

   Granton Steam Trawler, Daily Chronicle, operated byT L Devlin Ltd, Granton ©

"I've just read the recollections of Graham Simpson (15 above) about Granton and TL Devlin's trawlers.

Graham said that his dad was an engineer on some of Devlin's boats. I'm just wondering if his dad would have been Billie Simpson, with whom I sailed a couple of times.

If so, then one of my best pals from fishing days, James Simpson (son of Jimmy Simpson), would have been Graham's cousin.  We both went trawling out of Granton.

Australia and New Zealand

"I left the sea in Jan 1951, and joined the Australian Army in London. No way was I going to pay £10 to emigrate!  So I was paid every fortnight on the ship coming to Australia.

James also left the sea to go to New Zealand.  We caught up again when we were both home for a visit at the same time.  Sadly, James passed away in Auckland NZ, some years ago now, but Graham's recollections started old memories again.

Leather Whip

If I'm right in my assumptions, I recall vividly Graham's Aunt Aggie, Jimmie's wife taking a leather whip from South Africa to James and me after one of our schoolboy capers.

Thankfully, she never could quite catch us as we fled down the stairs and over the railway wall nearby, but I'm here to say, she was one of the fastest housewives on two legs!"

Stuart McCann, Swift' Creek, Victoria, Australia:  January 8, 2008

 

Recollections

22.

Stuart McCann

Swifts Creek, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Stuart McCann for writing again.  Stuart wrote:

Granton Trawlers

"Reading Walter Lyle Hume's story of his first trip aboard a trawler he refers to the "parcel" of fish he was given to take ashore at the end of the trip.

That was the "pochle" that we were all allowed to take home."

Stuart McCann, Swift' Creek, Victoria, Australia:  January 9, 2008

 

Recollections

23.

Stuart McCann

Swifts Creek, Victoria, Australia

Stuart McCann added

Skipper 'Janders'

"In 1949, I signed on the trawler 'Princess Mary'  out of Granton, a TL Devlin boat, with a skipper who I will refer to, by his 'bye name' as many trawlermen were in those days.

Well,  Janders was a bit of a wild man, but a good skipper so I was lucky to get a berth with him.  He had a terrible tongue on him and the BBC had warned him several times for swearing on the wireless.

Rough and ready he would not hesitate to put a boot up the backside of any lad who was a bit slow on deck.  He certainly sharpened my footwork up a few times."

Accident

"Round in the Minch  on the west coast we were hauling up the cod end on the winch when the strop broke, and the large steel hook swung down  on me and split my head open. The damage wasn't too severe as I must have flung myself back as it came down.  However, Janders, with much cursing, decided to take us into Tobermory on Mull to have my head stitched up since it wasn't too far away.

When he and I arrived at the doctor's they both had a close look. After much headshaking  and muttering they agreed that several stitches were required, and that a dram before starting might be a good idea.

This cheered me up somewhat, until I realised that the drams were for the skipper and the doctor! I was definitely not included!  'It wouldna be guid fur me!'."

Later, in Australia

"The sequel to this wee yarn and others, caused me some embarrassment some years later in Australia.

My wife had met a young housewife like herself, who came from Scotland some years earlier.  Her mother was out visiting, and since she was about my age we decided we would all have dinner together.

After a few drams I was regaling the company with stories of fishing days.  I told them a few yarns about Janders. The mother asked me what Janders' name was.  I was hard put to remember. She then told me her older brother was a skipper out of Granton and his name was -------- .  Well, of course then I remembered Janders' real name!  Your right!  She was Janders little sister! Talk about embarrassed! But she was laughing so much it was easy to be forgiven.

I'm sure Janders will have found a safe berth by now, but wherever he is  I'm grateful  for what I learned at, and from, his feet."

Stuart McCann, Swift' Creek, Victoria, Australia:  January 10, 2008

 

Recollections

24.

Bob Grant

Queensferry, Edinburgh

Bob Grant wrote:

Esparto Grass Ships

"I sailed three times to North Africa from Granton on the esparto grass ships. These were the coal burning ships:

ss Uskmouth' and

ss Esk Mouth'.

(ss means steam ship)

I lasted 21 years at sea, and they were great times."

Bob Grant:  Queensferry, Edinburgh:  March 8, 2009

 

Recollections

25.

Tom Orme
Lincolnshire, England

Tom Orme wrote:

Question

Philip Anderson & Co

"I am searching for information relating to Phillips Anderson & Co Ltd of Granton.  Do you have any recollection of this company?  They were boat builders in the 1940s.

