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EdinPhoto - Home Page  Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.   At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.     At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.  

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photographers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.

 

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere     Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Links to pages with Photos of Groups   Frequently Asked Questions

  Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Links to Dumbiedykes pages  Link to Granton pages  Link to Leith pages   Link to Newhaven pages   Links to Portobello pages   Link to My Recent Talks

 

Recollections

Granton

    Edinburgh Waterfront  -  Looking across Eastern Harbour, Granton, from Middle Pier  -  25 August 2002 ©

1930s to 1950s

1.

George SMITH
Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Pier and Searchlights

Tube-like Vessels

Inchkeith and Granton

2.

Alastair BERRY
Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

William Muir and The Pharos

Middle Pier

Wardie Steps

Granton Breakwater

3.

Graeme Charles MUNRO
Adelaide, South Australia

The Forth

4.

Betty FRASER
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Granton School

5.

Alex DOW
Fife, Scotland

Steamer from London

6.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  'Guid Times at Granton''

6.
Reply

Peter STUBBS
Edinburgh

Poem:  'Guid Times at Granton''

7.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  'Summer Days at Granton'

8.

Archie FOLEY
Joppa, Edinburgh

Poem:  Auld Foley + his daughter

-  'Summer Days at Granton'

-  'Guid Times at Granton''

9.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  ''Winter Time at Granton'

10.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  "When We Were Lads"

11.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  "Fishin' Times at Granton"

12.

Allan DODDS
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Crabs

Partans

13.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Crabs

14.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Granton Characters

-  Jimmy Watson, the Coalman

-  Mr Blaikie, the Fruitman

-  Charlie Smith, the Grocer

15.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  "Guid Grub at Granton"

16.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

More Granton Characters

-  Tosh and his Ponies

-  Davo Fraser and the Kites

-  The Reid Brothers and their Accordions

-  Mrs Ramsay, 'The Toffee Cup Woman'

17.

Marion WILSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Band of Hope

18.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Band of Hope

19.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  "Sundays at Granton"

20.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Shops in West Granton Road - 1940s

21.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Dave and Rab

22.

John STEVENSON
Trinity Edinburgh

The Granton Ferry

-  To Burntisland ...

-  ... and Return to Granton

23.

John FRASER
Edinburgh

Old Bike

-  Found at Granton Tip

-  Accident

Old Boat

-  Found at Granton Tip

-  The Launch

-  Rebuilding

24.

John FRASER
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Amnesty at Granton

Cordite

25.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  "Tram Days at Granton"

26.

Elizabeth WATKINS
Canada

Novel"Time Will Knit"

-  The Cottages

My Family

-  My grandparents

-  My father

-  A pauchel

27.

Peter STUBBS
Edinburgh

Novel:  "Time Will Knit"

28.

John WEST
South Wales

Granton Harbour

To Sea

Granton Ice Company

29.

Jenny CAMERON
(née BRUCE)

My Family

Return Visits to Edinburgh

Visits to Granton

Shops

30.

Hugh GRAY
Australia

Net Works in Lower Granton Road

Coal Man

Granton Shops

Swimmer

31.

Hugh GRAY
Australia

World War II:  Ambulance Crew

32.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  'Trawling'

33.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  'Santa Claus is Coming'

34.

Dave FERGUSON
Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Poem:  'Welcome Tae a Guid New Year'

 

Recollections

1.

George Smith

Vancouver Island, British Columbia

1. 

The Pier and Searchlights

"The recent postcards evoked memories of the harbour -  a Sunday outing with my father, less frequent than I would have liked as his weekends were taken up with Territorial Army duties both at Granton and Leith.

I remember as a small boy being apprehensive about the water swirling beneath the old wooden pier through whose wide  spaced timbers one could see oily looking water. The pier seemed to be populated by old men with fishing rods. Was there a small light tower at the end?

My father's company of Royal Engineers (585 Field Coy, York Place) seemed to have some responsibility for the fixed searchlights at Leith Docks; I do not know if there were any at Granton."

George Smith, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

1.  Answer

"There were no searchlights in Granton."

Walter Hume, Scottish trawlers research, Cowes, Isle of Wight, England

 

2.

Tube-like Vessels

"In the thirties there were two long tube like vessels moored in Granton harbour;  I was told they were old submarines but I was too young to know what that meant.

Does anyone have a similar recollection of what must have been WWl vessels?"

George Smith, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

2.  Answer

"The two tube like vessels moored off the eastern breakwater were known as camels, very similar in appearance to submarines, used to assist in the raising or salvage of ships.

These had been brought from Inverkeithing to keep a damaged Granton trawler afloat after being in collision near Inchkeith.  The camels could be flooded, then emptied by using compressed air, similar to floatation air bags as used today.

The date in question was 1938, as at the same time they were moored in Granton, the old Lighthouse/Buoy tender, s.s. MAY was laid up pending disposal, sold for £1000 and scrapped at Bo'ness.

The new MAY, commissioned March 1938 had recently arrived at her station on the West Pier."

Walter Hume, Scottish trawlers research, Cowes, Isle of Wight, England

 

3.

Inchkeith and Granton

At the commencement of WWll the Engineers were based on Inchkeith which also had artillery.

I have some memory of a warning shot from Inchkeith skipping on the water and ending up on the Granton waterfront.

Is this a false memory or part of Wardie folklore?"

George Smith, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

3.  Answer

The ‘’practise’’ shell did not land on the Granton fore-shore;  it landed on a tenement  near Salamander Street.

Walter Hume, Scottish trawlers research, Cowes, Isle of Wight, England

 

 

Recollections

2.

Alastair Berry

Vancouver Island, British Columbia

 

William Muir and The Pharos

"I was brought up in the 30's in Wardie and seem to remember  being taken to Granton for a  Trip on the paddle  boat 'William Muir'

The Boat tied up in the East basin  almost at the sloping slip and quite close by was a Lighthouse Supply ship 'The Pharos'.  Looking back it seemed to sport a lot of YELLOW  PAINT!

Alastair Berry, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Middle Pier

    Edinburgh Waterfront  -  A walk down Middle Pier, Granton Harbour  -  3 August 2002 ©

The station on the central arm of the  harbour had one of these 'PENNY'  slot machines with footballers,  I think.

I used to spend  hours on that harbour, fascinated by the ICE FACTORY:

watching the massive compressor fly wheel and con rod  rotating about 60 rpm.

-  seeing the  pipes covered in frost - and deeply inhaling the ammonia fumes that permeated the area:

watching the men with hooks sliding blocks of ice into Joe Croan's(?)

