Links to Other Pages

EdinPhoto - Home Page      Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.      At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.            At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photogrpahers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.  Details of who owns the copyright of photographs and other mateiral on this web site.

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

Recollections

Central Edinburgh Shops

  

Recollections

1.

Valerie Mills
Luss, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

-  Gows

-  The Coop Bakery

-  Patrick Thomson's

-  J & R Allen's

2.

Val Turner
Australia

-  Edinburgh Shops

-  Edinburgh Castle

-  Christmas Tree

3.

Phil Wilson
Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

-  Roderick Tweedie

4.

Lin Pender née Waugh
née Letham

Eindhoven, Netherlands

-  Family

-  Veitch

-  Goldburg's

5.

James A Rafferty
Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

-  Willie Layden's

6.

Sandra Thomson
near Edinburgh

-  Goldberg's

7.

G M Rigg
New Zealand

-  Valvona & Crolla

Meiklejohn's

-  Local Coop

-  Bread Street

-  The Bridges

-  Princes Street

8.

Lynda Maine
Edinburgh

-  Princes Street

9.

Lynda Maine
Edinburgh

-  Princes Street

-  Queensferry Street

-  Hanover Street

10.

Lynda Maine
Edinburgh

-  Bread Street

11.

Bob Wilson
Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

-  Book Shop near the Royal Mile

-  Well-dressed

12.

G M Rigg
New Zealand

-  Near East End of Princes Street

-  Between Princes St and Bus Station

13.

G M Rigg
New Zealand

-  PTs and John Lewis

-  Bairds

-  Sparks and The School Exchange

14.

Danny Callaghan
Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

-  John Lewis

-  Parker's

15.

Mal Acton
Liverpool, Lancashire, England

with reply from

Peter Stubbs
Edinburgh

-  Mackie's, Princes Street

16.

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

-  Mackie's

-  Greensmith Downes

-  Milk Bar

-  MacVitties

-  Binns

-  Half-Day Closing

-  Aitken & Niven

-  Woolworths

17.

Bob Sinclair
Queensland, Australia

-  Waverley Steps

-  McColl's

-  Fifty Shilling Tailors

-  Forsyths

-  Purves

-  Thomas Cook

-  Methven Simpson

-  Marcus Furs

-  W J Mackie & Sons

-  Timpson's

-  Saxone

-  Fuller's

-  Darling & Co

-  Ferguson's

18.

Betty Wallace
(
née Baxter)
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

-  C&A Modes

19.

Betty Wallace
(
née Baxter)
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

-  Patrick Thomson's

-  Smalls

20.

John Clark
Newcastle, Ontario, Canada

-  Patrick Thomson's

21.

Betty Wallace
(
née Baxter)

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

-  Smalls

22.

Susan Cameron

-  Law & Forest

23.

Moira Clarke
Stokesley, North Yorkshire, England

+ replies from:

Tony Ivanov
Bo'ness, West Lothian, Scotland

and

Bob Henderson
Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

and

Ray Graham
Billingham, County Durham, England

-  Parker's Wool Shop

24.

GM Rigg
New Zealand

-  Grocers

-  Fruit Merchants

25.

Lynda Maine
Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

-  Jamieson's Fruit Merchants

26.

Avril Finlayson Smith
Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

-  Patrick Thomson's

-  The West End

-  Tollcross

27.

Stephen McMahon
Munich, Germany

-  Rankin's Fruit Merchants

-  Princes Street Fruit Merchants

28.

Bryan Gourlay
Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

-  Patrick Thomson's

-  Great Aunt Aggie

- The Laundry

-  Aggie

29.

GM Rigg
New Zealand

-  Jamieson's and Rankins'

-  Sweetie Shop

-  Leith Street

30.

Trisha McDonald
Livingston / Portobello, Scotland

-  Rankins'

-  Rankins' and Jamieson's

31.

Margaret Goodchild
Welwyn, Hertfordshire, England

-  Rankins'

32.

Margaret Goodchild
Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

-  Rankins'

33.

Paula
Ohio, USA

World War II - Princes Street Bakery

34.

Norman O'Donnell

-  Jamieson's

35.

David Mitchell

-  Law & Forest

-  Late 1960s

-  Meat Paste

-  The Manager

-  Bacon Slicer

-  Today

36.

Brian Johnstone
Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland

-  Shops at Christmas

-  Binns

-  Patrick Thomson's

-  Jenners

37.

Allan

Clark's Shoe Shop

38.

Tony Ivanov
Bo'ness, West Lothian, Scotland

-  Jenners

Clark's Shoe Shop

39.

GM Rigg
New Zealand

Clark's Shoe Shop

-  Jenners

-  John Menzies

40.

June Sutherland
Oxfordshire, England

-  Etam

-  Patrick Thomson

-  Darlings

41.

Margaret Cooper
London, England

-  Dolls' Hospital

42.

Rosemary Shariff (née Craig)
London, England

-  Dolls' Hospital

43.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

-  Valvona & Crolla

44.

Allan Watson
Edinburgh

-  Shops on The Bridges

45.

Winnie Lisowski
Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland

-  Dofos Pet Shop

46.

June Robertson Wood
Arroyo Grande, Central Coast, California, USA

-  Chemists' Shops

47.

Betty Hepburn (née Boland)
Waikanae, Kapiti Coast, New Zealand

-  Chemists' Shops

48.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

-  Chemists' Shops

-  Canonmills Chemist

49.

Connie Newman
East Peckham, Kent, England

Chemists' Shops

-  Internet Article

My Dad's Shop

50.

Mal Acton
Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Drumsheugh Gardens

Dean Village

51.

John Hughes

Bread Street Co-op

52.

Donald Grant
Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland

Filming: St Cuthbert's Co-op at
Bread Street

-  Actors

-  Extras

53.

Alexander Hay
France

John Knox House

-  Tartan Shop

-  Antique Shop

54.

Maggie Shearer

Bisto Street

-  Grocers:  Shearer's

55.

Terry Cox
Fairmilehead, Edinburgh

Bisto Street

-  Grocers

Lauriston Place

-  Sunday School

56.

Jim Suddon
Morningside, Edinburgh

Jamieson's Fruit Shop

RW Forsyth

57.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

-  Valvona & Crolla

58.

Lyndsay (formerly Linda) Montgomery
Old Town, Edinburgh

-  Shopping with Mum

-  Parker's Store

 

Recollections

1.

Valerie Mills

Luss, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

Thank you to Valerie Mills who wrote:

Edinburgh Shops

"I left Edinburgh 5 yrs ago.  I now live 1 mile outside the village of Luss, on the Banks of Loch Lomond.

Even before I left Edinburgh, and all the shops had changed from the days of my childhood, I still got immense pleasure walking down Leith Walk and 'remembering'.

I remember:

 Gows on the 'Walk' for my school tie and blouse.

The Co-op Bakery at the end of Hermitage Park, that still used red hand carts for the Milk Boys.

-  Patrick Thomsons, up the Bridges, where you got your hair cut, and you didn't sit on a chair.  It was a 'carousel horse'.

 J and R Allens further up, on the end of Chambers St.

Valerie Mills, Luss, Argyll & Bute, Scotland:  October 14 2007

 

Recollections

2.

Val Turner

Australia

Val Turner used to live at Colinton and visit the shops and other attractions in the centre of Edinburgh, before emigrating to Australia.

Val writes:

Edinburgh Shops

"I  remember:

Lipton's, I think, round the corner from Tollcross. They had lovely black and white tiles on the floor which I loved (and the bacon slicer and cheese cutter.

- Crawfords on Princes Street.  We'd watch the Scottish dancing in Princes Street Gardens on Saturday mornings and go to Crawfords for tea in for afternoon.  It was served by waitresses in frilly white aprons and have delicious cream trifle little cakes in choc. cups.

- all the little shops on the Royal Mile and John Knox's house with the little steps going up and the turret windows. I always recognize Scottish architecture by the round turrets."

Edinburgh Castle

"Sometimes, we'd go into the Castle.  I remember one room with the Castle Rock growing through the floor!! it was polished black, as I remember, but no one else remembers it  -  just me, so perhaps it was not really there."

Christmas Tree

"I remember the enormous Christmas tree on the Mound that Norway sent us each year. so they still do that?"

The Norwegians still provide the tree, but there have been problems transporting it from Norway for the past three years. So the latest tree (Christmas 2007) came  from the Scottish Borders, but the Norwegians still paid for it!                                                                                                              -  Peter Stubbs

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  January12, 2008.

 

Recollections

3.