I am currently restoring one of 24 identical boats built for the admiralty between 1943 and 1946.  10 of them were built by Phillips Anderson in Granton, the other 14 by Groves and Guttridge of Cowes on the Isle of White.

My boat was built by G&G. I've managed to find some information about the G&G boats but sadly nothing about the boats built in Granton.  Despite extensive searching on the Internet I can find only one reference to the company and boats built by the company.

If you have any information or photos relating to Phillips Anderson & Co Ltd or can put me in contact with someone who may be able to help I would appreciate it."

Tom Orme:  March 17, 2009

 

Recollections

26.

Norrie Stanton
Boswall, Edinburgh

Thank you to Norrie Stanton for adding this reply to a message in the EdinPhoto guest book.

Norrie wrote:

Philip Anderson & Co

"I am Ian's wee bruvr from Boswall Ave.  (Ian Stanton was born in 1940).

I knew an Eddie Skeene Williamson McKenzie who lived in Boswall Terrace.  He was a tall blond guy who always had a Roy Rogers outfit and a silver cap pistol.   He went around with my brother, Ian."

Norrie Stanton, Boswall, Edinburgh:  April 17, 2009, replying to a message from Robert E Williamson (Eddie) posted in the EdinPhoto guest book on April 6, 2009

 

Recollections

27.

Bob Grant

Queensferry, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Grant who used to lived at Royston Mains Road for writing again.

Bob wrote:

Request for Photos

"I would be very happy if someone could send more pics of Royston and Granton.

There must be a lot out there;:

the back green concerts

-  bonfires

-  mussel woman who used be in every street

rag men with trumpets

-  Mr Kelly, the Royston chimney sweep.

-  Royston Mains Road:  the back greens there were full of hen runs.

 Please send your pictures."

Bob Grant:  Queensferry, Edinburgh:  August 4, 2009

Hi Bob:

Fewer poeple had cameras in the 1940s and 1950s than now, but let's hope that somebody finds a few old photos of the Royston / Granton area and is able to scan them and email them to me for the EdinPhoto web site.

Peter Stubbs:  August 4, 2009

 

 Recollections

28.

John Clark

Canada

Thank you to John Clark, Canada, who wrote:

Buckies

"I just had to comment on the  message from GM Rigg.

 When I was living with my Aunty Jenny at 58 Granton Crescent, my pals who lived above us were Johnnie and Ralphie Ross. We would go down to the harbour with two large buckets each, and gather as many buckies and mussels as we could carry.  What a treat!

 I have lived in Canada now for 47 years, and we sometimes go to a nice restaurant called the Mandarin, where you can eat all the mussels you want and crab legs and lobster and a myriad of sea food.  It still doesn't compare with good old Granton. God bless Granton and all my beautiful memories."

John Clark, Canada,  April 1, 2007

 

This is the message that John refers to.

 GM Rigg wrote:

Buckies

"The fish monger at the top of Broughton Street sold hot fresh buckies by the bag when I was a kid - you either love them or hate them.

The other place you could by them hot & fresh was at Portobello beach.  For some reason, they always came with vinegar at the beach.

All the shellfish are delicacies now but were considered poor folks food then & you never admitted to eating them."

Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book: September 5, 2009

 

Recollections

29.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for sending more memories from the time that he lived near Granton and Royston

Bob wrote:

Royston Internment Camp

"As you went northwards from the end of Crewe Road North there was a cottage and then a dirt track road that led down to the sea. Royston House was down that way and so was the Internment Camp which housed German Prisoners of War

A man called Bill Douglas stayed with us as a lodger.  He had named his  daughters  Gail and Shelia because he didn't want to forget their names.  (He came from Galashiels!)  He was sent to teach the Germans some trade or other.

He had a car!  Nobody else in the avenue had one and Pilton Avenue was a long avenue.  Bill told us that he learnt more from the POW's than he ever taught them.  They made wooden toys for the poor of the district, and I think they were employed in stitching mailbags."

United Wire Works

"If you caught the No.17 single decker bus from Granton Square, you would get a seat, because it was one stop before where the wire workers got on.  Once they had got on the bus on, it was a fight if you wanted to get off as they were 'packed like herring in a barrel'."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  December 8, 2009

Recollections

30.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for writing again.

Bob wrote:

Fish Suppers

"I remember fish suppers from the fish shop at the bottom of Crewe Road North, not all that far from the Gas Works and the Wire Works.