-  watching the fish being unloaded from the trawlers......wonderful for an 8 yrs old  kid!!

In the middle of 1939, we moved to Liberton.

Alastair Berry, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Wardie Steps

    Looking down on Wardie Square and Granton Harbour from Granton Road  -  October 2002 ©

As a  youngster I used  the Wardie Steps  to get  down to the  breakwater and  Granton beach where I used  to play quite a lot.

A memory of Wardie Steps is that one house wife used  to 'holy stone' her front door threshold lavender colour  rather  than the more  common white.  

Alastair Berry, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Granton Breakwater

    Granton Breakwater  -  8 September 2002 ©

A  curious  memory,  one  year,  1937 -38 I guess, cuttlefish appeared and scooted  about in the  surf.

They were about  2' long- several were  caught and  dragged  on shore  for  us  kids  to admire!!   

The only other fish I remember  being caught were  mackerel that were  taken on the wooden light house section at  the  distant  end  of  the  breakwater.

Alastair Berry, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

 

 

Recollections

3.

Graeme Charles Munro

Adelaide, South Australia.

Thank you to Graeme Charles Munro, Adelaide, South Australia,  for sending the following comments:

The Forth

I remember how I bathed in the 'red' sea at Granton foreshore, as it was full of ink wastage from Fleming's Ink works there.

My wife was in the office there for years in Caroline Park House.

I remember all the stuff that got washed ashore from ships that were torpedoed in the Forth

Graeme Charles Munro, Adelaide, South Australia.  4 September 2005.

 

Recollections

4.

Betty Fraser

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Thank you to Betty Fraser, née Simpson, for adding a comments to the EdinPhoto guest book.

Betty wrote:

Granton School

"I have been looking for information on Granton School. I lived in Royston Mains Road 1936 to 41. I went to Granton School.

I remember 'helping' the first aid post (at the school) to allow them to practise their bandaging and being given a cup of tea and a pie!

Simple pleasures ... Hiding in the air raid shelters, bonfires (before the war)."

Betty Fraser:  Sydney, Australia:  February 10, 2006

 

Recollections

5.

Alex Dow

Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Alex Dow, for the following recollections of Granton, and for his recollections of Granton in the 1940s and 1950s.

Alex wrote: 

Steamer from London

"My first memory of Granton Harbour is of being aboard a coastal steamer in 1939, on which my uncle Robert Tant was a passenger, sailing back to London and his work as one of the Hawker Aircraft  Company's Design Staff.

I have copies of some of his drawings of the modifications to the main wing spar of the Hurricane, to take two 20 mm cannon in place of two .303 Brownings.

After his death in 1944, I inherited his drawing instruments; and used them during my apprenticeship with Ferranti Ltd."

Alex Dow:  September 10, 2006

 

Recollections

6.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to Dave Ferguson who wrote:

Neighbours

"I was brought up in Granton in the late-1930s and early-1940s.  Ii stayed there until I joined the army in 1956.

I remember Jean Foley an' Fay MacDonald.  They lived in Granton Medway and were our next door neighbours.  They made fishing nets on piece work in the backgreen to earn extra cash.

Shops

"Louis Demarco was a very kind man.  If you only had one old penny he would always give you a small bag of chips.  Bert, his son was a champion snooker player.

At Granton square the shops on the front were, the cobbler, barber, newsagent and a Café for the work men

Poem

"Here are a few verses about Granton, as remembered from the time that I lived there.  I  hope your viewers can follow the dialect.

Guid Times at Granton

Granton, Granton how proud ye were, when horse an’ cairt aince graced yer square.

Yince a place fu o’ thrills when grass boats fed the paper mills.

Wagons loaded engines steamin' - lorries tae on journeys screamin’,

headin’ fer the mills afar, Granton, Granton, yer quite a star.

Doon the Eli Brae we’d run tae the harbour fer some fun.

Mony things fer boys tae dae, filled thier hearts in every way.

Boat building, My! whit a trade gied local folk a livin' wage.

Watching the blacksmith at his fire, little boys did this inspire.

Some things stuck in oor heads, Jean Foley an’ Fay makin’ nets,

set thier strands ‘tween claes poles fine an’ sometimes sang an’ worked till nine.

My, Oh my whit a place, lots o’ bairns Granton raised.

Plenty o’ fun wis the game.  Oot a' day, nae gaun hame.

Doon tae the beach, aff we’d gae, intae the hot roll shop on the way.

The rolls wid see us thro’, till the sea from the shore withdrew.

Buckies an’ mussels frae the rocks we’d gather in auld milk tins fu’ o’ sea water,

Biled them on a fire sae braw, fueled wi’ wid an coal an aw.

Wee laddies playin’ an’ lassies skippin’ - a’ oor games sae braw an’ grippin’.

My!  Whit times they really were, Granton's bairns playin’ at the Square.

On workin’ morns, Granton wis busy. Folk catchin’ trams fair in a tizzie.

Steam engines blawin’, works whistles tae, folk frae the noises knew the time o’ day.

At Louis Demarcos, on a Sunday morn, queuin’ fer fags wis quite the norm.

Staun in the queue tae keep a place wis whit we done tae get some grace.

Doon by the harbour there wis some shoppies, the cobbler, the barber an’ a paper shoppie.

Oh, michty me, how times flew on since I was a lad in old Granton.

DF.377 **

**  Dave tells me that he ends all his poems with DF 377.  (This was part of his army number.)

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 8, 2012

 

Reply to Recollections

6.

Peter Stubbs

Edinburgh

Hi  Dave.  This is just a brief note to let you know that your contribution in 'Recollection 6' above is appreciated.

-   I enjoyed reading your poem and adding it to the web site.

-   About half an hour after I added it to the site, I received this message from Allan Dodds, now living in Nottingham, who wrote:

Granton Poem

"This is superb!    More of this sort of thing is needed"

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

More Poems

I look forward adding more of your contributions to the site, Dave.

Meanwhile, if anybody would like to read a few more poems, you'll find some written by members of Edinburgh Photographic Society on this page:

EPS Poems

Recollections

7.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending another poem about growing up in Granton.

Here it is:

 

Summer Days in Granton

Being a bairn at Granton had lots o' fun an' joy

fer me an' wee Rab a pair o' growin' boys.

A pair o' skates at times we had, we jist got one each.

We were the lads.

We balanced on a single skate went fleein' doon the street.

We started at the Keepie so we could get some speed.

The journey was a good ane as we went fleein'

by Past Louis Demarco's chippie an' the Anchor Inn.

