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Postcards and Recollections

St Margaret's Convent

Whitehouse Loan, Bruntsfield, Edinburgh

 

Postcard  -  St Margaret's Convent

©  Copyright: For permission to reproduce, please contact peter.stubbs@edinphoto.org.uk

 

St Margaret's Convent, Edinburgh  -  Pack of eight photogravure postcards

©  Copyright: For permission to reproduce, please contact peter.stubbs@edinphoto.org.uk

 

St Margaret's School and Convent

Recollections

BACKGROUND

The entrance to St Margaret's School was in Whitehouse Loan.  See the photograph above.

Some of the teachers at the school were nuns from St Margaret's Convent, round the corner in Strathearn Road.

Danny Callaghan, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  October 24, 2009

The Postcard
and some internal views of the convent

-  The Cloisters

-  Entrance Hall

-  High Altar

1.

Jan Still
Edinburgh

-  Early History

-  1960s

-  Today

-  Cottage

-  Postulants

2.

Lynda Maine
Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

-  Canada

3.

Madeline Beaumont Wirt
Gainesville, Georgia, USA

-  USA

-  Travel to School

-  First Day

-  At School

-  Francess Berry

4.

Madeline Beaumont Wirt
Gainesville, Georgia, USA

-  More Photos

-  Gillis House

5.

Jan Still
Edinburgh

School Houses

6.

Phyl Carruthers (nee Allan)
Belford, Northumberland, England

-  Age 5 to 8

-  St. Crescentia's

-  Spring Time

-  School Classes

-  Friends

-  Lunch Times

-  My Sisters

-  Moving On

-  Return to Edinburgh

7.

Jim Gilmour
Corby, Northamptonshire

-  Mass

-  Breakfast

-  Father Hamilton

8.

Judy Corr
Hendersonville, North Carolina, USA

-  RAF Kirknewton

-  Schoolwork

-  Teachers

-  Sports

9.

George Smith
Nanaimo, Vancouver Island,
British Columbia, Canada

-  The Building

-  School Hours

10.

Berenice Robertson
Toodyay, Western Australia, Australia

-  Day Students

11.

Berenice Robertson
Toodyay, Western Australia, Australia

-  Teachers

-  Uniforms

12.

Janice Vissenga
Edinburgh

-  Reply to Jan Still

13.

Janice Vissenga
Edinburgh

-  Nuns

-  Other Teachers

-  Shep

-  School Houses

-  Catholic School

14.

Linda Vaughan Kinser
Middletown, Ohio, USA

-  Nuns

-  Friends

15.

Sally Blackledge
known when at St Margaret's Convent as

Alison McGhee

and comments from

Peter Stubbs

and

Ian Stewart

-  Memories

-  Junior Classes

-  Senior Classes

-  The Building

-  Meals

-  Uniform

-  Today

-  The Gillis Centre

16.

Heather Durham
(
nee Macintyre)

Greece

-  1960s

17.

Karin Maxwell
(nee McKerron)

Tasmania, Australia

-  Early-1960s

18.

John Timms

-  1960s

19.

Kate Sainsbury
(
nee Kathleen Ablett)

-  1960s

-  Jan Still

20.

Phyl Carruthers (nee Allan)
Belford, Northumberland, England

-  Rebecca Murgatroid

21.

James Brodie
Edinburgh

-  Marchmont Road

-  Convent Wall

-  Following the Girls

22.

Graham Marshall
Southern Spain

-  Wall  by Warrender Baths

-  Inside the Convent

-  Bruntsfield House

-  Nuns

-  Crab Apples

23.

Susan McIntyre

-  1960 to 1972

-  My First Teachers

-  Headmistress

-  Other Teachers

-  Houses

-  Friends

24.

Paddy Harris

-  1974-79

-  Clapperton House

-  Teachers

-  The Gardener

25.

Jane Litherland (nee Oag)
Hathersgate, Derbyshire, England

-  1961

-  Age Seven

-  Prayers

-  Washing

-  Dormitories

-  Breakfast

-  Tea Time

-  The Nuns

-  We 'Did a Runner'

-  Return to School

-  Teachers

-  Friends

-  Study, Prayers and Bed

-  Bad Behaviour

-  Houses

-  Weekend

-  Education

-  Leaving School

-  Contact

26.

Delia Perrett
Perth, Western Australia, Australia

-  The Convent Building

-  Now a 'B and B'

-  My Schooldays

-  1963-68

-  Friends

-  Memories

-  School Holidays

27.

Suzanne Denny
(
nee Speirs)

near Yateley, Hampshire, England

-  1960

-  Mother Martina

-  School Lunches

-  The School Buildings

28.

Stan Urbaniak
Edinburgh

-  Mother Martina

29.

Avril Lamb (nee Capaldi)
Edinburgh

1960-72

-  Pupils

-  Other Memories

-  Best Wishes!

 

St Margaret's Convent

Postcard

Photogravure Postcards

This postcard is from a series described as 'Photogravure Post Cards - Edinburgh South Side'.  The cards were sold in packs of eight , packed in a window envelope, with a sheet of tissue between each card.

Neither the card not the packaging names the publisher.  This card has not been posted and there is no transport in the photo, so I find it difficult to say when the photograph might have been taken.

However, judging by the occasional vehicle that appears in other cards in this series, it might be reasonable to date the photograph as being around 1920.

Inside St Margaret's Convent

Here are two more postcards of St Margaret's convent.

These are interior views.  I don't know when the photos were taken.

 

 

Recollections

1.

Jan Still

Edinburgh

Thank you to Jan Still who was a boarder at St Margaret's Convent in the 1960s, for sending her recollections of the convent.

Jan sent me her recollections of:

the Cloister

Museum Hall

the High Altar

Jan also wrote:

Early History

"St Margaret’s was the first convent in Scotland after the Reformation.  When it was built, there was nothing but farmland around; hence perhaps the high walls surrounding all the buildings and playing fields.

The original gated door at the front was clad with iron (front and back) and internal wood, making a total depth about 5 ins. It had studs in a gothic style on the front.  There was a door, bolted and chained from the inside, through which we entered the main gates.

In my opinion, it gave the convent an imposing and portentous atmosphere.  There was also a carved stone rope on the wall above the gate, tracing the upper circle of the gate."

1960s

"I boarded at St Margaret's Convent in the 1960s, as my Father worked abroad in the Far East until he retired to Edinburgh.  I went there when I was 8, leaving at 18.