The name, fish suppers, suggests that these delicacies were designed to be consumed in the latter part of the evening.  But our local Fish and Chipperies opened at lunch time - possibly because there were large works in the near vicinity.  People used to come in and order a fish supper about 12.30pm. 

A 'fish supper'  The name did eventually change to 'fish and chips', though it took a while.

You always insisted that the fish supper be wrapped in news-paper because that's how real men ate it, and you could read a bit of the paper once you were finished the meal.  But the newspaper wrappings disappeared, with the advent of butchers paper wrapping, which was nowhere near as interesting."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  February 5, 2010

Recollections

31.

Catherine Meakes
(
née Mackenzie)

Berkshire, England

Ship Yard Worker

Philip Mackenzie

Catherine Meakes wrote

Granton

"I was born in Granton in 1945, and had two brothers and a baby sister

I wonder if anybody can help me find more information about my father.  He was Phillip  Mackenzie.  My mother was Alice Mackenzie.

 My father worked in the ship yards and my Birth Certificate says he was a boiler scaler.  He died of cancer aged 32 yrs, I think in Jan 1952.

I'd love to know what he was like because I don't know if what I remember (which is very little) is real or a fantasy.

I remember he used to play football with his work mates.  He would carry me on his shoulders down to the fieldI used to run around.  (I know he adored me.)  That's about all I remember, apart from him dying .

Please, if anyone can help me I would be very grateful."

Catherine Meakes (née Mackenzie), Berkshire, England:  February 16, 2010

Catherine emailed me again,  giving a little more information.  She wrote:

Tollcross and Sighthill

"I remember that my mother took us all to a hovel in Tollcross, Edinburgh.  A place called Sighthill, Edinburgh, also comes to mind.  I think I may have been there for a year or so.  Then my mother put my brothers, sisters and myself into care and I was sent to Aberdeen.

Catherine Meakes, (née Mackenzie), Berkshire, England:  March 10, 2010

Reply to Catherine Meakes?

If you remember Philip Mackenzie, or know anything about  him, and would like to send a reply to Catherine, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to her.

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  March 10, 2010

Reply to

Recollections

31.

David Welsh

East Lothian, Scotland

Ship Yard Worker

Philip Mackenzie

David Welsh replied:

Website

"I  lost parents very early and found a fantastic helpful free website and forum called www.rootschat.com

Perhaps the people there may be able to assist Catherine."

David Welsh, East Lothian, Scotland:  March 10, 2010

 Thank you David.   I've now passed on your message to Catherine.)

Recollections

32.

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young) for leaving this message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Avril wrote:

Martin's Shipyard

"I was interested to read the recollections of Bob Sinclair and Douglas Beath

Douglas mentions Martin's Shipyards. I visited there a few times and was at a couple of launchings too.  Back then, I lived opposite Martins and was a good friend of their daughter, Elizabeth.  Hence my visiting the Shipyard."

Schools

"What eventually became Ainsley Park School?  For most of my time, it was what we called 'The Foundies'.  I wonder if others remember the place.

I lived at the top of Crewe Place and went to Royston School in 1941, then on to Bellevue.  I've been trying to make contact with old school friends from Royston

The headmaster at Royston was Mr. Walker and my last teacher there was Mr. Henderson.  I'd love to hear from anyone who remembers that time."

19 Buses

"Ann Watson mentioned about the '19 buses'.  Does anyone remember Sadie?  How could you forget her if you travelled on that busI'm sure many stories could be told about the times on the 19 buses and the many characters, conductors and drivers.

Embassy Cinema

"It was very sad to see what happened to the Embassy cinema,  I used to go there twice a week with my Mum, sometimes going into McCall's too."

"So many very happy memories of my time living in that area."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, March 22, 2010

Reply to Avril

If you'd like to send a reply to Avril, please

EITHER: add a reply her under the message that she left in the guestbook on March 22, 2010

        OR:   email me, then I'll pass on your message to Avril.

Thank you.    Peter Stubbs:  March 27, 2010

Recollections

33.

Jennifer Gare (née Hamilton)

Broomhouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Jennifer Gare (née Hamilton) for leaving this message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Jennifer wrote:

Ainsley Park School

"I went to Ainsley Park School form 1960 to1963.

l walked to school, every day, from my home in Wester Drylaw Drive.   I remember some of the teachers there:

Miss Hay who was a maths teacher

-  Miss Blyth who was the girls gym teacher."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, March 22, 2010

I don't have an email address for Avril, but you should be able to leave a reply
for her under the message that she left in the guestbook on March 22, 2010.