Phil Wilson

Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you to Phil Wilson who wrote:

Roderick Tweedie

"I  delivered parcels of quality clothing as a teenager in the 60s from the 'Roderick Tweedie' shop on George Street's southern side.

This sometimes involved long bus trips to large houses on Edinburgh's Southside, as the shop in general catered to a rather up-market clientele."

Phil Wilson, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland:  August 1, 2006

 

Recollections

4.

Lin Pender née Waugh née Letham

Eindhoven, Netherlands

Thank you to Lin Pender who wrote:

Family

"I lived in Brown Street, Dumbiedykes, and moved to Firhill when I was 14.  My mother and father were Frances and David Letham and my sister was Valerie Letham.  I was Linda Anne Letham back then.

I went to Drummond Street School in 1952, then went on to the South Bridge School and James Clark Schools."

Shops

Veitch

Causewayside

"I remember Veitch's shop in the Causewayside.  I loved the sugar mice.

Goldberg's

Tollcross

Goldberg's Department Store,  High Riggs,  Tollcross, Edinburgh ©

I worked in shoe shops when I left the school.  Then, I worked in Goldbergs when it first opened.  It was wonderful not having to work on a Saturday.

It was such a glamorous job in these days, and I counted myself lucky to have secured a job there.  I worked in the ladies shoe department and then in young fashion.

Before you served a customer you had to check your smile in a wee mirror they supplied you with.

You could not call your customers dear or hen, it had to be madam and sir.  I ended up working in the office on the accounting machines with my friend Marlene.

I'd like to hear from anyone who remembers me."

Lin Pender, Eindhoven, Netherlands:  July 16, 2008

Contacting Linda

If you'd like to contact Linda, please email me and I'll pass on your message to her.

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  July 16, 2008

 

Recollections

5.

James A Rafferty

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

James A Rafferty wrote:

QUESTION

Willie Layden's Shop

"Can any of your readers help?  I was brought up in the High Street, and on a Sunday morning we were sent to Willie Layden's for the rolls .

I think it was on the right-side as you go down the street, but others say it was on the left,.  Can anyone remember?"

James A Rafferty, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  July 29, 2008

ANSWER

Willie Layden's Shop

I've checked my old copies of the Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directories.  All four (1930-31, 1940-41, 1950-51 and 1961-62.)

Each of these directories lists just one William Layden.  His address, each time, is given as 18 Blackfriars Street

Blackfriars Street is on the right as you go down the High Street, just  below the junction with North Bridge.

Blackfriars Street - 1961

   Photograph taken by Charles W Cushman in 1961 -  Blackfriars Street, Edinburgh Old Town ©

Peter Stubbs:  July 29, 2008

 

Recollections

6.

Sandra Thomson

near Edinburgh

Sandra Thomson wrote:

Goldberg's

Tollcross

Goldberg's Department Store,  High Riggs,  Tollcross, Edinburgh ©

"Thank you for the recollections of Goldbergs. I live just outside Edinburgh and a visit to Goldberg's (usually for a new winter coat) was a highlight of the year in the 1960s.

Mother and  I would have lunch in the Caféteria on the top floor, and we would visit the caged animals on the terrace. It was the height of elegance for a seven year old child!"

Sandra Thomson, near Edinburgh:  December 27, 2008

 

Recollections

7.

G M Rigg

New Zealand

G M Rigg wrote:

"Our local shops were:

Valvona & Crolla

Here, we bought a smoked pork sausage called dashra (dodgy spelling) to take to my very grateful l granny in Harthill every couple of weeks or so.

There was another Deli just off Broughton Street, on the left hand side going down, can't recall the name.

Meiklejohn's

This was opposite St Mary's Cathedral.  There is now a roundabout where the shop used to be.  This is where Ma bought:

Ayrshire bacon (sliced on one of those big hand-turned machines)

unsalted butter from a large block (put into blocks with those wee wooden butter pats then wrapped in paper)

Lipton's teas.

Our Local Co-op

Our local Co-op in Picardy Place, where the Sherlock Holmes statue is now, but we didn't use it much.  Can you remember your number ?  Ours was 67993,  and my friend Rose McKenzie's, who shopped for her sick mum, was 96916.

Bread Street

The Bread Street Co-op was where we collected our divi or dividend money.

The big dry goods shop in Bread Street was also one of my mother's main shops.  I  can't recall the name of it.

The Bridges

Patrick Thomson's (PT's to us) a favourite place to buy fabric.

Grants (opposite PT's, above the Scotsman office) was where everyone rented their first telly.  Ours was rented for a big football match but I remember watching 'The Lone Ranger', 'Watch With Mother' and 'Andy Pandy' !

J & R Allen's was good for rotisery chicken - a big treat, they had a Café called The Gay Tray !!!

Princes Street

Forsyth's & Jenners were only used at Christmas time for special things.

Melrose's always had that great smell of coffee.

Their tea drying & blending factory was behind our house, sandwiched between York Place & St James' Place.

G M Rigg, New Zealand,
 message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  January 22, 2009

 

Recollections

8.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Lynda Maine wrote:

Princes Street

"The shops in Princes Street that I can remember are:

-  Darlings, where I bought a lovely dress

-  Smalls

-  Binns, now House of Fraser

-  C & A.  I used to call it 'Charlotte and Ann'.

I wonder if anyone else remembers other shops in Princess Street.  I can remember half the street closing on a Wednesday afternoon, and all the rest closed on a Saturday Afternoon.

I can also remember:

 Mackies Tea Rooms

-   McVitties at the West End

-  Greens the hairdresser at the corner of Castle Street, and Princess Street.  I was told if you went to Greens to get your hair done. you were well off."

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh, message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  February 8, 2009

 

Recollections

9.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Thank you to Lynda Maine who added:

"Now, I've remembered more shops in the centre of Edinburgh.

There were:

Princes Street

 Thornton's sport shop.  It was at the corner of Hanover Street and Princess Street

Jamieson high class fruit shop. I think it was near the Jacey's the cinema

Rankins the fruiterer near Thornton's

-  Richard Shops opposite Thornton's, corner of Hanover Street, Princess Street,

Queensferry Street

-  Rae Macintosh who sold sheet music and musical instruments.  They went to Queensferry Street and the West End .

Hanover Street

-  Crawford's, the bakers in Hanover Street.  I remember when the Edinburgh International Festival was on, they sold bread in the shape of a Thistle."

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh:  February 9, 2009

 

Recollections

10.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Thank you to Lynda Maine who later wrote::

Bread Street

"G. M. Rigg (7 above) could not recall the name of a big dry goods shop in Bread Street.

I wonder if it was Thompson's, a very old family firm.  They were at West Port, Edinburgh. They were a terrific firm.  They closed many years ago. they sold quite a lot of things. I went with my mother most Saturday afternoons

I can remember the owner cutting up Marzipan. The assistants got everything out of drawers at the back of the counter or from sacks,if my memory serves me right.   They also sold budgie seed and other things at the other side of the shop.

I also remember the lino shop in Bread Street. the lino came from Kirkcaldy.

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh:  February 23, 2009

 

Recollections

11.

Bob Wilson

Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Bob Wilson for posting a message in the Edinphoto guestbook.

Bob wrote

Book Shop near the Royal Mile

"Does anyone remember the shop in a side street somewhere near the Royal Mile, that sold books from galvanized dustbins?  They stood on the pavement outside his shop.

It was a street full off antique shops, with the odd book shop,  including this one.

I owe this unknown bookseller a great debt.  Through his 6d books, I educated myself.  I can remember he would give me 2 books for 'a tanner' and because of him I became an avid bookworm of a reader."

Bob Added:

Well-dressed

"My overriding memory of Edinburgh in the 1940s is how well-dressed and prosperous everyone appeared.

I think it was the heavy tweed coats and hats which women wore in those days that set the right tone, and the good suits that the men wore."

Bob Wilson, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book, April 23, 2009

 

  Recollections

12.

G M Rigg

New Zealand

Thank you to G M Rigg, who wrote message 7 above,  for leaving another message in the EdinPhoto guest book.

G M Rigg wrote:

Near the East End of Princes Street

"These are the Princes Street shops that I remember, from Register House to the corner of St Andrews Square area.

Woolworths

"Woolworths was just plain 'Woolies' to us.  I remember:

a bag of lemonade powder, various flavours.  Just lick your finger, dip it in, then give a good sook.  I loved it as a kid, even if your fingers turned funny colours afterwards.

-  the wonderful smell of the roasted, salted nuts bagged up, piping hot.  Not that we could afford to buy a bag. 

-  buying a big bag of assorted broken biscuits for a penny.  Picnic time."