Och aye, the Wire Works we passed as weel, auld Charlie Smiths tae

Then, fleein' on another bit we passed the Eli Brae

Granton Square came loomin' up an sittin' roond the bend

Auld Foley wi' his horse an cairt, that's where oor journey ends.

Now that wis fun I'll tell ye this,

fer laddies growin' up, playin' up an doon the street

ootside the Anchor pub, singin' an' shoutin' or playin' a game o' tig, balancin' on the Anchor rail thinkin' ye were big.

Mony things we had tae dae that kept us on the spree

like buildin' guiders, wi' driftwood frae the sea.

We pulled oot a' the nails, straightened them by hand

an' yaised them ower again, we were a happy band.

We made holes in the timbers tae mak a swivel joint.

We yaised a red hot poker wi a sharp tip at the point.

Makin' guiders wis oor game, masters we truly were

cause we could run them roond aboot tae tak us anywhere.

Guiders strong, an barries tae.

We pulled them up the Eli Brae

fu' o' coke tae stoke the fire,

 a' brocht hame frae the cinder mire.

Hard work done, jist fun tae laddies

chopped sticks tae sell thripence a baggie.

Selt o' them tae oor neighbours fine

tae get some money fer picture time.

Off tae the Emby we did go

tae see Roy Rodgers in a picture show.

My,Oh My it wis great fun

growin up in old Granton.

Stories, stories I could write sae many

o' things we done tae get a penny.

Times like these were fun an' joy.

Jist whit wis needed fer twae growin boys

DF.377

 

Dave explained:

Eli Brae

A shortcut from West Granton Road to Shore Road

Emby

This was our name for the Embassy Cinema in Boswall Parkway.

Auld Foley

He lived Granton Medway and  was a cairter for the Duke o' Buccleuch.

daughter Jean

She made fish nets in the backgreen.

single skate

It was common for children in large families to have one skate each.

The Keepie

The keep left sign at junction of West Granton Road. Pilton Drive North and Granton Crescent.

Cinder Mire

The old stone quarry behind Granton gas works.  It was used as a tip for waste from the gas plant.

We used to glean the coke from the tip.

 

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 12, 2012

 

Reply to Recollections

8.

Archie Foley

Joppa, Edinburgh

I mentioned to Archie Foley that one of his relations, Jean Foley was featured in Dave Ferguson's poem, 'Guid Times at Granton'.

Archie then read Dave's poem 'Summer Days at Granton' and wrote:

Auld Foley and his Daughter

"I see  that Dave Ferguson is continuing to immortalise my family in verse "Auld Foley wi' his horse an cairt" is definitely my great-uncle Frank.

When I got my memory working, I remembered he had a daughter named Jean, mentioned in the first poem, 'Guid Times at Granton.''

Uncle Frank was commonly referred to as Old Fritz in the family, and his son Francis as Young Fritz.  

I think Uncle Frank worked for Edward Ferry the Contractor.  His older brother, Peter, though, definitely worked around the Middle Pier for the Duke of Buccleuch until into his seventies."

Archie Foley, Joppa, Edinburgh:  February 15, 2012

Recollections

9.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending a third poem about growing up in Granton.

Here it is:

 

Winter Time at Granton

Winter time at Granton wis really fu' o' fun,

sledgin' an slidin' in the winter sun.

Wearin' oot yer shoes by slidin' doon the street

an' sometimes five star bits, but it was sure a treat.

Alang the crescent we did go tae hae some sledgin' fun,

frae the nineteen bus terminus the sledgin' route did run.

Jist like a glacier glistenin' bright,

the ice covered slope every bairns delight.

Fleeing on yer sledge tae the bottom o' the hill

wis a' that wis needed tae gi'e the bairns a thrill.

Ten at night we're a' called hame,

oot came the mithers  tae the hill again.

Pails o' water they splashed it doon

It froze on the hill, Granton's winter croon.

Oot came the bairns the followin' day,

smillin' an' laughin that wis the way.

DF.377

 

Dave explained:

Five star bits

A free issue of boots from the Police.

They had five holes in the tongue.  This stood for 'Do not pawn these boots', a message known to all pawn brokers.

 

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 15, 2012

Recollections

10.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending another poem about growing up in Granton.

Dave wrote

Billy and John

I wrote this poem to two of my pals, Billy Paton and John Mitchell, some twenty five years ago when Billy was going on a visit to John who lives in New Zealand.

We made a video of me reciting it and changing from casual dress to full highland dress, gradually through the recital.

It was timed to start at seven minutes to midnight on old years night with the recital finishing and the new year being welcomed in with the pipes and drums.

I have never seen the completed video. Come on one of you send me a copy.

When We Were Lads

Oh pals o’ mine I write these lines,
o’ times gone bye when we were nine.
Grand
days were they, as lads we played
 in Granton harbour or Wardie bay.

Tae see the boats unload their cargo,
Esparto grass frae Spanish portos
Fish landin’s tae, a sicht tae see,
a smillin’ crew a’ filled wi’ glee

Alang the harbour would surely stroll.
the 'Tap' or 'Anchor', next port o’ call.
Sometimes wi’ luck some fish we’d get
frae aff the grund or cobbled set.

Aye, hame tae the hoose in haste ye’d skip
an hae yer ma mak fish an chips.
They'd,they’d a’ tuck in an’ fair enjoy a meal
brocht hame frae a wee wee boy.

GRAND TIMES WERE THEY WHEN WE WERE LADS.

The fun we had in times gone by
micht  bring a glint or tear tae eye.
Grand times were they, when we were lads.

Doon tae the cinder quarry we’d aften gae
tae gether coke an’ sometimes play.

Auld granny Smith remember her?
A
vantis gie ye if she had any
an tak frae ye jist one auld penny.

GRAND TIMES WERE THEY WHEN WE WERE LADS.

Tell yer kids that they micht ken
the fun ye had when nearly ten
Remember the girds an' guiders we had?
Auld
tyres, bike wheels, we were the lads
.

We'd roll them up an doon the road
an’ laugh an play an jump like toads.
Aye, doon the street ye’d scoot wi’ pride
upon yer guider a handsome ride.

Ye’d fill yer heart wi  a’ its glories
tae gi’e some grit tae oor wee stories.

GRAND TIMES WERE THEY WHEN WE WERE LADS.

The whips an peeries ye’ll no’ forget.
We
played wi’ them on the 'Anchor' steps
The coloured tops a’ aglow
when spinnin' roond  a grand, grand show.