Recollections

34.

James Munro

SW France

Thank you to James Munro for sending me the recollections below.  James tells me that he used to live at Granton Grove (very upmarket!) but has not been back to Edinburgh for about 30 years.

James wrote:

1946-49

Granton Beach

"We used to spend a lot of happy hours on the rocks at Granton Beach, catching crabs of a pretty insignificant size.   There was also a railway embankment running from Newhaven to Granton Harbour with  a large sewage outlet  -  if you sat quietly there appeared enormous rats. 

There was the Wardie Hotel and next to that, a little bakery that, just at the foot of Wardie Steps, a little bakery that sold magnificent rolls at 7pm."

West Harbour Road

"On the road to West Granton Pier, just after the war, there was a surplus war material dump where you could pick up floats, and once a large military revolver with the hammer removed.

You could visit the esparto grass boats and see tarantula spiders in the off-loaded bales.   All very nostalgic but now seems trivial."

James Munro, SW France: August 15+16, 2010

Today

Thanks for the comments, James.  If you returned to the Granton and Leith 'Waterfront' now you'd notice a few changes.

-  Granton beach has probably not changed much since you last saw it.

-  The old railway embankment was taken down a few years ago and has become a footpath (McKelvie Parade).

-  The old sewage pipe has gone and a small sewage pumping station has been built at McKelvie Parade, at the junction of Lower Granton Road and Trinity Road.

-   Wardie Steps are probably as you remember them, but the bakery has gone.

-   Wardie Hotel has been renovated and converted to housing.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  August 16, 2010

Recollections

35.

Frank Ferri

Newhaven, Edinburgh

Thank you to Frank Ferri who added:

The Shoreline

"The shoreline from Granton to Newhaven has certainly changed.  Granton, in the old days, had a large fishing fleet of trawlers.

The pumping station built a few years ago by East of Scotland Water at McKelvie Parade, as the western sewage interceptor, taking sewage to the works at Seafield, has cleaned up the area greatly.  The water at Wardie Bay is now a safer place to paddle.

Up to the 1960s, fishing boats were able to land their catch on the east side of Newhaven fishmarket before the land was reclaimed and used for the offshore oil pipe-coating plant of Bredero Price.  The land is now occupied by housing and an Asda supermarket."

Esparto Grass

"I remember the esparto grass boats at Granton very well, having sailed on one in the early 1950s.  It was the 'Peldale'.  The cargo came from Arzew in Algeria North Africa.

In fact, on one trip we had more than a cargo of grass.  In Arzew, there was a Foreign Legion Fort.  Three Legionnaires, trying to desert,  were found by their officers hiding among our deck cargo of grass.  Poor devils I dread to think what happened to them."

Frank Ferri, Newhaven, Edinburgh:  August 17, 2010

Recollections

36.

Harry Flannigan

New Zealand

Thank you to Harry Flannigan who wrote:

Gypsy Brae

"It takes me back to when we used to  help ourselves to coal down Gipsy Brae to keep the home fires burning.  That was not far from the Granton Gas works near Flemings the dye works at the Royston beach shoreline."

Andrew Boath

"I hope my old mate Andrew Boath is still active with his Bruce Peebles trips, I served my time there."

Harry Flannigan, New Zealand:  February 13, 2011

Harry:

You mentioned Andrew Boath.  He is still living at Granton and is now very active with the Granton History Group.  The group is collecting information on the Granton area and holds a programme of talks on the area.  Andrew is President of the group.  I've passed your message on to him.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 13, 2011

Recollections

37.

James Munro

Le Tonkin, SW France

Thank you to James Munro for writing again.

James wrote:

Embassy Cinema

"I lived in no. 6 Granton Grove. 

Saturday afternoons were strictly reserved for a matinee at the Embassy.  It was 5p in the stalls and 9p on the balcony (from where you could hurl your ice cream carton on to those unfortunates in the stalls).

To get in to the cinema, one would pay, then when the lights dimmed he (or she) would attempt to open the emergency doors to admit their friends.

Films

Sometimes, when a rather upmarket serious film was scheduled, the manager would take the stage and ask all the youngsters to be quiet during the showing  -  a complete waste of time!

The sought-after films were those with Gene Autry, Charles Starrett (The Durango Kid), Hopalong Cassidy, etc.    Boy, were we innocent.

I remember the perfume they used to spray around.