Even then, I loved the old buildings and architecture, though,  needless to say, we never bothered to take photos of our school! 

Today

"The convent is now the Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh and I believe a Seminary too.

The door has been renewed with a new wooden one, no doubt, to create as a softer, less daunting exterior, but ghastly in my opinion!  I think the carved stone rope on the wall above the gate has also been removed.

They have also upgraded the chapel, in what I would call a 'happy clappy' style. 

The playing fields are now modern flats.   Our netball court is now an entrance from Thirlstane Road with a car park!

Oh, well, t’was ever thus – creating 'carbuncles' out of lovely old buildings and unbuilt areas.  When will they ever learn?"

Cottage

"Behind the Chapel that you can see in the postcard is a little cottage.  The last I hear is that Cardinal Grey (who was an Archbishop when I was young) was being nursed in his old age by one of the nuns.  He may have passed by now.

Cardinal Gray died in 1993.

Postulants

"The Convent also owned a building (next to the now car park facing Thirlestane Road) in which the Postulants lived until they became consecrated Nuns.

The Nuns always told us that you had 7 years to make up your mind about giving your life to God for ever, and virtually no time to consider marriage!

The Postulants' house and its small crab-apple orchard was 'out of bounds' to the boarders.   Needless to say, one had to climb the wall and grab a crab-apple to prove you had so done. - innocent dares!  Unfortunately, the young do not seem to have such innocent games now, nor such a secure, protected childhood."

Jan Still,  Edinburgh: e-mail and guest book messages, December 28 + 29, 2007

 

Recollections

2.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Thank you to Lynda Maine, Edinburgh who wrote:

Canada

"This morning I noticed  there was an article about St. Margaret's Convent  Edinburgh.  Is that the one that used to be in Whitehouse Loan, Edinburgh?

If  it is, there is a sister convent called St. Margaret's Convent  in White Loan, Edmonton, Alberta Canada.  I will try and find out if it is still there."

Lynda Maine, Colinton,  Edinburgh:  January 3, 2008

St Margaret's Convent ©

Yes.  The photograph above is of St Margaret's Convent at  Whitehouse Loan, Edinburgh.

-  Peter Stubbs:  January 3,  2008

 

Recollections

3.

Madeline Beaumont Wirt

Gainesville, Georgia, USA

Thank you to Madeline Beaumont Wirt, now living in Gainesville, Georgia, USA, who wrote:

USA

"My father was in the US Air Force and he was stationed in Edinburgh, while I was a student at St Margaret's convent, approx 1961-1964.  I was in 2nd thru 5th grade (- USA grades).

I have many strong vivid and happy memories of St. Margaret's. I was a day student.  Most students were boarders."

Travel to School

" started school there at the age of 7 and I would get to school by taking the public buses (double deckers). I walked to the the bus stop and then had to change buses every day. (The first day I missed the change and the bus driver had to figure out what to do with me.)

I remember vividly going through the small door in the large arched gate. We would be met by the gate nun - she was always there each morning."

First Day

"My first day of school was the day of the week where we went to weekly confession. ( - lots of incense.)  I had no religious instruction prior to that day and I did not know anything about what was going on.  I was too shy too ask any questions (I was only 7 or 8).

I followed everyone else and when it was my turn, I walked to the door and opened it. It was a gigantic and creaking door. Inside was a tiny cubicle and it was dark. I heard a voice from out of nowhere telling me to "kneel down". I was scared to death but I knelt as instructed.  There was a silence.  The voice said, "Are you ready to make your confession"?  I answered,  "I am new.  I am from America."

I was very frightened.  The priest asked me to step outside.  He made arrangements for me to have 'instruction' every day during lunch and an elderly nun met with me and taught me and gave me a chocolate each day.  Eventually they deemed me ready for my First Confession and First Communion.

I was an adult before I had the nerve to share this story with my parents."

At School

I remember:

-  the beautiful grounds.  In the spring and summer we had our lessons in the field and we would make daisy chains as we listened to our teacher.

having sewing lessons in the room just over the gate house. We learned hemming and embroidery.

 - the chart where our 'marks' were recorded for conduct.  I mostly got bad marks for conduct - either talking too much, or my uniform missing pieces, or losing my homework - on and on.

- helping at lunch by setting the table, and clearing the table and doing the dishes.  At our lunches we had vegetables that the nuns had grown in their garden, especially potatoes and Brussel sprouts.

-  the grotto and the chapel.

being on the net ball team.

Francess Berry

"I remember the name of only one person during my time there. It was Francess Berry. She lived in Portobello and her mother had diabetes and had to give herself a shot every day, which I found to be shocking.

Francess: if you are reading this, please contact me.  I'd love to reminisce."

Madeline Beaumont Wirt, now living in Gainesville, Georgia, USA.
The details above are taken from a message left in the EdinPhoto Guest Book:  March 22, 2008

Contacting Madeline

Francess (or anybody else) if you would like to contact Madeline, please e-mail me and I'll give you her email address.

-  Peter Stubbs:  March 28,  2008

 

Recollections

4.

Madeline Beaumont Wirt

Gainesville, Georgia, USA

Thank you to Madeline Beaumont Wirt, Gainesville, Georgia, USA, who wrote in the EdinPhoto Guest Book:

More Photos

"Thank you for posting three more photos of St. Margaret's Convent!!!

   ©    PTA postcard  -  St Margaret's Convent, Edinburgh  -  The Cloisters ©    PTA postcard  -  St Margaret's Convent, Edinburgh  -  Entrance Hall ©

Gillis House

I read the recollections and have this question about the 'House of Gillis'

Was the Gillis House the one that wore the blue badges (and the three other houses wore red, yellow and green)? Dividing into teams with the colored badges is very British and unheard of here in the US. I'm pretty sure I was on the blue team and that we called it Gillis! I haven't thought of that for over 40 years!!   What fun!"

Madeline Beaumont Wirt, Gainesville, Georgia, USA:  .Guest Book: Jun 6, 2008

 

Recollections

5.

Jan Still

Edinburgh

Thank you to Jan Still, formerly a border at St Margaret's Convent in the 1960s, for providing the answer to Madeline's question.

Jan wrote:

School Houses

"The House Colours were:

-  Red      =  Trail

-  Green  =  Clapperton

-  Yellow =  Menzies

-  Blue     =  Gillis"

Jan also asked Madeline:

"Do the names of Janice, Karen, Joanie, Sheelagh and Paddy ring a bell with you?"