The lassies, tae, wi’ sticks an’ string
up in the air diabolos fling.
‘Twas a grand sicht tae see,
wee  bairns, contented, happy.

GRAND TIMES WERE THEY WHEN WE WERE LADS.

Now here we are as grown men,
oor hearts fair fu’ o’ stories braw,
wis it really a’ that lang ago
since we were lads at Granton ‘o’.

When we were young, fine weel ye ken,
They
were the times that made us men.

GRAND TIMES WERE THEY WHEN WE WERE LADS.

DF.377

 

Dave explained:

Esparto grass

I understood that it came from Spain.
I now know that it comes from Africa.

The Tap and

'The Anchor Inn''

These were two well known pubs frequented by trawlermen at the end of a trip.

Anchor Inn, 114-116 West Granton Road  -  February 2012 ©

Cinder Quarry

The old stone quarry the gas works used as a tip for waste from the retorts.

Granny Smith

She lived at 21 West Granton Road, most  older people will remember her from  her  hut shop next to  Sheriff's  chemical store on the shore road at Royston beach.

©

Vantis

I’ll bet this brings back a  few  memories.  It was a fizzy drink, which consisted of a fruit tablet put in some water and charged with oxygen to aerate  it.

It was really great if you had a penny.  There were not many to spare then, but we were happy.

Gird

 A hoop to roll up the street.

Guider

A boys' steerable cart

Whip and peerie

A spinning top,  which  you kept spinning by whipping it.  We coloured the top with crayons to enjoy the mix spinning.

Diabolo

A girls toy.  I’ll tell ye, some of these girls could really work them -  two sticks, a piece of string and the Diablo, and off they went.

 

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 14, 2012

Recollections

11.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending yet another poem about growing up in Granton.

Here it is:

 

Fishin' Times at Granton

The Partan Run

We harvested partans when evenin’ tides were low,

an' mony a guid bag we truly had to show.

An iron cleek wis yaised tae reach the partans den.

We wriggled it roond aboot an’ up an’ doon again.

This agitates the monster lyin’ in the lair.

We kept on goin’ tae anger him  some mair.

He wid grab the cleek wi’ claws that could surely break a finger.

We pu’ed him frae his lair ‘cause we didnae want tae linger

In the bag he wid gae till we had enough

fer feedin’ a family big wis really quite tough.

The partan run wis aften guid tae a’ us hardy lads

an’ yince mair on the table food fer mum an’ dad.

The seaside wis sich a joy fer Granton's girls an’ boys,

’cause sometimes we’d see a school o’ porpoise.

The sea was fu’ o’ life fer a’ the bairns tae see.

Up wid pop a seal, always on the spree.

Lovely lobsters tae we were really lucky tae catch,

’cause they were very wary an hid well in their patch.

Buckies tae another food we’d harvest frae the sea

alang wi’ bags o’ mussels, Granton bairns were we. 

We ate a’ the mussels enjoyed a’ the fun,

’cause we were Granton's bairns on the partan run.

Sledgin doon the hill for fer fun.

Happy bairns in the winter sun.

DF.377

 

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 18, 2012

 

Recollections

12.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to  Allan Dodds who read Dave Ferguson's poem about fishing for partans (crabs) at Granton and replied:

Crabs

"I loved Dave Ferguson's poem about fishing for crabs at Granton.  I did that myself, but Mother regarded locally sourced shellfish as deleterious to one's health, so my hard won offerings went straight into the bin on my return from a Granton fishing expedition!"

Allan added:

Partans

"I would not have expected Edinburgh folk to know the meaning of 'partan'.   It' is a Gaelic word.   My wife's family comes from Orkney'partans' was, and probably still is, the word used there for crabs."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  February 19, 2012

Recollections

13.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Dave Ferguson replied:

Crabs

"We had no trouble eating the crabs when I came out of the army in 1959.  I used to catch them at Granton, and I ate them until the mid-1960s.

By that time, I lived in Jamaica Street.  We had a German lady named Freida who lived in the same stair.  I caught the crabs she dressed them.  They were absolutely delicious."

Dave added:

Partans

"Yes, we always used the word ''partan' as boys.  I don't know the origin of the word but I certainly used it from a very young age.

We could distinguish between a common crab and a partan by the shell.  The partan had a light brown smooth shell.  You will see it in any fishmonger's shop today."

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 19, 2012

Recollections

14.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson who wrote:

Granton Characters

 1.

Jimmy Watson

The Coalman

"Jimmy lived in the big house on the corner of West Granton Road and Pilton Drive North. He used to cut logs in the front yard with quite a contraption for a saw bench.

He used to jack up the rear of his small truck onto axle stands, remove one wheel and fit a hub to drive the belt of the saw.

He was always bawling and shouting, especially if the saw jammed.  He was a loud man who enjoyed a few beers.  He was well liked in Granton As bairns, we thought it was great to watch and listen to him."

 2.

Mr Blaikie

The Fruitman

"Mr Blaikie lived in Granton Crescent, as I recall.

He used to bring his fruit barrow to the side of the Anchor Inn on a Saturday evening.  One of us would pinch a bit fruit from his barrow, knowing he could be seen, then Blaikie would start throwing chipped fruit at us.

It was a great way to get a freebie, we thought we were smart but he new what we were up to, and was glad to get rid of the chipped fruit and have a bit fun with us. They don't come like that any more."

 3.

Charlie Smith

The Grocer

"Charlie owned the grocer shop in West Granton Road before Mr Ramage had it,  He was quite a guy.  He always had a story to tell and kept his customers happy.

One morning, I overheard him tell his customers: 'See her fae the Medway - what's her name? - she stood there gossiping fer sae long yesterday that a dug thought she was a post''.  I just burst out laughing and had to run very fast.

He was a good man and always helpful.  He sold everything you could think of from groceries to cycle spares, briquettes and firewood.  He charged accumulator batteries for the wireless.

Charlie was always cheery.  We could do with some of his kind nowadays."

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  February 29, 2012

Recollections

15.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending yet another poem about growing up in Granton.

Here it is:

 

Guid Grub at Granton

Granton grub wis really great, plenty fish an' tatties,

Its what we ate in Granton when we were growin' laddies.
Stovies tae, a tasty dish, jist burnt a bit fer flavour,
Wis whit we liked as Granton lads, sich tasty bits tae savour.

Hot scones an' jam richt aff the girdle, we scoffed them aff wi' joy,
Cause we were always hungry as growin' Granton boys.
Ma mither was a guid cook, when it came tae mince an' tatties,
A handfu' o' macaroni in the mince, guid grub fer growin' laddies.