John Menzies

"John Menzies, or Menzies as it was called:

I can clearly remember seeing, and lusting after:

-   the James bond car (with ejector seat)

-  the Man from UNCLE car (with Illya & Napoleon alternately shooting from the open windows when you pressed a button on the top)

-  the Avengers cars (one each for Emma Peel & Steed).  Not a girlie toy but I still wanted them.

Swoppits were great, you could choose from Cowboys, Indians or Knights. They came on foot or on horse-back. All their little bits popped off so that you could swap them around & customise your model.

My brothers got a couple each for Christmas once but I got the Britains animals.  The Britains range had all the zoo or farm animals you can think ofI remember getting an African elephant that had swivel ears & removable tusks."

Dunn & Co

"Dunn & Co, the tailors sold all older men's stuff. like suits and cardigans."

Between Princes Street and Bus Station

Milk Bar

"The Milk Bar was just around the corner from Princes Street, towards the bus station, past a fruit & veg shop (I think)."

Lane behind Woolies

"A little further up South St Andrew Street, turning right would take you to the lane behind Woolies, past The Café Royal and back to Register House.

I had a school friend (I can't recall the family name now) who lived with her parents and sisterShe was the double of Kathy Kirby!

She lived in a flat whose entrance was directly opposite the back door of Woolies, it had a spiral staircase up to the front door -  I've loved spiral staircases ever since playing there."

Shops and Vending Machines

"Also in the same area, between St James' Square & Swinton Row there were a few little shops that served the bus station and locals alike

There were also a few vending machines, one dispensed chilled flavoured milk (chocolate, strawberry or plain), quite a few different cigarette machines and gum machines too.

There was a newsagent, a sweet/grocer-type shop and there was a dismal little Café opposite, attached to the bus station."

G M Rigg, New Zealand,
 message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  June 4, 2009

 

  Recollections

13.

G M Rigg

New Zealand

Thank you to G M Rigg who wrote:

School Necessities

"Around 1959/60, everyone I knew got their school necessities from the same shops:

PTs or John Lewis for the girls' fabric and patterns for sewing pinafores and dresses

Bairds  for shoes.  These were:

- Start Right sandals (usually brown) for the summer

- Clarkes shoes (usually black) for the winter.

 Sparks or The School Exchange for  components of school uniform.  If you had any items in good condition, The School Exchange would exchange them for similar articles in the bigger sizes at minimal cost.  It was mostly girls' clothing that was exchanged, as the boys wore theirs out too quickly.  Boys didn't grow out of clothing often !!!

4. Then when all was assembled of you went decked out in the uniform to Jeromes to have your photograph taken for your grandmother."

G M Rigg, New Zealand:  Message posted in EdinPhoto web site:  October 29, 2009

  Recollections

14.

Danny Callaghan

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Thank you to Danny Callaghan who read G M Rigg's comments (Recollections 13) and replied:

John Lewis

"GM Rigg mentions John Lewis 1959/60.  At that time, it was 'The Silk Shop' in Fredrick Street.  It was part of the John Lewis group but closed after moving into the John Lewis shop in 1973."

Parker's

"I remember my school uniforms coming from Clan House and also from Parker's Store at Bristo, where  the University's ugly buildings are. 

Parker's ran some sort of shopping club.    It was probably one of Edinburgh's most iconic shops.  It had a mock-Tudor frontage."

Danny Callaghan, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  November 4, 2009

  Recollections

15.

Mal Acton

Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Malcolm Acton posted this message in the EdinPhoto guest book:

Questions

Mackie's

"I wonder if anyone remembers a Marie McDonald who lived in Belford Road and worked at Mackies on Princes Street in the 1960s

She used to decorate all kinds of cakes for any occasion.  Once, in 1967, I called into the shop in my RAF uniform on a visit to surprise her!  I can still see her face now!

What happened to that shop?  And can anyone tell me where (exactly) it was?"

Mal Acton, Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  November 16, 2009

Reply?

If you'd like to send a reply to Malcolm, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to him.  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs:  November 17, 2009

 

Recollections

15.

Answer

1.

Peter Stubbs

Edinburgh

Location

J W Mackie & Sons Ltd, Bakers and Confectioners, were at No 108 Princes Street, about mid-way between Frederick Street and Castle Street, in 1961.  

The shop was described as:

 "Purveyors of Rusks and Shortbread to The late King George V" !

[Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directory, 1961-62]

Closed - 1960s

By 1970, J E Mackie & Sons were no longer in Princes Street.

These are the shops nearby that the trade directories listed:

No

1961-62

1970-71

105-106

Smalls
Drapers & Furnishers

Smalls
Drapers & Furnishers

107

[No occupant listed]

[No occupant listed]

108

J W Mackie & Sons

[No occupant listed]

109:

William Timpson
Boot & Shoe Makers

William Timpson
Boot & Shoe Makers

Peter Stubbs:  November 17, 2009

Source:  Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directories:  1961-62 and 1970-71

  Recollections

16.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair who wrote:

Mackie's

"For any of you correspondents who have links to Mackies - my mother worked there.  She worked mainly in the Buttery but also, in the summertime,  in the first floor Tea Rooms.

The manager, in my mother's time, was Mr Taylor who I believe went to Bonar Bridge.

The waitresses had a name for a customer who left no tip  - he or she was known as a stiff). T

As a youngster, I was allowed to visit on a few occasions and got to know Miss Goodall, the overseer in the Buttery and chef Fred Vert.

My wife and I would quite often go into the ground floor Caféteria on a Sunday, after spending the money we didn't have on imaginary purchases in the Princess Street shops.

Greensmith Downes

"My wife worked in Greensmith Downes, a fashion shop which was nearer to the West End than Mackies.  The place looked nice but some of the conditions downstairs were not all that flash, even if they did have buyers who went to Paris."

Milk Bar

"One of our other favourites was the Milk Bar at the beginning of Shandwick Place.  It was nice to sit and look out the window while indulging in a strawberry or other flavoured shake.  Often it was after another big spending spree or going round the Museum in Chambers Street."

MacVities

"Our other port of call to spend our hard-earned was in MacVitties which bordered Princess Street.

Again, the entertainment was the other customers and the passing traffic."

Binns

"Binns was where most of the kids that I knew went for sports equipment.  I know that, over time, I bought a cricket ball, a football and a tennis racket there. I could not afford the heavier ones and as a result only used it for practice.  Some of the more affluent went to Thornton's.

Half-Day Closing

"One thing about the Princes Street shops that confused some of the visitors to Edinburgh was that the various types of shop or trade had half-day holidays on different days.  I think even some of the Edinburgh residents had a bit of trouble with that."

Aitken & Niven

"Not strictly on Princess Street, but diagonally opposite Binns, was Aitken and Niven.  They were outfitters to a lot of the schools in Edinburgh but, as my wife informed me,not to Leith Academy whose school uniforms were sourced from from the Provvy - Leith Provident."

Woolworths

"Woolworths was the Mecca when looking for something cheap.  Even on limited means, you could find something to buy.

Even if you couldn't, you could drool over many things.   When I was slightly older, I did have a meal in the upstairs Caféteria and, for the money, it was fine."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  November 27, 2009

  Recollections

17.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for sending me more of his memories of  Princes Street.  In his notes below, Bob travelled along the street from east to west.

Bob wrote:

Waverley Steps

"Across the road from Woolies, at the east end of Princes Street,  were stairs going down the side of the NB Hotel to the Waverly Station.  It was a bit of a game to lean into the wind at an angle of 45 degrees to see if you could go down the steps.

The people coming up the steps were considered at a danger of being blown onto Princes Street so they erected a barrier just opposite the steps."

McColls

"McColls was a news agency which carried a wide range of newspapers - probably because it was near the railway station and bus terminus."

Fifty Shilling Tailors

"This was next to the Royal British Hotel ('The RB'), a bit of a class hotel.  Possibly, you could get a suit for £2 9s 11d from the Fifty Shilling Tailors.  I considered buying one from them, but they were a bit of an unknown quantity."

Forsyths

"Forsyths of Edinburgh were reckoned to be one of the better Gents' Outfitters in Edinburgh.  They were the type of shop that had nice drawers which slid out with neatly pressed shirts or socks inside, and said, 'This is quality.' 

R W Forsyth was further along Princes Street, on the opposite side of South St Andrew Street.  It was a respectable Gents' and Boys' Outfitters."

Purves

"Purves was a tobacconist.  As a young lad I was always entranced by the smell from the place and fascinated to see the men coming out with baccy for their pipes.

Other tobacconists in Princes Street were Harris, John Sinclair and John Cotton.