Jan Still, Edinburgh:  Jun 3+5+6, 2008

 

Recollections

6.

Phyl Carruthers (nee Allan)

Belford, Northumberland, England

Thank you to Phyl Carruthers who wrote:

Age 5 to 8

"I went to school at St. Margaret's from the age of 5 until I was about 8, about 1960 to 1963.

I remember the Mother Superior was Mother St. John. I was taught first by Mother Dympna (who once hit me over the head with a rolled up newspaper for being naughty) and then by Miss Murray and Miss Dick."

St Crescentia's

"I attended the building across the road from the convent, which was called St. Crescentia's and which is now, sadly, a funeral home.

I can also remember a nun called Mother St. Patrick who used to do the laundry and had very red hands."

Spring Time

"In the spring we used to be taken outside to collect sticky buds from the horse chestnut trees. I was always fascinated by the way the buds burst and the bright green leaves unfolded."

School Classes

We learned to write with flat sided pencils in books lined in red and blue. I still write with an italic hand.

We learned sums with the Cuisenaire Rod system."

Friends

I remember that there was another girl in my class, who was also a protestant, called Elizabeth.

We were excused going to chapel, although I recall going to the Corpus Christi services and feeling very envious of the little girls who were going to be taking their First Communion. They got to wear such pretty dresses.

There was a boy in our class for a while, called Jimmy, and I remember an Indian girl who was, I think, called Danuta. I remember she fell and gouged her knee on an iron gate stop."

Lunch Times

"I used to go home at lunch time because I lived in Warrender Park Road. My father worked at the North British Rubber Company in Fountainbridge and we would walk back up the road together after lunch."

My Sisters

"I remember Mother Dympna being quite taken by the fact that I had identical twin sisters who went to Easter Road to watch the Hibs play football with a pink teddy bear mascot that had his own Hibs strip in green and white.  They were big fans of Jim Easton and Joe Baker.

Later, my mum was personnel manageress at Goldbergs for a couple of years, and my sisters used to work there in the evenings with the man who did all the art displays.  I think his name was Kevin Hind.  They used to come home covered in glitter."

Moving On

"When I left St. Margaret's I went to Sciennes for a couple of years until we moved to Newcastle. My sisters went to Gillespies and my brother to Heriots."

Return to Edinburgh

"I was up in Edinburgh a few weeks ago and Cuthill's the Butcher is still in Warrender Park Road.

I was sad to see the convent.  I remember it always being in a state of high polish with a lovely smell of polish - but the stone rope is still above the main gate.  I was very happy there."

Phyl Carruthers nee Allan, Belford, Northumberland, England:  August 15, 2008

 

Recollections

7.

Jim Gilmour

Corby, Northamptonshire, England

Thank you to Jim who wrote about his memories of Father Hamilton, who he describes as his mentor at St Katherine's Church, Gracemount.

Did Father Hamilton also have connections with St Margaret's Convent in Edinburgh.

Acknowledgement:  Jim Gilmour, Corby, Northamptonshire, England:  August 15, 2008

 

Recollections

8.

Judy Corr (nee Valersky)

Thank you to Judy  who replied to Madeline Beaumont Wirt's messages in 'Recollections 3' and 'Recollections 4' above.

Judy wrote:

USAF - Kirknewton

"Madeline:  I was so happy to see more pictures of my school.  My Dad was in the USAF in Kirknewton, too.  We were there 1952 through 1955.  My Dad died shortly after his 90th birthday, about a year ago."

Schoolwork

"I have so many memories of school.  We did most of our work in rough copy  and then transferred what we wrote into good books that had the school name embossed in gold lettering on the covers."

Teachers

"I started in Transition Form

I remember:

-  Mother Celceus

-  Miss Bodie (Geography)

- Miss Auntphont (spelling off, but that is the way her name was pronounced)."

Sports

"I played field hockey and  tennis.  I remember striped summer dresses.

So many memories.  I hope to hear from you."

Judy Corr (nee Valersky), Hendersonville, North Carolina, USA:  September 2, 2008

 

Recollections

9.

George T Smith

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Thank you to George T Smith who wrote:

The Building

"I'm finding the correspondence about the convent very interesting.

I remember the sturdy iron clad door and the carved rope around the lintel from my days spent in the neighbourhood while at  school at Boroughmuir.  It was certainly an impressive building."

School Hours

"I regret that, at the time, I did not have the curiosity to ask questions about the place, and had no idea it was a school.

It seems that the school hours there were likely to have started earlier than ours - note  the Altar Boy who started at 7.30am.  So we would be unlikely to have seen quietly uniformed young girls trooping towards the gate."

George T Smith, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada:  September 6, 2008

 

Recollections

10.

Berenice Robertson (nee Beard)

Toodyay, Western Australia, Australia

Thank you to Berenice Robertson who wrote:

Day Student

"I am a former student of St. Margaret's Convent.  I seem to remember being there as one of the only Day Students from an early age, with a break to other schools as my parents moved around Edinburgh'

I did do all my senior years there to 'O Level' or perhaps a bit younger, then left to go to work to help support our family.

I'd  love to reminisce with any student from there.  The name I remember most is Nora Simpson"

Berenice Robertson (nee Beard), Toodyay, Western Australia, Australia:  February 9, 2009

Contacting Berenice

If you would like to send a message to Berenice, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to her.

-  Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  February 9, 2009

 

Recollections

11.

Berenice Robertson (nee Beard)

Toodyay, Western Australia, Australia

Thank you to Berenice Robertson who added:

Teachers

"Does anybody remember:

-  the French teacher we had who always dressed in a very male fashion?

-  the male Art teacher we had for a while?

-  the very pretty English teacher?"

Uniforms

"Sister Mary Margaret was always on my case regarding the uniform!

I was a Day Student who lived in a Boarding House in Thirlestane Road.  We were a large  family with Dad being out of work quite a lot, so I did not always wear the correct skirt, blouse, etc. if Mum & Dad couldn't afford these items."

Berenice Robertson (nee Beard), Toodyay, Western Australia, Australia:  April 2, 2009

 

Recollections

12.

Janice Vissenga

Edinburgh

Thank you to Janice Vissenga who wrote:

Reply to Jan Still

"I attended St. Margaret's Convent as a boarder from approx 1966 to 1975.

I recognise some names and places in the comments above.   On the whole, I had some fond memories of the school.