We loved these tasty dinners an' ne'r did complain,
Fer grub like that wis great, wholesome an plain

DF.377

 

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  March 3, 2012

Recollections

16.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson for following up his 'Recollections 14' above by telling me about more Granton characters.

Dave wrote:

More Granton Characters

 4.

Tosh

and his ponies

"I think 'Tosh' was short for McIntosh. I never knew him by any other name.  He lived in Wardieburn Road.

How many folk remember Tosh with his fine poniesWhen he wasn't busy doing business, he would come to Charlie Smith's field in West Granton Road with his ponies.

We could ride round the field thripence a ride. (Roy Rodgers, Hopalong Cassidy an Gene Autry, had nothing on us.)

Tosh  was a smiling, curly headed man who had plenty of time for us bairns.  His ponies were kept at Texas on the shore road at Granton.  There were a few stables there.  I'm not sure who they belonged to.

Baxter, the fruit and veg man, kept his pony there too.  He did a daily round with his cart in the Granton-Wardieburn area.

Around the stable area there was an abundance of rabbits and foxes."

 5.

Davo Fraser

and the kites

"Davo and his family lived in Granton Medway.  They were a family full of fun.  Does anyone remember the family, Davie, Dolly, and Totsie.  There may have been a younger child.  I'm not too sure

During the street party for the Coronation, Davo was King. There was much singing and dancing, and feasting as well.  Well, there were plenty sandwiches and cream cookies.  To us, it was a feast,  Davo's radiogram was in the garden playing at full blast.

I'll tell you, we might have been poor but we knew how to enjoy ourselves and help each other, and we had the greatest respect for all the parents around us.  They were there for us.

When we were bairns, we made our own kites.  We used bamboo to make the cross, covered it with brown paper and stuck it down with gummed paper.

Some of us from the larger families couldn't afford the materials so Davo and Mr Walker, his neighbour, made a huge kite taller than a man with a divot on the tail.  They flew it in the big field, as we knew it, right behind the Anchor Inn, it took three grown men to control it.

What a grand sight for Granton's bairns.  All of us who hadn't a kite knew we belonged because of Davo Fraser and Mr Walker. Where has all the fun gone for children these days?"

 6.

The Reid Brothers

and their Accordions

"The Reid Brothers lived at 23 West Granton Road.  They were both blind, but were very accomplished accordion players, well known in the Granton area.  We could often hear them practicing as we passed by thier house."

 7.

Mrs Ramsay

The Toffee Cup Woman

"I always remember Mrs Ramsay as 'The Toffee Cup Woman'. She lived in Granton Medway and sold toffee cups at the kitchen window for a penny or tuppence each depending on size.

If she saw you had no money, she would call you over and ask if you wanted a toffee covered spoon - but don't tell the rest.

You were never left out at Granton.  Times were hard for all but great times they surely were."

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  March 3, 2012

Recollections

17.

Marion Wilson (née Murray)

Currie, Edinburgh

Thank you to  Marion Wilson for posting a message in the EdinPhoto Guestbook.

Marion wrote:

Band of Hope

"I was brought up in West Granton Road and often went to the Band of Hope, a small building at the beginning of Granton Square.  Does anyone remember it?

We were shown slides, and of course sung Gospel songs."

Marion Wilson (née Murray), Currie, Edinburgh:
Message posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook, March 4, 2012

Recollections

18.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Dave Ferguson replied:

Band of Hope

"Hello Marion,  I see that you are one of the old brigade!

I remember the Band of Hope at the foot of West Granton Road.  We called it 'The Magic Lantern'

On a Sunday evening and on one of the evenings during the week, the stories were good - and of course there were slides to accompany them.

Square Centre Youth Club

We had great times in Granton! I was a member of the Square Centre Youth Club.  Do you remember it The Saturday Night Dances were great fun."

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  March 4, 2012

Recollections

19.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to David Ferguson for sending another of his poems about Granton to me.

Here it is:

 

Sundays at Granton

Sundays at Granton wis fun fer a' the lads,
Oot playing fitba' alang wi thier dads.
Twenty a side wis quite a common sight,
We played there a' day an' ne'r once a fight.

Aff came the shirts as the sweat came pouring oot,
As the dads an the lads on the pitch ran aboot.
It really wis a hoot, the scores were such a joy,
15 fer the faithers an 20 fer the boys.

Happy times they really were fer men an' growin' laddies, Fitba' in the big field* then hame tae mince an' tatties

DF.377

 

*   Dave Ferguson added:

Two Fields

"At Granton, in my time, there were two fields, the big field and the wee field:

-  The wee field was Charlie Smith's field

-  The big field was right behind the Anchor Inn.

Aerial View of United Wire Works + Legend

©  Reproduced with acknowledgement to Simmons Aerofilms Ltd (who took this photograph),
  United Wire Works (who used it on a postcard) and Malcolm Cant (who provided a copy of the postcard)

In this aerial photos which looks to the NW  across United Wire Works, the two fields can clearly be seen.

The big field has a worn patch where the fitba' action took place.

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  March 4, 2012

Aerial View

2001

In the aerial vie below, we zoom out to see West Granton Road that passed immediately to the south of Anchor Inn, but is just cut off the bottom of the photo above.  This view looks to the north.

By the time that this 2001 aerial view was taken, United Wire Works had expanded to the south, absorbing the big field and the wee field that used to lie between the wire works and the Anchor Inn.

Aerial View of Granton and Edinburgh Waterfront, 2001+ Legend

 ©  Copyright: XYZ Digital Map Company Limited Click here for details of web site.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  March 4+5, 2012

 

Recollections

20.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to David Ferguson for writing again, this time with a list of the shops at West Granton Road around the 1940s.

Dave wrote:

West Granton Road Shops

Around 1940s

Starting at Broompark Avenue and travelling west, these were the shops:

Charlie Smith,  general store

Anchor Inn,  off licence

Sherring's,  butcher

Demarco's,  fish & chip shop

Demarco's,  ice cream shop and café with snooker room at the rear

Cook's,  newsagent

Noble Gresty,  grocer

Leith Provident,  bakery

Leith Provident,  butcher

Watson's,  clothing and wools

Leith Provident,  grocery

Dumfriesshire Dairy Company,  dairy goods

-  Halside, fishmonger.  His brother also served apprenticeship in the shop.