Thomas Cook

"This was a company which would book you a tour to just about anywhere - a Cook's Tour.  This was often used in Edinburgh slang in a cynical way to describe a quick whistle-stop tour."

Methven Simpson

"Methven Simpson were at No 83.  They sold pianos, sheet music and radios, and were well frequented by music lovers.

They were next door to The New Club (at No 85) where my  mother did the odd function as a waitress, being sent there by Mackies"

Marcus Furs

"Marcus Furs were at No 97.  They were a quality furrier who had atop their building, a full-sized bear, an Edinburgh landmark"

WJ Mackie & Sons

"They were Bakers and Confectioners.  They were at No 108.  This is where my mum worked, both in the Buttery (downstairs) and in the first floor Tearooms which overlooked Princes Street Gardens and bandstand.

Thy were extremely popular in the summer time, and when the Edinburgh Festival was on.  They also had a ground floor Caféteria which was well patronised on a Sunday by shop window lookers.

They had orders for their shortbread from all round the world

Timpson's

"This was a good shoe shop.  If you got your shoes from there you were reckoned to be fairly respectable.  In the same building was the Scottish Liberal Club."

Saxone

"This is where I used to eye up the Gents' shoes in the window, at £6 19s 6d."

Fuller's

"Confectioners.  As I remember it, they had a nice little shop with a good range of chocolates.  In the same building was Barries the photographers."

Darling & Co

"A well established Ladies' Outfitters.  As I remember, it was owned by Sir William Darling, who was an MP"

Ferguson's

"Confectioners who I think were responsible for the soft coloured Edinburgh Rock. Later, as I remember it, they moved further along to near the foot of the Mound."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  December 10+11, 2009

  Recollections

18.

Betty Wallace (née Baxter)

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to Betty Wallace (née Baxter) who wrote:

C&A Modes

"The recollections of Princes Street shops on the EdinPhoto web site took me back 64 years. That was when I started working in C&A Modes and I met my best and lifelong friend.

We were both 14 then, and we were called Juniors.  Our supervisor was a tyrant ,but we didn't care.

My husband and I came to Canada in 1967, but we go back to Edinburg often to visit our friend.

I was sorry to see that C&As is no more, but I still have my memories.  I wonder if any old workmates might see this and remember me, Betty Baxter and my friend Connie Steed (our maiden names)."

Betty Baxter, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

C&A Modes

If you'd like to send a reply to Betty, please email me, than I'll pass on your message to her.  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs:  January 17, 2010

  Recollections

19.

Betty Wallace (née Baxter)

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to Betty Wallace (née Baxter) who wrote:

Patrick Thomson's

"Later on I worked in Patrick Thomson's, for the Orient Jewel Co of London.  Does anyone remember the Quartette who entertained the diners during lunch and high tea?"

Televisions

"Patrick Thomsons placed TV sets on the main floors so that the public could come in and watch the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.  Crawfords did likewise for the staff.

Few families had TVs then, but my father-in-law bought one the day before the big day, so that we could watch the wonderful celebration.

I believe that he purchased it from the Clydesdale store in Great Junction Street, Leith.  Unfortunately, we lost the 'vertical lock'.  None of us knew how to make the adjustment, so we watched the whole ceremony, as it burled and burled and burled!"

Smalls

"I also worked for the OJ Co in Smalls of Princes Street.  I will never forget the store manager who stood at the front of the store in his immaculate black jacket and pinstripe trousers greeting customers and directing them to their required department and saying 'Forward One'."  ***

Betty Wallace (née Baxter), Hamilton, Ontario, Canada:  January 18+23, 2010

***  Please also see Recollections 21 for an explanation of this comments.

  Recollections

20.

John Clark

Newcastle, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to John Clark who wrote:

Patrick Thomson's

"I started in Patrick Thomsons as an apprentice electrician in 1955.  It was the greatest job I ever had to this day.  I was young, energetic, full of the bloom of youth, and I was working among 300 0r 400 young girls.  Now tell me that is not a dream job! 

But best of all, I set my eyes on this gorgeous young girl, Betty Curran, from Loanhead. (The Curran family was well known in Loanhead in the 1950s and 1960s.)

Betty was a talented seamstress / dressmaker who had started her apprenticeship with the elite, in Jenners, sometimes helping out with the royal dresses.  She had black curly hair and could have doubled for Liz Taylor.  She was a stunner.

She was two-and-a-half years older than me (a big difference at 17) but I persisted, got a date, became engaged, was married, and here we are, 4 kids later and we've just celebrated our 50th wedding anniversary last week.  I'm so blessed, to have my wife, and to have worked in PT's."

50th Wedding Anniversary

    John and Betty Clark  -  50th Wedding Anniversary ©

John and Betty

"It would be nice to hear from any of the PT's family - and we were a family  -  if anybody remembers me (John Clark) and my wife Betty (formerly Betty Curran). 

I don't think there will be too many people who will remember us now.  After all, I was pretty young at the time and I'm 73 now."

John Clark, Newcastle, Ontario, Canada:  January 18+19, 2010

Message for John Clark?

If you'd like to send a message to John Clark, please email me, then I'll forward your message to him.  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs: January 19, 2010

  Recollections

21.

Betty Wallace (née Baxter)

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

I asked Betty Wallace for an explanation of her comment in Recollections 19 when she spoke of the store manager

"greeting customers and directing them to their required department and saying 'Forward One'."

I found Betty's answer interesting.

Betty wrote:

'Forward One'

Smalls

"My memories were from a long time ago, when customers were treated like the aristocracy.  Every Department Store had their 'First Sales Assistant' or 'Number One.

He or she was always given the first opportunity to wait on a prospective customer, and must always be occupied with one before the other assistants.   Hence the saying 'Forward One'."

C&A

"The supervisors in C&A were also renowned for using this expression whenever a customer appeared."

Betty Wallace (née Baxter), Hamilton, Ontario, Canada:  January 23, 2010

  Recollections

22.

Sue Cameron

Manchester, Lancashire, England

Thank you to Sue Cameron who wrote:

Law & Forest

"Does anyone remember Law and Forest? 

They were an upmarket grocers in Queensferry Street.  I think there's an antique shop there now.

I used to sit on a bentwood chair with my mother awaiting her order, and old Mr Forest always used to give me a chocolate biscuit.

There were dozens of  brass handled spice drawers lining the wall behind the counter - the smell was wonderful.

Just opposite, across the road, was a fantastic fishmonger. Then, we could complete our shopping at Rankins,  on the corner, for fruit and vegetables,"

Sue Cameron, Manchester, Lancashire, England:  April 5, 2010

 

  Recollections

23.

Moira Clarke

Stokesley, North Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Moira Clarke who wrote:

Parker's Wool Shop

"I wondered if anyone remembers Parker's wool shop. I come from a family where everyone knitted, and I remember spending hours and hours, as a child in the that shop, bored stiff, whilst the women chose their next lot of wool!

 I can't actually remember where Parker's stood though.  Was it up the Bridges somewhere?"

Moira Clarke, Stokesley, North Yorkshire, England:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  April 8, 2010

 

Recollections

23.

Reply
 1.

Tony Ivanov

Bo'ness, West Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to Moira Clarke who wrote:

Parker's Wool Shop

"Moira Clarke was asking about Parker's Wool Shop around The Bridges area.  I remember a double-fronted shop which sold wool in the High Street, just down from the Bridges which may have been Parkers."

Tony Ivanov, Bo'ness West Lothian, Scotland:  April 9, 2010

 

Recollections

23.

Reply
 2.

Bob Henderson

Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Henderson who wrote:

Parker's Wool Store

"Parkers wool store was a part of Parkers stores, housed in the Mock Tudor building at Bristo.

The wool store, if memory serves me right, had its own entrance in the middle of the building but you could also gain access to other parts of the store from there.

It always seemed to me, at the time, as if it was a few little shops which had been connected by opening corridors between them."

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  April 9, 2010

 

Recollections

23.

Reply
 3.

Ray Graham

Billingham, County Durham, England

Thank you to Ray Graham who replied to Moira Clarke's request for a photograph of Parker's.  I've sent an email to Moira to let her know about Ray's message below.

Ray wrote:

Parker's Store

"Hi Moira:

I was born in 1953 in Edinburgh , brought up in the old Dumbiedykes, then Buccleuch Street.  I read you were looking for images of Parker's store.

Well, whilst I was up in Edinburgh burying my father, 5 years ago, I bought a print of Parker's where I remember as a boy shopping with my mum.

I still have that print hanging on the wall.  The good news is I live in Billingham now, so if you would like to communicate please get in touch."

