Telephone Kiosk

Styles

History

'Post Office Telephones' was created as a nationalised company in 1911.  It introduced a standard style of telephone box, or kiosk, the 'K1'. 

However, World War 1 intervened, so it was 1921 before the first K1 kiosks were installed.  The K1 was followed by many other styles.  See below.

Acknowledgements

1. I have taken most of the dates and details below from a Wikipedia page on red telephone boxes, and from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum (CVPHM) web site.

2. The thumbnail images illustrating the different styles have been taken from this CVPHM web site, with acknowledgement to Steve Knight/CVPHM.  Clicking these thumbnails will take you to a page on the CVPHM web site.

Today

The most common style of telephone kiosk to be found now is the KX, followed by some surviving K6s.  These are the only two styles that I have found and photographed, so far, in Edinburgh.

Introduced

Style

K=Kiosk

Comments

1921

K1

 Mk 234 (from 1921)

-  Concrete kiosk

-  Wooden door and wooden window frames

-  Cream with red door and window frames

-  5 windows in each side and in door

Mk 235/236 (from 1927)

-  Concrete kiosk

-  Wooden door and metal window frames

-  Cream with red door and window frames

-  8 windows in each side and in door

-  Few remain

K1, Mk 234

   An example of a K1 Mk 234 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

K1, Mk 236

   An example of a K1 Mk 236 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1926

K2

-  Cast iron kiosk, weighing over a ton

-  Designed by Giles Gilbert Scott

-  Almost all were installed in London

-  Red, 18 windows in each side and in door

K2

   An example of a K2 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1929

K3

-  Concrete kiosk

-  Similar to K2, but concrete

-  Cream with red glazing bars

-  18 windows in each side and in door

-  12,000 were installed.

-  Only 2 have survived

K3

   An example of a k3 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1927

K4

-  Cast iron kiosk, weighing 1.5 tons

-  Nicknamed  'The Vermilion Giant'

-  K2 style, but with postage stamp vending machine

-  Red, 18 windows in each side and in door

-  Only 50 were installed.

Only 4 are still in use

K4

   An example of a k4 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1934

K5

-  Plywood kiosk

-  Designed to be erected/dismantled for exhibitions

-  4 windows in each side and in door

-  None have survived

K5

   An example of a K5 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1936

K6

-  Cast iron kiosk

-  Designed by Giles Gilbert Scott.

-  Known as 'Jubilee Box'   (George V Silver Jubilee)

-  Red OR

-  Grey with red window frames (some rural areas)

-  24 windows in each side and in door

-  Note the narrow and broad windows

-  Initially, the design included George V Tudor Crown

-  St Edward's Crown or Crown of Scotland from 1952

-  70,000 were installed between 1936 and 1965

-  2,000 have survived and now have 'Listed' status

Edinburgh

High Street

K6 Telephone Boxes

    Telephone Boxes in the High Street. Edinburgh, November 2010

 

A brief note about the K6 box in National Geographic magazine said:

-  The K6 was the most popular style of box.

-   It was designed in 1936 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of King George V.

-  Some have now been sold and put to other uses:

-  One at Westbury-sub-Mendip in Somerset has been converted into a small library.

-  One at Settle in North Yorkshire has been converted into a small art gallery.

National Geographic,  August 2012

 

K6

   An example of a K6 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

K6 - Rural

   An example of a K6 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1959

K7

-  Anodised aluminium kiosk

-  Designed as a  prototype

-  Only 6 were installed.  2 survive, in preservation

K7

   An example of a K7 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1968

K8

-  Cast iron kiosk

-  Red, 1 window in each side and in door

-  11,000 installed.  Only 12 have survived

-  Most were replaced by KX100 (below) in 1984

K8

   An example of a k8 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

1980s

KX100

to

KX400

series

-  Anodised aluminium and stainless steel kiosk

-  Grey, 2 windows in each side and in door

-  Modern design (post-privatisation of GPO)

-  The first standardised BT kiosk

Edinburgh

in Princes Street

KX Telephone Boxes

    Police Box in the NW corner of East Princes Street Gardens  -  October 2010

KX 200

   An example of a KX 200 telephone kiosk  -  photo from the Colne Valley Postal History Museum web site

 

EDINBURGH

Telephone Kiosks in Edinburgh

Around Edinburgh

 

 

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