Jan Still, whose name I do not recognise, asks (in 5 above) if anyone knew a Janice who attended the school, probably around the same time as myself.   I wonder if she is relating to myself?"

Janice Vissenga, Edinburgh:  May 7, 2009

I have given Jan Still's email address to Jan Vissenga, so I hope they are able to get in touch with each other.

-  Peter Stubbs:  May 7, 2009

 

Recollections

13.

Janice Vissenga

Edinburgh

Thank you to Janice Vissenga sent more recollections of the Convent.

Janice wrote:

Nuns

"I remember:

-  The top two  nuns, Mother Superior, Mother Ignatius and  Sister St. John.

-  Sister Kieran.  She liked me because I was good at art and sewing!

-  Sister Fildema who became Sister Christina.  She was the nicest nun of all.  I recall she was very young.  She had polio and taught piano.

-  There was a horrid nun (her name escapes me) but she looked after Kindergarten, over in the dormitory area.  She was forever cutting the boarder girls' hair with a bowl.  We were all petrified of her!!

- Sister Daphne and St. Justina.  They looked after the dormitories."

Other Teachers

"I remember:

-  Miss Omphrey, the French teacher

-  Miss Gordon, the Geography teacher.  She didn't like me. She caught me cheating at exams and mimicking her in front of a School Inspector!"

Shep

Let's not forget about Shep the dog!!

School Houses

"I was in the Gillis House (blue).

I remember Clapperton (green) had the brainiest pupils.

There were also Trail House (red), and a yellow house whose name I can't remember."

Catholic School

"Like one of your other senders, I also was not a Catholic but still had to go to Mass and Benediction.

I always felt a little bit left out of things, although I loved Saint Days because we got to have coffee and toast for breakfast and chips and cakes later on!!  

I also loved summer when we wore our summer uniform and studied outside beside the Grotto and Laburnum tree."

Janice Vissenga, Edinburgh:  May 7, 2009

 

Recollections

14.

Linda Vaughan Kinser

Middletown, Ohio, USA

Thank you to Linda Vaughan Kinser for leaving a message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Janice wrote:

Nuns

"My sister, Maria, and I attended as boarders during the 1950s and 1960s. We fondly remember:

-  Mother Phadelma Joseph

-  Sister Mary Patrick

-  Mother John."

Friends

"My friends were:

-  Magdalen McLellan

-  Andrena Devlin

-  Pamela Fox

-  Otelia Saxil

-  Maria Torello.

I am interested in contacting anyone in the school. I also would appreciate any information about any of the persons mentioned above"

Linda Vaughan Kinser:  Middletown, Ohio, USA:  Message left in EdinPhoto guestbook, Jul 8, 2009.

UPDATE

Note for Linda Vaughan Kinser

Hi Linda.  Thanks for the message above that you left in the EdinPhoto guest book.  I've now received an email from Andrena, who was in your class at St Margaret's in the 1960s.

She would like to contact you.  So, can you send you please email me to let me know your email address, then I'll pass it on to Andrena.  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs:  October 5, 2009

 

Recollections

15.

Sally Blackledge

At St Margaret's Convent, Sally was known as

Alison McGhee

Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you to Sally Blackledge who wrote:

Memories

"How interesting to read others’ memories of St Margaret’s Convent,  and how nearly – but not quite – they chime with mine. Jan Still was in the year above me, and her memories match mine most closely."

Junior Classes

 I attended as a Non-Catholic Day Girl from about 1958 in Form 2, until my family left Edinburgh in about 1964.

 In Form 2, upstairs in St Crecentia’s, we had the wonderfully kind young nun, Mother Kenneth.

 We then moved over the road, to the main building, for Transition (P6 & P7) with the rather fierce Mother Bernadette. Initially we were in a classroom converted from the nun’s recreation room, as there had been a severe fire. Later we moved into a lovely refurbished classroom, on the top floor."

Senior Classes

 In the Senior classes we had a fairly steady teaching staff during my time there:

-  Mother Teresa Margaret taught Maths.

-  Mother John, the Headmistress, taught Latin.

-  Mlle Anfry, rather severe, had 2 outfits, one for winter  for ¾ of the year, and a modification of that in the summer term..

-  Miss Maclean took English and History, though Miss Robertson spent some time at  the school, teaching English.

-  Mother Kieran, Art and Needlework.

-  First Miss Burchill, and then Miss Woodhawks taught Science.

-  Miss Boddie, and then Miss Gordon, for Geography.

-  Miss MacDonald for Music.

-  Mrs Nowasielska for Gym and Games."

The Building

"I loved the aesthetic nature of the building.  Even as a small child I appreciated that I was privileged to play and work in a beautiful environment. The Museum Hall had a wonderfully varied collection of treasures, all lovingly cleaned and polished.

 Assemblies were held in the long, narrow Hall on an upper floor. There was a small stage at one end, and I remember at least two productions:

 - 'The Importance of Being Earnest' by a class a year or so older than mine, and

-  a sort of sub 'Mikado' operetta.

Behind the Hall was quite the gloomiest room in the universe – The Library.  I can’t imagine why it seemed so dull, but I never wanted to linger."

Meals

"Meals were less than enthralling. The kitchen was in a basement, close to the Day Girls’ Entrance and Cloakroom. My heart would sink as I scuttled up a flight of stone stairs to escape the cabbage smell that lingered."

Uniform

"The uniform was fairly standard – gymslip or skirt, knee length fawn socks and brown shoes. What made the ensemble outstanding was the blazer edged with purple and white striped braid, with a beautiful shield-shaped badge on the breast pocket. The badge showed St Margaret herself, with the school motto “Scio cui servio” (I know whom I serve).  Berets and gloves were mandatory out of school.

 The building has gone through a number of identities since it was “The Convent”. It is now a conference centre run by the Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh."

Sally Blackledge, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland:  September 6, 2009

Today

The building, as Sally says, is now a conference centre run by the Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh.  But it also includes Bed & Breakfast accommodation.

It is known as 'Gillis Centre' and has been graded as a 3-star Guest House by Visit Scotland.

Peter Stubbs:  September 6, 2009

Thank you to Ian Stewart who added:

The Gillis Centre

"There are also Archdiocesan offices and a Library in the Centre, as well as the fine Chapel. 

The centre is named after Bishop Gillis, early to mid 19th century Bishop of what was then the Eastern District of the Catholic Church in Scotland."