-  drysalter

Hay's Cash Storegrocery and vegetables

 Crossing over the road and travelling back, the shops were

Albert's,  fish & chip shop

Jimmy Smith,  barber

Chemist shop

-  Bee Hive,  clothing and footwear,  grocery

Mathieson,  baker.  Their bakehouse was in Main Street, Newhaven.
Their goods were of most excellent quality with a very distinctive taste.

Ellen's Library,  lending library and sweet shop

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  April 29, 2012 + May 6, 2012

 

Recollections

21.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to David Ferguson for sending me this photo taken on the back green at his home, 39 West Granton Road.

Dave wrote:

Dave and Rab

39 West Granton Road

    Dave Ferguson and his younger brother, Rab, in the back green of their home at 39 West Granton Road, around 1940 ©

"Here is a photo of myself and my younger brother, Rab, in the backgreen of 39 West Granton Road, taken around 1940.

I see my favourite horse is with me.

My mum used to tie me to the clothes pole 'cause I was a wanderer.  My brother, Rab, still talks fondly of the two Granton scallywags, and we are still the same today."

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:   May 2, 2012

Recollections

22.

John Stevenson

Trinity, Edinburgh

I remember the restrictions that applied to buying drinks in Public Houses on a Sunday in Scotland for the first few years after I arrived in Edinburgh at the age of 18 in 1963.

John Stevenson also remembers that era.

John tells me:

The Granton Ferry

To Burntisland ...

"The 4pm Sailing of the 'Wullie Muir' and, in later years, the 'Thane of Fife' from Granton to Burntisland was always busy on a Sunday.  Passengers used to travel the five miles across the Firth of Forth on the ferry then drink in the Pubs at Burntisland in the evening.

The Law in Scotland then allowed drinking on a Sunday evening from 5pm to 10pm, but only for 'bona fide travellers'."

... and Return to Granton

"The drinkers returned on the last ferry back across the Forth, arriving in Granton at about 11pm.  They were met there by 6 policemen - twice the number that were normally based at Granton in the Police Houses at the foot of Granton Road, close to the harbour.

The Police tried to prevent any unruly behaviour by the drinkers, though I remember my Mum and Dad telling me that on some Sundays the drinkers managed to break a few windows in Granton on their return from Burntisland.

John D Stevenson Trinity Edinburgh:  February 5, 2012

 

Recollections

23.

John Fraser

Edinburgh

Thank you to John Fraser for posting  message in the EdinPhoto guestbook about items found on the tip at Granton Harbour.

John wrote:

Old Bike

Found at Granton Tip

"I lived in Granton in 1942-1953, at 5 Wardieburn Place East.

I still remember the old bike that we found on the tip at Granton Harbour.   It had no tyres, no chain, no seat and no brakes.

-  I sat on the crossbar

-  Ian Little was behind me with his feet on the pedals.

Alec Sutherland stood on the forks at the back, hands on Ian's shoulders.

John Wood sat on the handlebars.

Off we went down Wardieburn Street North, picking up speed with Tom Hume pushing at the back."

Accident

"We approached the pavement in Granton Crescent at the top of the hill. I couldn't reach the ground with my feet and I couldn't turn the handlebars, so we hit the pavement and came to a dead stop.

John Wood came off the handlebars and landed on the front wheel  (very sore!)

Ian's feet came off the pedals and he landed on the seat pillar (extremely sore!)

Alec landed on the back wheel, repeating John Wood's scream of pain

I went over the handlebars and landed on top of John, then on to the pavement (with one large egg on my head).

We returned the bike to the dump."

Old Boat

Found at Granton Tip

"The other adventure we had was with our 'boat'.

Louis Wood, John Inglis, Andrew (Tickle) Little and my brother Davie found the shade from above a billiard table at the tip.

They brought it home and had it in the backgreen of No.5.  They had all the children in the street gather tar bubbles from the roads and pavements.

Using an old tarpaulin, they melted the tar in an old five gallon drum. A man came from the council and said that our mothers would be evicted because of the smell from the tar, so after a few beltings the building of the boat was shifted elsewhere."

The Launch

"On the day of launching, the boat was put on two guiders and pulled to Granton beach. John Inglis said that as he was the oldest he should get first shot. The boat was pushed into the water and John paddled out. The water was shallow and he only got twenty feet out when he let out a yell"The boat's sinking"

Rebuilding

"So, it was back home and more tar.  

The second time was better.  The boat didn't sink.  It was Louis' turn, but he forgot to bring the paddle with him.  By the time we got it to the launch site, the boat had floated too far out to reach. We stood and watched it until it disappeared from sight.

Regards to all:

Nettie Jean Inglis

Jeanette Scammel

    and others."

John Fraser, Edinburgh:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook:  February 12, 2013

 

Recollections

24.

John Fraser

Inch, Edinburgh

Thank you to John Fraser for following up his comments in Recollections 23 above with more memories.

John wrote:

Amnesty at Granton

"I remember the time when the railway wagons were at Granton shore filled with guns etc.  They were headed for Brechins, the shipbreakers' yard.  I had a few rifles without firing pins, sten guns and a bayonet.

An amnesty was called, asking people to give up their weapons.  On the Tuesday morning (when the buckets went out) the streets of Granton were like an armed camp with all the rifles etc. in piles against the buckets.

Cordite

Later ,six wagons came off the track and the doors burst open. They were filled with rolls of cordite.  Me and my pals laid a string of cordite along the gutter.  Betty Henderson from No 7 was behind the hedges with her boyfriend.  We put a small pile at the hedges, retreated to No.5 and lit the fuse.

Bright light, bang and screams.  We ran!"

John Fraser, Inch, Edinburgh.  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook on  20 March 2013, following up a message that he posted in the guestbook on 12 February 2013.

Recollections

25.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending me another of his poems, this one written recently.

Dave wrote:

Poem

"My brother asked me to write a wee poem about trams.  This is is the result.  I thought you might like it for your recollections of Granton:

'Tram Days at Granton'

Trams at Granton Square  -  zoom-in

©  Reproduced by courtesy Lothian Buses plc

Reminiscences of an old Grantonian

How many folk frae Granton, remember the number two

Fae Granton tae Stenhouse, a guid run fer me and you

Or maybe a number nine, frae the square tae Spylaw park

We played there aw day, travelled back when it was dark

 

The trams were a treat, trundlin’ doon the hill

An’ wee laddies at the bottom, waitin’ fer a thrill

They jumped upon the empty car, tae change the seats direction

Fer a hurl tae the crossover, that wis the real intention

 

We helped the conductor, and did the seats upstairs

And scoured aboot fer prizes, lyin’ on the flair

Sometimes jist a penny, or maybe a tanner tae

We loved the trams at Granton, they were happy days

 

Now that wis guid fun , when things were really scarce

Tae see the number nine frae Colinton, arrive at Granton Square

It wis aw well conducted, by the man whae wis a star

Fae the folk whae came tae Granton, on an an auld tramcar

 

The trams are comin’ back, and that’ll be real soon

Frae the airport thro’ Corstorphine,  an’ on tae Edin’ toon

The fare micht be pricey! But a pleasant trip I’m sure

Fer the folk that want tae yaise it, a real congestant cure

 

I hope the bairns like them, and hae the fun I had

When helping the conductor as a wee Granton lad

They’ll no’ be able, tae dae the things we done

But I’m sure they’ll enjoy, a real tramcar run.

