Edinburgh Waterfront

Gas Holder

Removal by controlled explosion

Explosion!

Edinburgh Waterfront  -  Demolition of one of the gasometers by controlled explosion  -  15 August 2004  -  The explosion!

  peter.stubbs@edinphoto.org.uk                                                                                                          Photograph taken  15 August 2004

Falling!

Edinburgh Waterfront  -  Demolition of one of the gasometers by controlled explosion  -  15 August 2004  -  Falling!

  peter.stubbs@edinphoto.org.uk                                                                                                          Photograph taken  15 August 2004

Gone!

Edinburgh Waterfront  -  Demolition of one of the gasometers by controlled explosion  -  15 August 2004  -  10 seconds after the explosion

  peter.stubbs@edinphoto.org.uk                                                                                                               Photograph taken  15 August 2004

Gas Holder

Removal by controlled explosion

The Explosion

The explosion can be seen at the base of the gas holder on both sides in the top photo.  The gas holder, 250t-high and weighing 1,200 tonnes, fell to the south, away from the camera, and was gone within about five seconds.

The gas holder might have been demolished earlier in the year,  but for the fact that peregrine falcons were found to be nesting in the vicinity.  The demolition was delayed until the young birds had left the nest.

Demolition of the gas holder will enable the developer, SecondSite, to proceed with development of their site.  Napier University's new buildings are already under construction on the southern edge of the site.

 

Granton Gas Works

Background

Here are a few facts that I was told by Tom Ward (Scottish Gas, now retired) and others present to view the demolition:

- Construction of the gas works at Granton began in 1898 on a 106.5 acre site purchased from the Duke of Buccleuch for 124,000.

-  The one remaining gas holder (known as gas holder No 1) operated for a hundred years, from 1902 to 2002.  (When the gas holder was in use, the central storage drum, just visible in the photo below at ground level, would rise above the ground within the metal framework.)

Edinburgh Waterfront  -  debris on the ground following controlled explosion on 15 August 2004

The remains

- Work commenced on erecting the second and third gas holders, on either side of No 1, in 1928 and 1967.

- Granton Gas Works continued to make town gas until 1976 when conversion to natural gas for the district was complete.

- There are now 17 gas holders still in use in Scotland.  These gas holders (or gas holders) store gas that is surplus to requirements during periods when there is low demand for gas and allow it to be released when consumer demand is high.

-  There are another 17 gas holders no longer in use in Scotland.

- Granton Gas Works had three engines, numbered 1, 2 and 3 in the order that they were delivered.  One of these has been preserved by the Museum of Scotland.

 

 

 

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