Ian Stewart, Morningside, Edinburgh:  November 18, 2009

 

Recollections

16.

Heather Durham

(nee MacIntyre)

Greece

Thank you to Heather Durham for posting a message in the EdinPhoto guest book.

Heather wrote:

1960s

"I chanced on the EdinPhoto site when doing ancestry research.  How amazing to see the St. Margaret's stuff!!

I went to school there in the 1960s and remember:

-  Anna Pettigrew

-  Anne Argent

-  Mandy?.

We were boarders in the senior school. Does this jog anyone's memory?   Do get in touch!"

Heather Durham, Greece:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, September 20, 2010

Reply to Heather?

I don't know Heather's email address, so if you'd like to contact her, the easiest way would probably be to post a reply below the  message that she posted in the EdinPhoto guest book on September 20, 2010.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  September 21, 2010

Update

July 2011

Hello Heather:

I hope you read this!  I have just received an email from Marion Hart, now living in Saudi Arabia.  She has a message that she would like me to pass on to you, but I don't have your email address.  If you can tell me your email address, I'll pass on Marion's message to you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 21, 2011

 

Recollections

17.

Karin Maxwell

(nee McKerron)

Tasmania, Australia

Thank you to Heather Durham for posting a message in the EdinPhoto guest book and sending me an email.

Karin wrote:

Early-1960s

"I've been looking for past students from St Margaret's Boarding School, Whitehouse Loan, Edinburgh.  I boarded there in the early-1960s.

Looking at the entries above brought back vivid recollections.  And yes, that awful cabbage smell from the kitchens below the boarders' dining hall – I remember it well.

I remember:

-  Elvira Neri

-  Philomena Kane

-  Heather MacInyre

-  Delia Perrit

-  the Visocchi sisters

-  the McLellan sisters, especially the late Magdalen McLellan who showed me great kindness.

It would be great to catch up.

Karin Maxwell (nee McKerron), Tasmania, Australia,:
email + message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, May 14, 2011

Reply to Karin?

If you'd like to contact Karin, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to her.    Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  May 14, 2011

 

Recollections

18.

John Timms

Essex

John Timms wrote:

1960s

"I  was at St Margaret's day school in the 1960s.  I remember some of the girls in my class:

-  the twins, Fifi (Fiona) and Debbie

-  Sheila Mckenzie

-  Linda (I forget her last name.

The nuns that I remember are:

-  Mother Mary Martina

-  Mother Mary (I'm not sure of her full name.)

If anybody recognises any of these names it would be good to hear from them."

John Timms, Essex, England:  July 25, 2011

Reply to John?

If you'd like to send a message to John, please email me, then I'll pass it on to him.    Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 28, 2011

 

Recollections

19.

Kate Sainsbury (nee Kathleen Ablett)

Thank you to Kate Sainsbury, nee Kathleen Ablett, who wrote:

1960s

"I  was a boarder at St Margaret's Convent.  Reading the memories above has brought back so many memories.  I'd love to be able to contact Jan Still who wrote 'Recollections 1 and 5' above.  She was in my year at the Convent.."

Kate Sainsbury (nee Kathleen Ablett):  September 27, 2011

Jan Still

I've now passed on to Kate the latest contact details that I have for Jan.  I hope that Jan is still using the same email address, and that Kate will be able to contact her.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  October 3, 2011

 

Recollections

20.

Phyl Carruthers (nee Allan)

Belford, Northumberland, England

Thank you to Phyl Carruthers for adding to the comments that she sent in Recollections 6 above.

Phyl wrote:

Rebecca Murgatroid

"I've now remembered the name of another of the girls in my class at St. Margaret's.

She was Rebecca Murgatroyd. I think she went to the Royal School of Ballet in London eventually.  Her father was my father's boss at the North British Rubber Company.

I think she had several brothers.  Her family lived on Regent's Terrace and her birthday parties were legendary."

Phyl Carruthers nee Allan, Belford, Northumberland, England:  November 19, 2011

 

Recollections

21.

James Brodie

Edinburgh

Thank you to James Brodie for sending his memories of the convent below.  It will be interesting to see if any of the former pupils (or nuns!) reply to James' comments.

James wrote:

Marchmont Road

"I was born in January 1941 and grew up at the top of Marchmont Road, which meant that St. Margaret's Convent lay within the boundaries of the local 'gang' of boys like myself."

Convent Wall

"The Warrender swimming baths were a great draw for us and on sunny days, after swimming, a group of us would gather to sit on the narrow ledge of walling that ran along the bottom of the girls' playing fields. Well, no matter how much the fierce nuns remonstrated with us we refused to budge, and we lived in constant fear of falling off the wall.

Our suspicion that the girls liked us being there seemed to be born out by the great frequency with which the ball came our way!  As the post-war age structure of our group was large, the girls did not realise what a major contribution they made to male adolescent development."

Following the Girls

"Possibly on a Sunday, a 'crocodile' would emerge from the arched gateway and girls and nuns set off in a procession down Thirlstane Road, closely followed by 'us', making loud but innocent comments -  and on occasion, pelting them with snowballs.

Sometimes we would follow like this right down to the Blackford Hills and round to the burn, where we tailed off.  So, girls and nuns (some of whom were just girls themselves) and the rascal boys all had fun - I'm sure."

James Brodie, Edinburgh:  January 2, 2012

 

Recollections

22.

Graham Marshall

Southern Spain

Thank you to Graham Marshall for following up the comments from James Brodie above.

Graham wrote:

Wall by Warrender Baths

"Although my childhood in Marchmont was through the 1950s and early-1960s, I can identify with the magnetic appeal of the convent school and its boarding house over the road beside Warrender Church

I seem to remember it was never the young ladies who objected to our gathering in the gloaming by the gate.  I also remember well that short piece of wall at the top of the stairs to the right of the entrance to Warrender Baths.

It did indeed overlook the playing fields and gave access to a ledge along which it was possible to walk all the way to Thirlestane Lane, pursued at one end by nuns and the other by the boilerman from the baths."

Inside the Convent

"I also remember the Sunday crocodile setting off down Whitehouse Loan towards the Blackfords, more carefully guarded than any royal convoy by black-robed nuns.

Curiously, I also have memories of the inside for in those days I took an interest in Marchmont and was writing my first book (never published) on the Bruntsfield Estate.