DF377

 

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  January 28, 2014

 

Recollections

26.

Elizabeth Watkins

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Thank you to Elizabeth Watkins for writing from Canada.

Elizabeth wrote:

'Time Will Knit''

'The Cottages'

"My father  told me of a book titled 'Time Will Knit' which contained details of 'The Cottages' along the waterfront from Granton. 

My father  was born in 'The Cottages' and told me about the book, but I've never been able to trace it.  Do you know of this book?   I've never been able to trace it. ***

*** Please also see Recollections 27 below

My Family

My Grandparents

"My father's parents lived in 'The Cottages', and many a tale was told of their life there in those early years - especially the mischief of sailing paper boats that were set on fire and travelled the water system that took away the waste from the joined common toilets."

My Father

"My father was a railway shunter at the outset of his working days.  I have pics of him and others standing by the 'goods trains' along the waterfront.

He was a frustrated sailor.  He knew all the trawler men, and every hour possible between shifts would be down the pier helping with the catch.

A Pauchel

He was never paid cash, but for his work he was given a pauchel,  a bag of assorted fish from lemon sole to plaice to haddock and down the hierarchy chain.

The bag (pre-plastic) was made of sailcloth and my job was first to identify the fish and then to take them to be smoked in Newhaven and to make sure I got the right finnan haddies back.

Elizabeth Watkins, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada:  May 20, 2014

 

Recollections

27.

Peter Stubbs

Edinburgh

'Time Will Knit'

A Novel

"Elizabeth Watkins, in her Recollections 26 above, mentions   'Time Will Knit' .  This was a novel written by Fred Urquhart who was born in the USA and moved to Edinburgh.  It was his first book.  He wrote it in

Copies For sale

"I have good news for Elizabeth about the book.  I see that the AbeBooks web site has several copies of for sale.  The copies available today range in price:

-  from 60p for paperback copy,  published in 1988

-  to £125 for a first edition, a hardback published in 1938.

Extract from the Book

"I visited the National Library of Scotland, here in Edinburgh, yesterday and enjoyed browsing through a copy of the book.  So, thank you, Elizabeth, for telling me about it.

Here is an extract from the book:"

'Time Will Knit'

Extract:

"I knew from Mom's description of it that this wide open space was Harrisfield Square.  On one side there was a bank, and a smithy, and a public house called the Harrisfield Tavern, though everybody called it the Tap for short.

And on the other side there was a police station and a pretty little church with a church hall beside it.

There was a road leading into each corner of the square, The Harrisfield Road, the West Road, opposite it, the Low Road and the Forthport Road.  The harbour was at the foot of the square.

Mom said it was a busy harbour, but all the boats I could see were two dingy old tramps, and two or three little trawlers, lying like old tin tubs.

Away to the west, lying somewhere between the West Road and the Low Road, was a huge gasometer, and beyond that, in the distance, I could see the Forth Bridge."

Extract from Time Will Knit (Fred Urquhart):   p.10

The Novel

"The author describes Harrisfield Square as 'a small decaying fishing port on the Firth of Forth'.  For anybody who is still in doubt as to where he is speaking about:

-  Harrison Square = Granton Square

-  Harrisfield Road = Granton Road

-  the West Road = West Granton Road

-  the Low Road = West Harbour Road

-  Forthport Road = Lower Granton Road

Later in the novel, talking about the local sawmill, the author says it: 'belonged, like everything else in Harrisfield,  to Sir Malcolm Harris'.

Sir Malcolm Harris = The Duke of Buccleuch

The first edition of the book has a small sketch, on its cover, a view of part of Granton Harbour with the coast of Fife clearly visible in the background.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  June 4, 2014

 

Recollections

28.

John West

South Wales

Thank you to John West who wrote:

Granton Harbour

"I lived at Granton Square where my mum and dad were caretakers for the Granton Harbour Offices.  My twin brother, Alan, and I  used the harbour and surrounding areas as our playground.

To Sea

"What adventures we used to get up to!  We were both in the Sea Cadets at HMS Claverhouse, across the road. , I joined the RNR Before I signed up for the Royal Navy."

Granton Ice Company

"When I left the Navy, my first job was at the GrantonIce Company where my brother also worked.

I now live in South Wales, but I've looked on Google at Granton now.  What a change has taken place there!"

Elizabeth Watkins, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada:  May 20, 2014

 

Recollections

29.

Jenny Cameron (née Bruce)

Thank you to Jenny Cameron who wrote:

My Family

"My grandfather lived at Broompark Avenue before moving to Granton, some time before the start of World War II.  He became a clerk for the Duke of Buccleuch at Granton Harbour.

My father James (Jimmy) Bruce (1900-2004) attended Heriot's School before going on to 'Night School' to train as a Civil Engineer.  During the day, he surveyed the piers at Granton Harbour as part of his training..

His brother, Stuart (1922-1943) became a navigator in a Halifax Bomber but was killed while returning from a bombing raid."

Return Visits to Edinburgh

"In 1945, our family went out to Aden as my father, we stayed with my grandparents at Broompark Avenue.

 I remember:

-  the big house opposite Broompark Avenue Grandpa took me over there to see the baby chickens.

-  the dustbins for the pigs.

-  the coalman carrying sacks of coal through the house to the coalhouse at the bottom of the small garden."

Visits to Granton

 "I remember:

-  walking down to Granton Square with my dad and  having to sit very quietly at the Manager's Office in Royal Bank of Scotland at Granton Square

-  if we were home for Christmas, seeing the snow and watching the children sledge down the grassy slope overlooking Granton Square.  I was never allowed to join in!

-   going with my nana. to Ramage's,  the grocer's shop at West Granton Road

-  standing at the window and watching the workers leave Granton Wire Works at the end of the day."