Ray Graham, Billingham, County Durham, England:  December 8, 2013

  Recollections

24.

GM Rigg

New Zealand

Thank you to GM Rigg for posting this message in the EdinPhoto guest book.

Grocers

"I remember Law & Forrest, the grocer at the west end, but not by name. It was one of the shops that would now be called a gourmet deli or specialist shop.

Fruit Merchants

There was a fruit & vegetable shop on Prices Street. (Again, I can't recall the name.)  It was by appointment to HRH the Queen or Queen Mother. The shop had some exotic stuff in their window that I had never eaten before, like fresh pineapples,  but now would probably be found in supermarkets everywhere.

Forsyth's & Jenner's had the two best grocery departments in Edinburgh where just about anything could be bought.  Such wonderful memories, but you still can't beat Valvona & Crolla!"

GM Rigg, New Zealand:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook:  April 10, 2010

See also Recollections 25, 27 and 29 below.

 

  Recollections

25.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Thank you to Lynda Maine who replied to Recollections 24 above

Lynda wrote:

Jamieson's Fruit Merchants

"GM Rigg asked about the upmarket grocer's shop in Princes Street.  The name of the shop was Jamieson's.  it was practically next door to the old Jacey Cinema.

That's the shop it was the first I first saw yam potatoes, now called sweet potatoes."

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh:  April 11, 2010

 

  Recollections

26.

Avril Finlayson Smith

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Avril Finlayson Smith who replied to Recollections 20 above.

Avril wrote:

Patrick Thomson's

"I'm sure I remember you John Clark (Recollections 20).  I used to work in the Electrical department at Patrick Thomson's, where Mr. Ross was the manager.

I just can't remember the name of the chap who ran the other part upstairs, where the musical stuff was.  He was a tall chap with  blonde hair.

We were downstairs in the basement, but I did the pricing and tax for these departments.  We had to go upstairs to a special room for all this.

Again I cannot recollect the name of the lady in charge up there, but most of the buyers were terrified of her, which was quite funny.  She really was a lovely lady, but very much in charge, so didn't take any nonsense from anyone.

For quite a while my desk used to be situated outside the lift doors, not an ideal place to work.  Eventually Mr. Ross managed to clear a spot for me in his tiny office.

I wonder if John Clark remembers the Window Dresser Alan. He was my brother's Best Man.

The West End

My Dad was one of the Tailors there for over 25 years in Romanes & Paterson's In Princes Street.  My aunt, his sister, was also one there.

I had another aunt who worked in Aitken and Niven at the West End Sadly, these places, and Blyths up Lothian Road, another great store, are all gone.

Tollcross

I used to love going into at Grubers, the Pork Butcher at Tollcross.  It was a real joy.  There was a ,wonderful smell and everything looked good and, what's more, tasted quite delicious, It makes my mouth water to think about it all."

Avril Finlayson Smith, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  April 15, 2010

 

  Recollections

27.

Stephen McMahon

Munich, Germany

Thank you to Stephen McMahon who replied to Recollections 24 above:

Rankins' Fruit Merchants

"The greengrocers was Rankins'. My father worked for the company up until his death in 1972.  I was a Saturday "tattie laddie" (£2.50 a week for 8 hours every Saturday) in various branches  of the chain when I was at school.

The other big (and posh) Rankins'  store as at the West End where Ryan's bar now is. This was the only branch that sold the biggest and more exotic collection of fruit, veg, flowers AND sweets and cigarettes."

Stephen McMahon, Munich, Germany:  April 16, 2010

Princes Street Fruit Merchants

I've checked some of the old Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directories and found that both Jamieson and Rankins had fruit shops in Princes Street in the 1960s:

-  Jamieson's were at No 130 in 1961, next door to Monseigneur News Theatre and had been there since 1903 or probably earlier.

-  Rankins' were at No 80, opposite the floral clock in Princes Street Gardens.  They had several shops in Edinburgh. Their Princes Street shop appears to have opened some time between 1951 and 1961.

Peter Stubbs:  April 16, 2010

See also Recollections 29 below.

  

  Recollections

28.

Bryan Gourlay

Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Thank you to Bryan Gourlay who wrote:

Patrick Thomson's

"It was interesting reading John Clark’s and Avril Finlayson Smith’s recollections of working in Patrick Thomson’s  (Recollections 20 + 26 above).

Great Aunt Aggie

"They may have known my Great Aunt Aggie (Agnes Smith) who worked in Pat’s for well over 30 years.  Nearly everybody had an auntie Aggie

She returned from Canada in 1927 and worked in the laundry in Patrick Thomsons until she retired in the 1960s.  I don’t know what her title was but, when I knew her, she was in charge of the laundry right down in the bowels of the huge building."

As a young boy, I was often taken to see auntie Aggie, following afternoon tea and a spell listening to the genteel music in the tearoom, many floors above."

The Laundry

"The entrance to Patrick Thomson’s laundry was reached by going down steep Carrubber's Close from the High Street to a door near the bottom, just before you reached Market Street.

It was a bit like a journey to the centre of the earth.  Inside, the laundry, it was baking hot with huge washing and ironing machines – probably little changed from when the shop opened around 1900.  I guess they laundered all manner of things from the shop, the restaurant, work clothes, uniforms etc."

Aggie

"Aggie lived in Restalrig and caught the train early each morning from Abbeyhill Station at Smokey Brae, with her friend Violet who worked in the laundry with her, to the Waverley just a short walk from the laundry."

Here is a photo of Aggie in her finery (in the centre) at Portobello with her sister Cissie and brother-in-law Jack.  The photo was probably taken in the early-1950s

Aggie is wearing her obligatory fox fur, of course.  Whatever happened to all those fox furs?"

Stephen McMahon, Munich, Germany:  April 16, 2010

 

  Recollections

29.

GM Rigg

New Zealand

GM Rigg replied to the comments above by posting this message in the EdinPhoto guest book.

Jamieson's and Rankins'

"Thanks to Lynda Maine (25 above) for the name of the posh green grocer, Jamieson's on Princes Street.

Re Rankins': I only remember two branches, the large branch at the West End and the smaller one at the 'clock roundabout' at the top of The Walk.  Neither was considered 'quality' like Jamieson's, Jenner's or Forsyth's.  They were just your average fruit & veggie shops."

Sweetie Shop

"What was the name of the tiny sweetie shop shoehorned in at the top of Greenside (Leith Street) on the corner of East Register Street situated under the Terrace opposite the Millets store?  I hope this description of the location makes sense to someone !"

Leith Street

"I only remember some of the shops on that side of the Leith Street.  There were a couple of tailors' shops & Timothy White's the Chemist.

On the other side of Leith Street, the shops were usually a bit bigger like Jerome's, Curry's at one time, the tea rooms, the ballroom/dance hall, etc.  I love to see the photographs of these shops & streets - such memories."

1950s

Leith Street  -  before the building of the King James Hotel and the St James Shopping Centre ©

1973

Looking down Leith Street, 1973 ©

GM Rigg, New Zealand:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook:  April 19, 2010

 

  Recollections

30.

Trisha McDonald

Livingston / Portobello

Trisha McDonald replied to the comments that GM Rigg posted in the EdinPhoto guest book (Recollections 29 above).

Trisha wrote:

Rankins'

"My mother-in-law worked for Rankins in the shops at the top of Leith Walk and the West End for 35yrs.  She would dispute the comment that the quality of the goods were not up to the standards of anywhere else.  I know there was also a shop in Tollcross."

Trisha McDonald, Livingston / Portobello, Scotland
Reply posted in EdinPhoto guest book, April 20, 2010

Trisha added:

Rankins' and Jamieson's

"I've now spoken to my mum-in-law and told her about the comment regarding the quality of Rankins' goods.

Her reply was Jamieson's was very up-market and was not for the normal working class.

There were Rankins' shops, in Elm Row, Baxter's Place, Home Street and the West End.

Trisha McDonald, Livingston / Portobello, Scotland
Reply posted in EdinPhoto guest book, April 21, 2010

 

  Recollections

31.

Margaret Goodchild

Welwyn, Hertfordshire, England

Trisha McDonald replied to the comments that GM Rigg posted in the EdinPhoto guest book (Recollections 29 above).

Trisha wrote:

Rankins'

"There was a branch of Rankins in Clerk Street in the 1940s and early 1950s. It was just near the corner of Rankeillor Street.

I remember being sent there by my mother when the war ended  as she'd heard they had bananas!  I had to queue up for them and actually had had to ask what they looked like as I was very young when I'd last seen one."