A friend, one of the many spinster ladies in the area, suggested asking the convent for information. It was with trepidation I rang the bell operated by a long black metal bar and waited until eventually Sister Gatekeeper opened the postern a crack, and asked my business.

I was told to wait, outside the door in the street.  The postern was closed and silence returned for several long minutes. The door opened again, this time fully, and i was invited to enter.

I was escorted through the pend and across the inner courtyard by my guide, who I later discovered was Sister John, the guest master."

Bruntsfield House

"Sister John showed me into one of the three guest parlours where visitors met the nuns.  Shortly afterwards I was introduced to a warm and friendly old lady, Mother Cuthbert, a retired Reverend Mother.

She remembered the convent and its next door neighbour while Bruntsfield House was still a family home, I sat entranced while she told tales of the flag being raised when the admiral was at home and him leaving by carriage for his ship in Leith."

Nuns

"We met several times and as we became friendlier.  I was treated to more than one guided tour through the convent. I remember the forbidding chapel and nuns everywhere.

These were the days when there were still many nuns about, from Scotland, France where the mother house lay and, of course, Ireland."

Crab Apples

"Your correspondent who remembered the crab apples will know it was not only the boarders who stole apples, although to this day I don’t understand why as they tasted awful!

The postulant wore white habits and were often seen walking the streets near the convent in twos, and they were young enough to be tempted into conversation by the teenage youth."

Marchmont

"St Margaret’s a part of the old Marchmont destined not to survive in its original form.  I also remember Bruntsfield House and its home park before the new school (about to be redeveloped I believe) -  but most of the old institutions are still there albeit in different guises and speak well of the Victorian developers who constructed a district which will live on relatively unchanged for a very long time to come."

Graham Marshall, Southern Spain:  January 5, 2012

 

 

Recollections

22.

Graham Marshall

Southern Spain

Thank you to Graham Marshall for following up the comments from James Brodie above.

Graham wrote:

Wall by Warrender Baths

"Although my childhood in Marchmont was through the 1950s and early-1960s, I can identify with the magnetic appeal of the convent school and its boarding house over the road beside Warrender Church

I seem to remember it was never the young ladies who objected to our gathering in the gloaming by the gate.  I also remember well that short piece of wall at the top of the stairs to the right of the entrance to Warrender Baths.

It did indeed overlook the playing fields and gave access to a ledge along which it was possible to walk all the way to Thirlestane Lane, pursued at one end by nuns and the other by the boilerman from the baths."

Inside the Convent

"I also remember the Sunday crocodile setting off down Whitehouse Loan towards the Blackfords, more carefully guarded than any royal convoy by black-robed nuns.

Curiously, I also have memories of the inside for in those days I took an interest in Marchmont and was writing my first book (never published) on the Bruntsfield Estate.

A friend, one of the many spinster ladies in the area, suggested asking the convent for information. It was with trepidation I rang the bell operated by a long black metal bar and waited until eventually Sister Gatekeeper opened the postern a crack, and asked my business.

I was told to wait, outside the door in the street.  The postern was closed and silence returned for several long minutes. The door opened again, this time fully, and i was invited to enter.

I was escorted through the pend and across the inner courtyard by my guide, who I later discovered was Sister John, the guest master."

Bruntsfield House

"Sister John showed me into one of the three guest parlours where visitors met the nuns.  Shortly afterwards I was introduced to a warm and friendly old lady, Mother Cuthbert, a retired Reverend Mother.

She remembered the convent and its next door neighbour while Bruntsfield House was still a family home, I sat entranced while she told tales of the flag being raised when the admiral was at home and him leaving by carriage for his ship in Leith."

Nuns

"We met several times and as we became friendlier.  I was treated to more than one guided tour through the convent. I remember the forbidding chapel and nuns everywhere.

These were the days when there were still many nuns about, from Scotland, France where the mother house lay and, of course, Ireland."

Crab Apples

"Your correspondent who remembered the crab apples will know it was not only the boarders who stole apples, although to this day I don’t understand why as they tasted awful!

The postulant wore white habits and were often seen walking the streets near the convent in twos, and they were young enough to be tempted into conversation by the teenage youth."

Marchmont

"St Margaret’s a part of the old Marchmont destined not to survive in its original form.  I also remember Bruntsfield House and its home park before the new school (about to be redeveloped I believe) -  but most of the old institutions are still there albeit in different guises and speak well of the Victorian developers who constructed a district which will live on relatively unchanged for a very long time to come."

Graham Marshall, Southern Spain:  January 5, 2012

 

Recollections

23.

Susan McIntyre

Thank you to Susan McIntyre who wrote:

1960 to 1972

My First Teachers

"I was at St Margaret’s Convent from 1960 to 1972. My first teachers were:

-  Primary 1:  Mother Dympna

-  Primary 2:  Miss Murray

-  Primary 3:  Miss Dick

-  Primary 4:  Miss Murray."

Headmistress

"Mother St John was the headmistress and taught English and Latin. I remember her becoming very annoyed when I said I didn’t want to learn Latin.

There was benediction every Thursday after school in the Chapel and we had to go.  Mother St John caught me sneaking away one Thursday and gave me a real row.

When she retired, she was replaced by Sister Mary Carr."

Other Teachers

"I remember:

-   Mother St Patrick

-  Mother Fidelma.  She later changed her name back to Margaret. She had been a St Margaret's girl herself, Margaret Connor.

-   Miss Anfry, the French teacher - a scary lady!

-   Miss Brown, who taught Gym

-  Miss Gordon, who taught Geography

-  Mrs Hare, who taught  history and was replaced by Miss King."

Houses

"We weren’t put in a house until we were in the 'big' school.  I was in Menzies (the yellow one). Every Friday at lunchtime, the houses had a house meeting.

If you had an order mark (which was a punishment) you had to stand at the back of the house and explain yourself. Every order mark cancelled out an 'A'. At the end of the year, the house with the most 'A's won the house cup."

Friends

"I remember that an American girl was in my class for a while but I can’t remember her name.

My best friends in Primary 1 were:

-   Susan Mackay and

-  Elizabeth Callicott.

I remained friends with them until I left school.

Other names I remember are:

-  Sanjukta Nandy

-  Danuta Mackay

-  Danuta Jastrebska

-  Frances Connor.

Around 1970, Craiglockart Convent closed and many of their pupils joined our school."

Susan McIntyre:  February 3, 2011

 

Recollections

24.