Shops

"I remember:

-  going shopping to Goldenacre by tram with my nana.  I was totally fascinated by the fish shop there.  It had water running down the window all that time, but it looked to me as if it was running UPWARDS. I remember having a tantrum once because I didn't want to leave that window.

-  being taken down to Granton Square by my grandpa, to a small wooden shop, where we'd get a penny's worth of jelly babies.

He also took me up to the bowling green where he played.  I still have his bowls."

Jenny Cameron:  June 24, 2014

 

Recollections

30.

Hugh Gray

Australia

Devlin's net works at Granton have already been mentioned in Recollections 1 and 6 above.

Here, Hugh Gray gives more details.

Hugh wrote:

Net Works

141a, 141b, 141c Lower Granton Road

"There was a house in Lower Granton Road, situated half-way between Granton Square and Wardie Hotel.  From the front, it looked just like any other house, but it was used for making fishing nets. 

My sister Netta and her best pal, Jean Foley who married Eddie Nolan, worked there.  They both lived at the top of Granton Medway.  There were several Foleys who lived in the Medway.  I think Archie Foley may be one of them."

Archie Foley

Archie Foley has provided several recollections and  photos for the EdinPhoto web site.  He has also co-authored books on Portobello and was Chairman of Portobello Local  History Society until its demise a few years ago.                                      -  Peter Stubbs:  7 February 2016

Coal Man

"Archie also mentioned the coal man who lived up near the sweetie shop.  I remember we also used to get bleach from him decanted out of giant bottles with rope nets wrapped around them for protection. "

Granton Shops

"The name of the chemist at Granton shops, next door to the Beehive Stores was Mr Hay.

The drysalter across the road was called Watson.

There was a fish shop selling fresh fish, with water running down the window .

It was jist up from the Leith Co-op bakery.

Swimmer

Mr Smith owned Smiths grocery shop near the wireworks.  He was a great swimmer and had swum the English Channel

For practice, both he and my dad, Bill Gray had swum across the Forth from Granton to Burntisland.

Hugh Gray, Australia:  7 February 2016 (2 emails)

 

Recollections

31.

Dave Ferguson

Australia

Thank you to Hugh Gray for writing again. , this time sending me a photo.

Hugh wrote:

World War II

The Granton Ambulance Crew

Photo

Unfortunately, I've not been able to display the photo that Hugh sent to me.

I hope to be able to add the photo here soon.

"I believe that this photo is of the Ambulance Crew  from Granton.   I think they were based  at Granton School.

 My dad, Bill Gray of Granton Medway is  the  one in uniform on the  left of the photo."

Hugh Gray, Australia:  15 February 2016 (2 emails)

Recollections

32.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you to  Dave Ferguson's for sending me this photo of a model of a trawler that he built.

Model Trawler

'BONNIE JEAN'

Please click here to enlarge this photo and read
some of Dave's comments about trawling

 ©  Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:

Thank you to Dave for also sending me his poem, below, about trawling from Granton.

 

Trawling

"Steaming into Granton laden doon wi’ fish

The trawler crew are happy their mission accomplished,

They braved the cold North Sea and waves you never dreamed of, To put some lovely haddock upon the kitchen table.

 

The trawler man's a hardy man, fu’ o’ grit sae true,

Bringing in a grand meal just for me and you.

The lack o’ sleep, the stress o’ work, that would make a body cry,
Is the measure o’ the trawler men, that sail the seas so high.

 

They tend the nets, repair the breaks tae keep the catch intact.
They gut the fish and fill the boxes, then drop them doon the hatch. In the hold below they ice and stack the harvest,

Then clear the deck o’ debris an’ batten doon the hatches.

 

The work all done they can relax, and rest their weerie banes
Then steaming hame tae Granton, tae their wee Scottish hame.

DF.377

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  27 December 2016

Recollections

33.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you, Dave, for sending the seasonal poem below.

This poem, for a change, is not specific to Granton where Dave grew up.  However, I've added it to this page on the EdinPhoto web site in order to ensure that all of the poems that Dave has sent can be found on the same page.

Here is Dave's poem for Christmas:

 

Santa Claus is Coming

"Santa Claus is coming, Christmas time is near.

Children love the fun and all the Christmas cheer.

Presents in the morning, stockings full of toys,

Big feast on the table, everyone enjoys.

 

Mama in the kitchen, clearing up herself

Papa with his pipe, puffing away quite well

Everybody’s happy, Christmas is a joy

For Mama and Papa with all the girls and boys

 

Great fun when your wee, and a pleasure when your big

To have a merry Christmas at Mama and Papa’s gig

So merry Christmas to you all, we wish you all the best

Christmas time is wonderful  -  And Santa is the guest .

DF.377

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  27 December 2016

Recollections

34.

Dave Ferguson

Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland

Thank you, Dave, for sending the seasonal poem below.

This poem is not specific to Granton where Dave grew up.  However, I've added it along with Dave's Christmas poem above, to this page on the web site in order to ensure that all of the poems that Dave has sent can be found on the same page.

Here is Dave's poem for the New Year:

 

Welcome

Tae a Guid New Year

Welcome tae a guid New Year

Tae aw the folk that’s here

Frae Jinty, Dave & family

2017 is now surely near

 

Embrace yer friends,

Weld tight the bonds

Mak friendships new and strong

And ne’r forget, love and care

Help us get along

 

Enjoy yersells this New Year's morn

And hae some Fun and Cheer

Drink some wine or Barley Brie

And hae yersells

A GUID NEW YEAR

 

‘’A' THE BEST FER 2017’’  FRAE  JINTY, DAVE & FAMILY.  ‘’SLANTE!’’

DF.377

Dave Ferguson, Blairgowrie, Perth & Kinross, Scotland:  27 December 2016

 

 

 

North Edinburgh

Cramond - Granton - Royston - Trinity -  Wardie

Maps

Granton:  transport map 1932

Granton:  small map 1870

Granton:  large map 1870

Recollections

Cramond:                        from 1940s

Cramond Island:              1970s

Granton:                           1930s   1940s   1950s   1970s

Granton, Trinity, Wardie:  1940s   1950s - 60s   Shops

Lower Granton Road        all dates

Muirhouse                         from 1930s

Pilton:                               1940 bomb

Royston:                            from 1930s

Wardie School:                 1930s    1940s   1950s

                                         1960s    1970s   1980s

History

Granton, Trinity, Wardie:  from 1544

 

Recollections  -  More Pages

Recollections  -   Contributors

 

__________________

 

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