Margaret Goodchild, Welwyn, Hertfordshire, England
Reply posted in EdinPhoto guest book, April 20, 2010

 

  Recollections

32.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Thank you to Lynda Maine for telling me about more branches of Rankins.

Lynda wrote:

Rankins'

"There were Rankins' shops at:

- The West End of Princes Street

-  Tollcross (3 shops)

-  Bruntsfield

-  Newington

-  Deanhaugh, Stockbridge

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh:  April 20, 2010

In view of all the interest in Rankins' shops in Edinburgh, I checked the old trade directories and found:

-  8 Rankins' shops listed in the 1950 directory.

-  16 Rankins' shops listed  in the 1961 and 1970 directories.

The addresses of the shops in 1970 were:

-  9 Baxter's Place

-  37 Constitution Street

-  21 Dalry Road

-  35 Deanhaugh Street

-  61 Earl Grey Street

-  27 Easter Road

-  15 Elm Row

-  7 Great Junction Street

-  50 Home Street (Fruit Dept)

-  54 Home Street (Floral Dept

-  18 Nicolson Street

-  79 Nicolson Street

-  164 Portobello High Street

-  21 St Patrick Square

-  19 South St Andrew Street

-  West End (Fruit + Floral Depts)

Also listed in 1970 were:

-  37 Constitution Street (Fruit Importers)

-  Easter Duddingston (Market Gardens)

-  28-29 Market Street (Registered Office)

-  Meadowbank (Garage)

Peter Stubbs,  Edinburgh:  April 22, 2010

 

  Recollections

33.

Paula

Ohio, USA

Thank you to Paula for leaving this message in the EdinPhoto guestbook:

World War II  -  Family Bakery

"During World War II, my Dad visited Edinburgh while on leave from the airbase in Ipswich.  He and a friend found a family-run bakery on Princes Street.  The owner took them in to her home and treated them like family.

Does anyone have any knowledge of this establishment?

Paula, Ohio, USA: Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook:  April 22, 2010

Reply to Paula

If you'd like to send a reply to Paula please post a reply in the guest book, below her message of April 22, 2010, or else, email me, then I'll pass on your message to her (if she has sent me her email address by then).   Thank you.

Peter Stubbs:  April 23, 2010

  Recollections

34.

Norman O'Donnell

Norman O'Donnell wrote:

Jamieson's

"I remember a large, two-windowed fruit shop on Princes Street in the 1960sI think  its name was Jamiesons. I cannot find anyone else who remembers this shop!

I remember being in Princes Street with my  mum and looking in the windows of the shop,  Exotic fruit had been flown in from all over the world and was being displayed in the window, lovingly cradled in wrappers and on tissue paper! 

Things we take for granted now in the supermarket were a sight to see in this shop  -  pineapples, mangoes etc.

Does anyone out there remember this shop?"

Norman O'Donnell:  November 12, 2010

Reply to Norman

Hi Norman.  In fact a couple of other people on this page have also mentioned Jamieson's.  However, I liked your descriptions of Jamieson's shop windows and thought your memories might remind others a small part of Princes Street. long since gone.

Peter Stubbs,  Edinburgh: November 16, 2010

 

  Recollections

35.

David Mitchell

Portobello, Edinburgh

Thank you to David Mitchell who wrote:

Law & Forest

"Susan Cameron (22 above) wrote about the Edinburgh grocers shop, Law and Forest in Queensferry Street.

Late-1960s

"As a schoolboy I worked in the shop in the late-1960s.  I used to work in the cellar, baling cardboard, sorting returned bottles, packing dried fruit and boiling hams."

Meat Paste

"On Saturdays I made meat paste (paté, as it came to be known).

During the week all the ends of the cooked meats that were too small to fit in the meat slicer were thrown into a cardboard box under the counter.

I took this across the road to the butcher and he put it through his mincer (having first put a slice of bread through it to clean out any residual raw meat).

Back in the shop, I added a pound of melted butter and a bottle of Lea & Perrins sauce, before packing it into large dishes for sale at 2/- a quarter.  The genteel ladies of Alva Street couldn’t get enough of it for their sandwiches."

The Manager

"The manager of the shop, at the time, was a Mr Smith.  His chief assistant was Watson Bonella.  They also owned another (smaller) grocers shop directly opposite called Christies.  Occasionally I was called on to serve in that shop while the manager had his lunch.

Bacon Slicer

"It was there that I had my first encounter with a bacon slicer.  A lady asked for some sliced ham and I asked how she would like it cut, when she said medium I looked at the gauge on the slicer and noting that it was numbered from 1 – 40, I set it to 20.

I can still remember her face when I put the four doorstep slices on to the scales.  They went into the cardboard box to make her meat paste for the following week."

Today

"I was passing the shop today.  It is now an antique jewellers with a controlled entry system.  The owner spotted me peering through the door and thinking that I was a customer, let me in.

The interior was largely unchanged as it is apparently a listed building, both on the outside and the inside."

David Mitchell, Portobello, Edinburgh:  November 16, 2010

 

Recollections

36.

Bruce Johnstone

Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to Bruce Johnstone who remembers Christmas in the Edinburgh stores in the 1950s.

Bruce wrote

Christmas

Binns

"At Christmas time, Binns had a model rail layout facing you as you came down the stairs to the basement,  It was very impressive.

Beyond that was Santa’s grotto which to me, as a 4-7 year old was very realistic."

Patrick Thompson's

"Patrick Thompson's did the same, but never bettered Binns."

Jenners

"Jenners was the department store that retained its rail lay-out until recent years.  It all made Christmas so magic to children."

Bruce Johnstone, Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland:  November 29, 2010

Recollections

37.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan who wrote:

Clark's Shoe Shop

Pedoscope

"When my Mother took me up town to purchase a new pair of shoes, she always went to Clark’s in Princes Street where they had a Pedoscope.

This device was a large box-like construction which the child would mount. It had an aperture at the base into which the newly shod feet would be inserted and, as I recall, three viewing windows at the top through which the child’s parent or guardian and the shop assistant could, together with the child itself, to observe the bones of the feet in relation to the outline of the shoe.

I always requested that the viewing period be extended in order for me to observe the bones in my feet move as I wiggled them.

I believe that these instruments survived into the early-1960s before their health implications became manifest."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  February 7, 2011

 

Recollections

38.

Tony Ivanov

Bo'ness, West Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to Tony Ivanov tor replying to two earlier recollections.

Tony wrote:

Jenners

"In 'Recollections 36', Jenners was mentioned.

As a young boy in the 1950s, I studied piano and on Saturday mornings.  On my way to the music studio for my lessons, I used to pay a visit to Jenners' toy department.

I remember that the main door to Jenners was always opened by a uniformed doorman, complete with top hat.  Even from the age of 8 yrs with my leather brief case, which held my music, I was no exception to this rule.  It didn’t seem to matter that I was just a child.  It made me feel special.  You don’t get that kind of service any more, unless you’re rich and famous."

Clark's Shoe Shop

"In recollection 37, Clark’s Pedoscope is mentioned.  Clark's also had a branch in the Bridges. I think it was part of a larger store.  They had one of these Pedoscopes there.

My mum always bought us Clark’s shoes, which I still regularly buy today, and my brother and I were always on this machine to have our shoes properly sized.

Usually we went on it several times during the purchase as we tried on different shoes, as did other children. These were x-rays and goodness knows how much radiation children were subjected to while shops were using these machines. It’s a wonder we didn’t glow in the dark."

Tony Ivanov:  Bo'ness, West Lothian, Scotland:  February 7, 2011

Recollections

39.

GM Rigg

New Zealand

Thank you to Allan who wrote:

Clark's Shoe Shop

"I have just read recollections and have been reminded of the pedoscope used to size shoes. It fascinated me too, as a wee lass, seeing my toes wiggling in the new shoes.

I had my shoes from the same shoe shop at the Bridges that sold the Clarke's shoes.  They also sold the summer sandals, which were bought for me every year - always tan, and possibly called Norvic or something similar."

Jenners

"I loved to go into Jenners - not that we could buy much more than haberdashery there, but such a treat to go in.

I loved the Brittains animal models.  The shop was best at Christmas. Their windows were always fantastic, their toy department was amazing, and the huge tree that was erected in their main open hall with the 3 or 4 levels of handrails on the balconies was such a sight to see."

John Menzies

"I liked the toy department in John Menzies store opposite the Waverly steps where I could drool over the toys I couldn't afford.

I clearly remember the big display of Swoppits!  There were cowboys, Indians, Knights, etc., all with bits that came off and could be swapped around."

GM Rigg, New Zealand:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, July 6, 2011

Recollections

40.