Paddy Votadrini (nee Harris)

Thank you to Paddy (Patricia) who wrote:

1974-79

Clapperton House

"I was a student from 1974 to 1979, in Clapperton House."

Teachers

"The teachers that I remember are:

-  Sister. Mary Carr, Headmistress and Latin/French teacher.

-  Miss King, history.  She had a flash sports car.

-  Miss Gordon, Geography.  I got into trouble doing an impression of her pulling her robe around her and talking about her cats!

-   Mrs Train, Latin.  She was great fun, always quoting romantic poetry and Shakespeare (Gather ye rosebuds while ye may.)

-  Miss ?, Latin.  She wore flowing robes and wove scarves through her hair, filed her nails to points and made us pray in Latin before class.

-  Mrs ?, English.  She was good fun.  She had a niece, Rachel Hawkes, who was my best friend

-  St. John Bosco, music, could rock a mean folk guitar

-  Sister Christinna (aka Teenie Bash) would terrorize us driving around the grounds while learning to drive on the convent's mini

The Gardener

"I remember the Gardener and his dog.  We kidnapped his garden gnome and ransomed it for Mars bars, I don't recall whether he paid up or not!"

Paddy (Patricia) Votadrini, (nee Harris), Utah, USA :  February 12, 2012

 

Recollections

25.

Jane Litherland (nee Oag)

Hathersgate, Derbyshire, England

Thank you to Jane Litherland for sending me all her memories below of the years that she spent at St Crescentia's.

St Crescentia's has already been mentioned in Recollections 6 above.

Jane explained that St Crescentia's was part of St Margaret's convent.  It was  the name of the site across the road from the main convent buildings.

St Crescentia's comprised a junior school classroom, a playground and dormitories.

St  Crescentia

Incidentally, I found a connection between St Crescentia and St Margaret's Convent. 

This page on the British Listed Buildings web site reports that in the Lady Chapel at St Margaret's Convent, 113 Whitehouse Loan, Edinburgh, there is a painted Gothic casket containing relics of St Crescentia.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  26 November, 2012

The recollections from both Phyl (6 above) and Jane (below) come from the early-1960s.

Jane wrote:

1961

Age Seven

"I started at St Crescentia's, aged 7 years in 1961 as a day-girl and later became a boarder."

Prayers

"I have vivid memories of praying a lot!  First thing in the morning Mother Ender or Mother Saint Patrick would come into the dormitory ringing the bell with "Morning girls - get down on your knees and say your Morning Offering."

Washing

"We would collect water (for washing in), carrying large plastic jugs from a room with a large sink back to the dorm and pour the water into a plastic basin, wash there and carry the slops back to the sink room."

Dormitories

"I was in various dormitories throughout my school career.  I remember starting off in 'Holy Angels' with Mother Martina in charge. One bath a week!  Sanitary towels were dispensed by Mother Saint Patrick in humongous Dr White's boxes discreetly covered in brown paper."

Breakfast

"We all prayed on our knees in the large hall at St Crescentia's after getting dressed before 'going over the other side' - the expression universally used for crossing the road to the main convent where we had breakfast in the refectory - which for some reason or other we all pronounced as the 'refretry'."

One child would be a server at each table.  They would carry four plates at a time until the table was served.  If we wanted large portions the server asked for 'extraordinary'."

Tea Time

"We boarders had 'tuck boxes' to which we were allowed access to at tea time.  Tea was bread and butter and very lurid jam, so home comforts were a boon.

Food generally was pretty ghastly.  I have vivid memories of lumpy semolina and frogs eyes."

The Nuns

"The custom was to curtsey every time one saw a nun - and as it was a busy convent, much of the day was spent bobbing up and down saying "good morning/good afternoon, Sister" as we went about the school.

Yes, the nuns changed from being Mothers to Sisters somewhere along the way."

We 'Did a Runner'

"I remember running away from St Margaret's when I was 10 because some of us boarders felt we were being victimised by one of the nuns. Whilst we were on boarders' duties of cleaning the classroom after school - Helen Robertson, Felicity Sheridan and I did a runner and caught the bus to Portobello where we had decided we would live indefinitely with Felicity's Aunty."

Return to School

"Several hours later, after Felicity's Uncle had come home horrified to find us there, we were quickly despatched back to school.  We were 'sent to Reverend Mother' (in the Parlour), severely told off and sent to Chapel to say we were sorry to God.

We remained in enforced disgrace for a couple of weeks and were sent to Coventry, but actually were considered rather heroic by the other girls.  Poor Felicity for some reason or other seemed to get most of the blame and left soon after.

The nuns and girls had apparently all been looking for us for hours outside in the rain and one can imagine the school's panic."

Teachers

"Miss Anfrey (French) was a hoot, and always wore the same brown leather boots.

Mrs Macnamara was very jolly and taught biology; I remember her occasionally producing a plastic transparent naked woman evidently to be used for illustration purposes, but I never remember her getting below the neck without turning pink. Human reproduction was a matter of reading from pages x to y, and certainly had no illustrations

Mother John was Headmistress.  She taught me Latin; she was an inspirational enthusiastic teacher and wonderful person, but Lord help us if we misbehaved.

Sister Fidelma Joseph was a great singing teacher and went on to become reverend mother.

Sister Kieran taught sewing and loved raising money for the 'Elna' - a sewing machine, I believe, but I never used it."

Friends

"My best friend for years was May Pettigrew.

I was huge friends with:

- Christine Maclellan

Maureen Galbraith

Colette Duddy

Marilyn Macready

 and later on

Monica Macduff (now Monica Wilson).

I remember Rosa and Donna Visocchi and how Mother John laughed when their father snored through our concerts.

I remember looking up with awe to older girls who seemed very sophisticated.

Wanda Kaye

Alison Groves

Loreto Maclellan

Study, Prayers and Bed

"We all stood for the 'Angelus' at mid-day. We had study after tea until supper.  We went to chapel after supper for Night Prayers before going back 'over the other side' to bed - and prayers again before lights out.

 Because of enforced 'lights out', at exam time we used to do our last-minute swotting under our sheets and blankets in bed by torch light."

Bad Behaviour

"Bad behaviour or poor work was punishable by receiving 'Order Marks' and very bad behaviour merited a 'Conduct Mark' - a real shock-horror event."

Houses

"We were all in Houses and there was a lot of competition between the houses:

Gillis,

Trail

Menzies

Clapperton.