At one of the Edinburgh Festivals, Yehudi Menuhin offered to do a concert at the Embassy 'for the ordinary people'.  The cinema was totally filled with the usual suspects.

James Munro, Le Tonkin, SW France, 2011

Recollections

38.

Iain C Purves

Waterdown, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to C Purves who wrote:

Granton Trawlers

"Alex Dow (10 above) spoke of the trawlers in Granton Harbour.

My uncle 'Big Geordie' Main, was a trawler skipper.  He sailed for:

-  Thomas Liston

Carnie and Gibb

Walter Paton

Devlin's

 to name but a few."

Trawler Radio Band

'Big Geordie' Main

"The photo on one of the pages of Annfield and the tenements of Hawthorne Vale brought back even more memories.

Newhaven Streets  -  Annfield Promenade  - A Valentine Postcard ©

George Main lived in No.8 the Vale, in a top-flat house with a terrific view all the way to Granton Harbour.

Our family had table radios with a 'Trawler Band'.  We used to listen for 'Big Geordie' as he came up the Forth.  I was sent to meet the boat and bring home the 'pauchel', usually a decent sized cod.

The family moved from Hawthorne Vale to No.6 Annfield, where I helped out by scraping the 6 coats of wallpaper off the house walls.

In this photo, a few doors along from No.6 is Gibbie Hare's pub where my Dad, Jackie Purves, worked evenings as a barman."

Iain C Purves, Waterdown, Ontario, Canada:  October 3, 2011

 

Recollections

39.

Dorothy Finlay

Queensland, Australia

Dorothy Finlay wrote in the EdinPhoto guestbook:

Shops at Crewe Road North

"Someone  wrote of the row of shops on the corner of Crewe Road North and Boswall Parkway.  I went to school with Eleanor, one of the girls from Irvin's.  She married the footballer, Billy Stevenson.

They had the drysalter's shop.  I think there were 5 girls.

I lived in Crewe Road West.  I'd love to hear from anyone who remembers me from Ainsley Park School."

Dorothy Finlay, Queensland, Australia:  October 2, 2011

Recollections

40.

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Avril Finlayson Smith replied to Dorothy's message in 39 above:

Shops at Crewe Road North

"Hi Dorothy.  I lived at the top of Crewe Place.  My brother went to Ainslie Park school, but I went to Bellevue after Royston.

I think I might well have been the person that wrote about the shops on the corner of Crewe Road North and Boswall Parkway."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, October 17,, 2010

 

Recollections

41.

Carole Mills (née Manson)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Carole Manson who wrote:

Move to Granton

"We originally moved from Leith to Granton in 1944, and lived right across from Royston school at ee Royston Mains Street.  Then, I went to Flora Stevenson secondary school which, I believe, is only a primary school now..

Methodist Church

"I remember the Methodist Church (as it was then)Me and my sis went to girl guides there.  I also  remember a Mr Welch  the caretaker there.  Our house was just 2 tenements down, on Royston Mains Street.

West Granton Road

"I've been reading all  about the shops in West Granton Road and I remember them all, especially when we had to go for the accumulator for the wireless.  It seemed a fair hike then.

 My grandparents lived across the road from the accumulator shop, which was handy as I would go there to get a drink or something.

I remember a lot of the boys who lived near those shops.  They used to play football in a field there."

Carole Mills (née Manson), Adelaide, South Australia, Australia:  February 14, 2014

 

Granton Primary School

Class Photograph

A school class at Granton School in the 1940s or early 1950s. ©

Around 1950

A school class at Granton School in the 1940s or early 1950s. ©

1962

 

If you have comments that you would like to add, relating to any of the recollections on this site, please email me.

 Thank you.   - Peter Stubbs

 

 

North Edinburgh

Cramond - Granton - Royston - Trinity -  Wardie

Maps

Granton:  transport map 1932

Granton:  small map 1870

Granton:  large map 1870

Recollections

Cramond:                        from 1940s

Cramond Island:              1970s

Granton:                           1930s   1940s   1950s   1970s

Granton, Trinity, Wardie:  1940s   1950s - 60s   Shops

Lower Granton Road        all dates

Muirhouse                         from 1930s

Pilton:                               1940 bomb

Royston:                            from 1930s

Wardie School:                 1930s    1940s   1950s

                                         1960s    1970s   1980s

History

Granton, Trinity, Wardie:  from 1544

 

Recollections  -  More Pages

Recollections  -   Contributors

 

 

__________________

 

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