June Sutherland

Oxfordshire, England

Thank you to June Sutherland who wrote:

Etam

"Does anybody remember Etam's on Princess Street?  There were two shops.  One was futher along towards the West End, but  I worked in the smaller shop, next to C&As.

 I was aged 15/16 in 1970/71.  My Manager was a Miss Mack, and I also worked with two sisters (Italian family, I think).  I recently visited Edinburgh and took a walk past, but can't work out what store it is now.  I wonder if anyone can help me place it."

Patrick Thomson

"I later worked in Patrick Thompson's Gown Department.  We all wore black and had to attend customers in the fitting rooms, trying the dresses on.  There was a pipe system that ran around the whole shop, and you took the cash, placed it in a small tube and it would we transported upstairs to the  accounts department."

Darlings

"I also remember Darlings and 'Darlings Dungeons' which was a boutique in the basement, all done out with low lights, skeletons and cobwebs.  I think the lighting may have been a bit too low as I seem to remember you had trouble seeing what you looked like.  But at 16 it all felt very trendy and hip!"

June Sutherland, Oxfordshire, England:  June 12, 2011

 

Recollections

41

Margaret Cooper

London, England

Thank you to Margaret Cooper who wrote:

Dolls' Hospital
at
Lauriston Place

"There was a converted shop up Lauriston Place just before the Royal Infirmary on the left.

It was a little 'Doll's Hospital'.  The shopkeeper would repair all our dolls for sixpence."

Margaret Coope, London, England
Message + email address posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, January 21, 2012

 

Recollections

42.

Rosemary Shariff (née Craig)

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Thank you to Rosemary Shariff who wrote:

Dolls' Hospital
at
Lauriston Place

"Ever since you mentioned the Doll's Hospital opposite St. Mary's Cathedral, I began to recall a Doll's Hospital near the Royal Infirmary, but thought that perhaps it was my imagination.

Now, I know better, thanks to Margaret Cooper.  My memory is one of fascination as I gazed in the window and stared at the dolls in various stages of repair."

Rosemary Shariff (née Craig), Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Reply posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, January 22, 2012

 

Recollections

43.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds who wrote:

Question

Valvona & Crolla

"I've just completed my new book on Edinburgh in the 1940s and 1950s.  One recollection I have is of going into Valvona & Crolla's deli in Elm Row where, in the front shop, they employed a black African boy dressed in exotic robes and sporting a turban

His job was to grind the Parmesan cheese and presumably attract customers.  I was most impressed by the sight of him as I had never seen a black person before except in book illustrations.

In order to verify my recollection objectively I therefore wrote to Philip Contini, Valvona & Crolla's current MD, to ask if he had any photos of this young chap in the shop's archives.

He replied that the company had never employed such a person and that it was probably a Sikh wearing a turban that I was referring to, as the company traditionally employed a variety of ethnicity.

I pointed out that this was certainly not the case, and that I could still see the boy vividly in my mind's eye.  He was jet black with shiny skin and his clothes were almost theatrical in appearance.

There must be some readers who can tell me if my memory is failing me or if I am indeed correct."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  March 13, 2012

 

Recollections

44.

Allan Watson

Edinburgh

Thank you to Alan Watson who wrote:

Shops on The Bridges

"An old Edinburgh Chestnut"

"Three small Edinburgh boys were stopped in the street by a policeman for some minor misdemeanor.

On being asked for their names, the first replied "Patrick Thomson"; the second "Peter Allan"; the third, and by far the youngest, proud to be quick on the up-take, triumphantly identified himself as "The Edinburgh and Dumfriesshire Dairy".

Alan Watson, Edinburgh:  July 6, 2012

 

Recollections

45.

Winnie Lisowski

Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland

Winnie Lisowski remembers a pet shop on the corner of London Road and Leith Walk.

Winnie wrote:

Dofos Pet Centre

5 Blenheim Place

"In 1953, when I was 7 years old, my parents bought me my first dog at Dofos pet shop. It cost £1 and I had him for 14 years.

I'm amazed that this shop still exists as a pet shop, sixty years later.

I saw a 'For Sale' sign up at the shop, back in the summer, and thought how sad that it might never be a pet shop again. However, I was glad to hear that it is just going to change ownership, but will remain a pet shop."

Winnie Lisowski, Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland:  November 7, 2012

 

Recollections

46.

June Wood (née Robertson)

Arroyo Grande, Central Coast, California, USA

Thank you to June Robertson Wood for posting a message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

June wrote:

Chemists' Shops

"I was on the phone to a friend today when a memory popped up.  We both remembered chemists' shops in Edinburgh having really big jars, filled with colored water, all shades from blue, green, amber and red.

We can't remember which of the Edinburgh chemists had these big jars.  Perhaps others will remember them.  I wonder what the history on them is."

June Wood (née Robertson)Arroyo Grande, Central Coast, California, USA:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: 1 June, 2013  +  email: 3 Jun 2013

 

Recollections

47.

Betty Hepburn (née Boland)

Waikanae, Kapiti Coast, New Zealand

Thank you to Betty Hepburn, now living in New Zealand for posting a reply to  for posting a reply in the EdinPhoto guestbook to June Wood's message in Recollections 46 above.

Betty wrote:

Chemists' Shops

"There was a chemist shop in Fountainbridge, almost next to the stair where Sean Connery lived.  Those big coloured jars used to fascinate me.  They sat on top of the big wooden cabinet drawers.

I think, as a bairn, I imagined it was medicine but ,as you say, it was most likely coloured water!"

Betty Hepburn (née Boland), Waikanae, Kapiti Coast, New Zealand
 Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: 1 June, 2013

 

Recollections

48.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds for also replying to June Wood's message  in Recollections 46 above.

Allan wrote:

Chemists' Shops

"June Wood asks about chemists' shops with jars filled with coloured liquid. These were displayed in almost all chemists' shops' front windows in the 1950s.  The 'carboys', as they were called, evolved over a couple of centuries from small receptacles to much larger ones as shop window panes became larger through advances in glass making technology.

Canonmills Chemist

At Canonmills in the 1950s, Miss Bryson's chemist's shop sported three of those receptacles in the front window.  Even more impressive, inside were huge mahogany cabinets of powders and potions, all with Latin names.

Miss Bryson was trusted every bit as much as the Doctor in those days.  Once, she refused to issue a prescription to my Mother because she thought that the Doctor had got the dosage wrong.  She telephoned him, demanding clarification, and the Doctor backed down and apologised for his mistake.

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  4 June 2013

 

Recollections

49.

Connie Newman

East Peckham, Kent, England

Thank you to Connie Newman for posting a reply  to Recollections 46 above in the Edinphoto guestbook.

Connie  wrote to June:

Chemist Shops

Internet Article

"If you Google  (or search with whatever search engine you use) for 'old chemist shops bottles of coloured water' you will see a very interesting article."

My Dad's Shop

"My Dad had the ice-cream shop in Anchorfield, Newhaven.

Next door, there was a lovely chemist shop run by a Mr Gourlay, with the help of his wife.  He had those big bottles of coloured water in his windows and in the shop.

The old chemist shop is now a Bookies, and my Dad's shop is a rather tatty Chinese takeaway!"

Connie Newman, East Peckham, Kent, England:  Reply posted in EdinPhoto guestbook on 11 June
 2013, in response to an original message posted in the guestbook by June Wood on 1 June 2013.

 

Recollections

50.

Mal Acton

Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Thank you to Mal Acton who wrote:

Drumsheugh Gardens

"When my late Aunt lived in Belford Road, she would send me to a bakers on the corner of Drumsheugh Gardens and Queensferry Street for Morning Rolls.

Is this term unique to Edinburgh, or have I been away too long?"

Dean Village

"My Aunt also sometimes sent me to the little Red Shop in Dean Village. It was down the stair from Belford Road and just over the bridge with a red door.

I could see it from her landing, which also had a great view of Dean Bridge. Again. that has gone.

It appears to have been converted to flats or a house.  Does anyone know when please?"

Mel Acton, Liverpool, Lancashire, England:  January 4, 2013

 

Recollections

51.

John Hughes

Thank you to John Hughes for sending a reply to the question asked by in GM Rigg in his Recollections 7 above

GM Rigg wrote:

Bread Street

"The Bread Street Co-op was where we collected our divi or dividend money.

The big dry goods shop in Bread Street was also one of my mother's main shops.  I  can't recall the name of it."

G M Rigg, New Zealand,
 message posted in EdinPhoto guest book:  January 22, 2009

John Hughes replied

Bread Street

"The big shop in Bread Street, Edinburgh was St Cuthbert's Co-op's main department store.   It was a good shop and sold everything."