Basically all sport, academic and artistic achievement benefited the house - so competition was a pretty motivating factor for just about everything  -  all incredibly politically incorrect I suppose."

Weekends

"We had endless weekend walks up Arthur's Seat and to The Museum in 'crocodiles', then when we were older we were allowed to wear our own clothes at weekends and even go out for a couple of hours.

We would have a coffee in George Street and sneak fags back to school and think we were wicked."

Education

"I'm not sure if any of us was all that brilliant academically.  The idea was that we would be strong characters, and there were a lot of those about.

It was a quirky, slightly crazy school by modern standards maybe - but I loved it."

Leaving School

"Sadly, I had to leave before Highers - but I always stayed in touch with Mother John.  Years later, she came to visit me at home in Derbyshire.  (I was married with I think 3 children at that stage.)

She told me that after she left St Margaret's she ended up teaching at a comprehensive in Wales where all the nuns were 'penguins' - no curtseying there - but unsurprisingly she loved that school too and, reading between the lines, the kids there loved her too. She was a remarkable person."

Contact

"I'd like to hear from anyone. 

Monica is the only person I am still in touch with and she has remained a great friend."

Jane Litherland, nee Oag, Hathersgate, Derbyshire, England:  November 6+25, 2012

Reply to Jane

If you'd like to send a reply to Jane, please email me, then I'll pass on her email address to you.    Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  November 26, 2012

 

Recollections

26.

Delia Perrett

Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Thank you to Delia Perrett who wrote:

The Convent Building

Now a  'B and B'

"By chance a colleague of mine is in Edinburgh and I asked her to take a look along White House Loan to see if the old St Margaret's Convent school was still there.

Yes, the building is still there, but not as a school.  So in an idle moment at work I went on the net just to see if and when the place changed from a school to a 'B and B'."

My Schooldays

1963-68

"Imagine my surprise to find all the folk who are connected to the place and asking about past students. 

I began at St Margaret's Convent  in 1963 and left the joint in 1968 to commence nursing.  I'm still slogging along in 'Health', albeit in Perth, Western Australia."

Friends

"I lost touch with my school mates as we came from all over the world.  My parents were living in Kenya and then went to live in Malawi and then, in my final years, in South Africa.

I see Karin McKerron, now living in Tassie, gave me a mention in her 'Recollections 17' above.   I'd love to be in touch with her again.   I don’t know if she remembers half the mob that we used to know.

I have a pan photo of all the school students hanging in my house, as well as a class photo taken in 1966."

Memories

"I remember:

-  the dog, 'Jip'.   She was loved by everyone.

-  being made to get up every morning to say prayers on our knees.  Oh, how I hated that.

-  playing hockey for the school, which I loved.  I wonder if the hockey pitch is still there?

-  the cold in winter.  I hated it.  Every year in November we were dragged off to Edinburgh Castle to visit St Margaret’s Chapel.   I remember the snow and the bitter winds up there on the parapet!"

School Holidays

"As I could not go home to Africa for most school holidays.  I stayed with:

-   Pamela Fox and her sisters and brothers.

-  Anne Stoddert. Her folks lived in India and retired to Edinburgh.

-  my talented artist friend, Andrena Devlin.  Her Mum had a Chinese restaurant opposite the Odeon cinema where we saw 'The Sound of Music'.  Man, that's  so long ago!"

Delia Perrett, Perth, Western Australia, Australia:  August 29, 2012

 

Recollections

27.

Suzanne Denny (nee Spiers)

near Yateley, Hampshire, England

Thank you to Suzanne Denny who wrote:

1968

"I started St Margaret's at the age of four, in August 1968. Unfortunately I was only there for 5 terms as I was taken kicking and screaming to live  in England.

Mother Martina

"I remember Mother Martina, sitting at her desk as I was learning to read.  Sometimes she let my little sister stay for part of the day.   After she retired she moved to a convent in Paisley.   My mother kept in touch with her until she died."

School Lunches

"When I was at St Margaret's, the junior school was over the road from the Convent.  That building is now an undertakers.

I remember hating school lunches, so when my grandfather retired, during my first term, I used to go my grandparents' house in Barclay Place for lunch.

There was a sweet shop that we sometimes stopped at on the way back to school."

The School Buildings

In P1, we were in he Victorian part of the building.  The room seemed huge to me with lots of big windows.

In P2 we were in the new section.  I remember we were taken over the road to the convent, and I remember  meeting someone important.  I've been told it was Archbishop Gray.

The names of classmates that I can remember (forgive spelling mistakes) are:

-   Jacqueline Drolow

-   Janet Brown

-   a boy called Francis.

Italian names also come to mind.

Someone in the class shared a birthday with me, October 30.

Suzanne Denny, near Yateley, Hampshire, England:  July 29, 2013

 

Recollections

28.

Stan Urbaniak

Edinburgh

Thank you to Stan Urbaniak who read Suzanne Denny's comments above and posted a message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Stan wrote:

Mother Martina

"Suzanne Denny's comments re Mother Martina at brought back memories.

I attended St. Margaret's from 1953 to 1955, aged 5, and well remember a very young Mother Martina.  She was a lovely person."

Stan Urbaniak, Edinburgh:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook,  August 13, 2013

 

Recollections

29.

Avril Lamb (nee Capaldi)

Edinburgh

Thank you to Avril Lamb (nee Capaldi) who wrote:

1961-72

"I attended the St Margaret's Convent  from 1960 to 1972.

Pupils

"I  remember many of the names mentioned above:

-  Rebecca Murgatroyd was my friend at school.  We went to the same ballet school for years.

-  Janice Vissenga was a very talented artist.  We were on stage together as part of a comedy duo.

-  Danuta Bizio was my best when I was a teenager.

-  Heather Macintyre is another girl that I remember.

Other Memories

"I also remember:

-  the names of many of the nuns that have been mentioned previously.

-   I was in the House 'Gillies' .  It had the blue badge.

-  the grounds were very pretty, as I recall

-  I received my First Communion in the chapel

-  I spent 11 years of my life at St Margaret's, so have lots of memories from that time, long ago

Best Wishes

I pass on my best wishes to the people I remember.

Avril Lamb (nee Capaldi), Edinburgh:  August 24, 2013

 

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EdinPhoto - Home Page      Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.      At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.            At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photogrpahers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.  Details of who owns the copyright of photographs and other mateiral on this web site.

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Frequently Asked Questions

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LINKS:  All underlined words and pictures on this site are links.  Please click on any of them..