John Hughes:  October 1, 2013

 

Recollections

52.

Donald Grant

Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland

Thank you to Donald Grant who wrote:

Filming

St Cuthbert's Co-op

Bread Street

Actors

"Around 1985 my cousin, the Dundee born actor Brian Cox and Jimmy Nail were in a drama called 'Shoot For The Sun' that was made for BBC.

The film was set in Edinburgh, but most of the outdoor location work was filmed in Edinburgh.

However, one scene, on the stairway of a department store, was filmed in St. Cuthbert'sstore in Bread Street."

Extras

"Brian had stayed with us in the 1960's, while he was with the Royal Lyceum Theatre's company of actors.   By way of a small 'thanks' he got my mother and one of her friends parts as extras in the stairway scene.

All they had to do was walk up the stairs, quietly chatting to each other whilst Brian and Jimmy did their scene going down the stairs. If  memory serves correctly they each received the princely sum of £25 for their very brief appearance on screen."

Donald Grant, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland:  October 3, 2013

 

Recollections

53.

Alexander Hay

Thank you to Alexander Hay for posting a reply in the EdinPhoto Guestbook.

Alexander wrote:

John Knox House

Tartan Shop

"I remember from childhood that the tartan shop on the ground floor of John Knox's house bore the name of 'W J Hay', carved in stone and gilded, above the doorway.  So it must have at one time been his studio.

Antiques Shop

"The antiques shop next door was owned by Esta Hendry, a larger-than-life Edinburgh character who was often in the news.

She was a councilor and an outspoken champion of the poor, and hence very popular.

Celebrity visitors to Auld Reekie often visited her shop, and in 1949 Charles Laughton accompanied by Agnes Moorehead attracted a crowd of sightseers, and I managed to get their autographs."

Alexander Hay:  Reply posted on 4 October 2013in EdinPhoto Guestbook in response to a message posted by Linda Elliott in the Guestbook on 22 July 2006.

 

Recollections

54.

Margaret Shearer

Braids, Edinburgh

Thank you to Margaret Shearer who wrote:

Bristo Street

Grocer's Shop

Matthew H Shearer

"My father had a grocer's shop, Shearer's, at 30 Bristo Street.  It was given to him by Todd & Co, Leith,  long as he bought wholesale from them.  He did!

I remember:

-  Shearer's specialised in bacon and eggs but my Grandfather did his own tea blending

The Message boys were all from one family.  They delivered goods all over the city.

My father kept a black cat which used to jump up on favourite customers' shoulders.  There was no 'Health & Safety' for that sawdust floored shop!

Each Saturday he would bring home a bag of broken biscuits. I never knew the real shape or size of Bourbon biscuits till he retired!

-  Next door to his shop was the Ironmongers, then Young the bakers.  Opposite was the Pub and Parkers.

Maggie Shearer, Braids, Edinburgh:  January 11, 2014

 

Recollections

55.

Terry Cox

Fairmilehead, Edinburgh

Thank you to Terry Cox for replying to the comments from Margaret Shearer in Recollections 54 above. 

Terry wrote:

Bristo Street

Grocer's Shop

Matthew H Shearer

"I was interested to read Recollections 54 above, from Margaret Shearer.

I remember both Margaret and her father and their shop in Bristo Street. I think it was dark green."

Lauriston Place

Sunday School

and Bible Class

"What I remember best is our Sunday School and Bible Class that I attended and they were involved in.  It was at at the Coleman Jennings Hall in Lauriston Place, opposite the top of Glen Street.

Coincidentally, you have a picture of the hall, under 'Tollcross, Lauriston Place' with the word 'Billiards' on the end of the building and a poster for the church in the window.

Lauriston Place, Tollcross  -  buildings now demolished, 2006 ©

The hall was on the floor below the word 'Billiards' and I assume it had been used for billiards and snooker at one time, as the rest of the building was composed of flats, with shops on the ground floor.

The Sunday School, Bible Class, etc, eventually moved up to the Bruntsfield Evangelical Church in Leamington Terrace, where I think it still is. The last time I was there was in 1969. This was the last time I saw Margaret.

I hope she's keeping well, and would like to get in touch with her if she still remembers me!"

Terry Cox, Fairmilehead, Edinburgh:  January 13+20, 2014

Message for Terry Cox

I've now passed on Margaret Shearer's email address to Terry Cox. 

I hope that Terry will be able to make contact again with her.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  January 22, 2014

 

Recollections

56.

Jim Suddon

Morningside, Edinburgh

Thank you to Jim Suddon who wrote:

Jamieson's Fruit Shop

"Jamiesons Shop in Princes Street closed in the early 1970s.  It was expensive as the fruit was flown-in and the air freight was not carried on the scale it is today. My wife loved the shop.  She used to buy my oldest son some lovely things there and the quality was always top notch."

R W Forsyth

Location

"R.W. Forsyth was the large shop at the corner of Prices Street and South St Davids Street.  It was a shop that sold a wide range of items and was particularly good for sports wear and sporting goods."

Upper Classes

"The basement opened as a food hall and, for a time, was very successful but over the years it never tried to attract ordinary people, preferring to cater for the upper classes*.

Forsyth's used to maintain a beautiful fleet of black and yellow vans which were parked in Meuse Lane behind the shop. You could see dresses, coats etc be loaded into a van, then the driver and a store assistant would take them to some lady in the New Town for her to try on in her home.

The cost of this type of service was expensive and the number of clients gradually reduced."

Window Displays

"One of the highlights of the shop was its window display when Rugby Internationals were being played. The history, the jerseys and photos of the teams were on a full window display. They also used to issue a little book each year with all the rugby fixtures. This was given out free to customers."

Then and Now

"R W Forsyth's in Edinburgh actually had a door from St Andrew Square leading to their sports and toy department location, then there was a bridge into the main shop.

The shop was always beautifully maintained with the brass polished.  It's sad to see it now, when even the dome has been removed  -  and where have all the trumpets gone?.

RW Forsyth's had another large store in Renfield Street in Glasgow which closed at the same time as the Princes Street shop."

Jim Suddon, Morningside, Edinburgh:  August 31, 2012  (2 emails)

Here, Jim Suddon originally wrote 'hoi polloi'  However, George Smith of British Columbia, Canada pointed out this error to me.  So I've now substituted 'upper classes' for 'hoi polloi'.

 

Recollections

57.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds who wrote again on the subject that he raised in his Recollections 43 above.  I received no replies to his Recollections 43.  Perhaps somebody will reply to his comments here.

Allan wrote:

Question

Valvona & Crolla

"When I was a child, my Mother would very occasionally take me to Valvona and Crolla's shop in Leith Walk to purchase gorgonzola cheese which was one of my Father's favourites.

I was fascinated by the presence of a black boy wearing exotic clothes and a turban who would grind the parmesan cheese.

This memory is very vivid in my mind, yet when I questioned the shop recently they denied the truth of it and suggested that the black, turbaned boy must have been a customer!

This is inconceivable as there were no black people in Edinburgh in the 1950s and if there had been, they would not have shopped at an Italian deli!"

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  March 13, 2012

 

Recollections

58.

Lyndsay (formerly Linda) Montgomery

Old Town, Edinburgh

Thank you to Lyndsay Montgomery who wrote:

Shopping with my Mum

"I've just been looking at the bit on your site about Parker's Stores:

Parker's store

    A fire in the flat above Parker's Store, Bristo Street, 1956 ©

I remember going there with my mother on a Saturday.  We lived at Niddrie Mill, so a bus trip into town with Mum was an interesting happening.

My mum would be dressed in her better things and me too.  We would go to all the shops on South Bridge:

 Peter Allans

J and R Allans

Patrick Thompson's

 and, on occasions,

 Parker's."

Parker's store

Parkers was like an Aladdin's cave to me.  You could go from the front door all the way through the building to the end of the street, in all the departments.

My mum was a sewer and made all my clothes when I was small.  She made our curtains and liked to change the decor in the house often, so, this was one of her favourite places to go.

 My Father claimed that one day, my mother would be found there, in a roll of carpet or curtain material!"

Linda (now Lyndsay) Montgomery, Old Town, Edinburgh:  November 6, 2014

 

Recollections  -  More Pages

Recollections  -   Contributors

 

 

Links to Other Pages

EdinPhoto - Home Page      Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.      At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.            At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photogrpahers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.  Details of who owns the copyright of photographs and other mateiral on this web site.

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Frequently Asked Questions

Let the cursor hover over any of the buttons above and it will display further details.

LINKS:  All underlined words and pictures on this site are links.  Please click on any of them..